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  1. collectorofmanythings

    Pilot E95S (Elite 95S) Review

    Hello! First of all, this is only my third review on FPN, so if you can please leave constructive criticism below! I would love to improve the quality of my reviews. The Pilot E95S seems to be like the least expensive gold nib pen that is consistently offered here in the U.S. . The only cheaper one I can think of is the Platinum PTL-5000A, which I would love if it was consistently offered in the U.S., but they seem to constantly discontinue it. So, this is a very popular first gold nib pen. It was my second gold nib, so I did get it relatively early in my fountain pen hobby. For a quick summary of the review, I like this pen. I don’t love it, but it’s is great value, and I definitely recommend it. Design and Build Quality (8.5/10) For the most part, this design is great. It is slim, but comfortable, has a great inlaid nib (which I love), is compact, but bigger when posted, and the feeling of capping and uncapping is great. But, Pilot’s black resin does not hold up to the little metal things on the inside of the cap that hold it on. It has fine scratches on it, which are pretty apparent. Now, I am one of those people who sort of like that, and don’t really want pens to look brand new, I want them to look like I used them. But I can understand how this can annoy some people. That’s why it’s a 8.5/10, instead of a 10/10. Nib Performance and Writing Experience (9/10) This nib is great. I have a fine nib, which is 14k gold and inlaid. It is smooth, and quite soft. I would call this a flex, semi-flex, or soft nib, but a quite soft nib. By that I mean that you can get some line variation, but not that much where you can use it for calligraphy, just a bouncy writing experience. The only thing is it is just a bit particular with inks. Both Noodler’s Walnut and Diamine Chocolate Brown were just a bit too dry for it, and it had some skipping. But all Herbin, Jacques Herbin, and Iroshizuku work great with it from my experience. With them the pen is not especially wet, but I wouldn’t call it dry either. With the writing sample, I used Jacques Herbin Terre d’Ombre, which is currently my favorite ink but might be replaced by Robert Oster Caffe Crema when that ink sample gets to me, and on 52gsm cream Tomoe River Paper. Conclusion This a great pen, and a great value! I highly recommend it. It’s really great! Little Note- It seems like every place I go to except for JetPens sells it as the Pilot E95S for $136, but JetPens sells it as the Pilot Elite 95S for $136 as well. Just a little thing. Edit- It was to commemorate the 95th anniversary of Pilot, but is not a limited edition. It also comes with the Pilot CON-40, but can fit the discontinued CON-20. Now the pictures: The second to last photo shows scratches on the barrel, and the last one shows the metal things on the inside of the cap.
  2. LightYagami

    Lamy Scala Popular?

    Hi all, I'm curious about where Lamy Scala stands in the grand scheme of Lamy pens in terms of popularity. I know it's not as popular as the 2000 or Safari, but really, how popular or unpopular is it? And what about the one in pianoblack with gold nib? Feel free to express your views.
  3. Introduction This is a review of the "Master" from Kaco. I saw precious few reviews of this pen while I was researching for it, for possible purchase, either on youtube or written. I took a chance based on a few comments regarding the quality of the nib, and I am very glad that I did. This is one of those occassions where a gamble pays off. This is one of the best, if not the best, Chinese pens that I own - compared to 5 pens form PenBBS, 5 from Moonman and a couple of Wing Sungs and Jinhaos. This is also the most expensive Chinese made pen that I own, beating the 14K WingSung 698 and the Bock nibbed Moonman 800 (another excellent pen); however at $80, its not expensive for what you get. This pen cost around $80 on one of the discount weeks on Aliexpress. However, the price tends to fluctuate quite a bit from mid 80s to even up to $140...so try to catch a good deal if you can. For anything less than $100 - this pen is an absolute steal. Both for the elegance and ergonomics of the design as well as for the surprisingly springy and precise gold fine nib (which though an interesting quirk to keep in mind as I discuss below). Appearance & Design - This pen as a cigar shaped design (with the cap slightly more rounded than the barrel) which is a classic. The material is a glossy black resin polished to a high shine. there is only one visible accent which is a substantial metal clip. The clip is one of the defining features of this as it is spring loaded; and attached to the top of the cap. The clip also fit into a clip-shaped recess in the cap, so that the clip is almost (but not exacly) flush with the surface of the cap. the clip also has the only visible logo on the pen (besides the nib which I shall come to). Due to the spring mechanism, the clip is extremely ease to operate and very functional; if you care to post a pen this big. Other than that; the pen is understated and elegant. It seems perfect for use at workplace (will I use my most colorway acrylic pens in the workplace with impunity, but some workplaces are more stuffy I am told ;-)) . This seems to be a theme with Kaco - they seem to prefer to make 'business gift' oriented pens in solid colors and have seemingly eschewed colorful resins till now. the pen comes with an oval dedicated pen case, which can be stood upright, whereby it also operates as a pen holder. It has a foam insert with a hole cut out to rest the barrel so that the resin pen does not court scratches from the metal sides of the holder. Apologies as this was left in my office, and I could not fetch that (and a lot more things) given that lockdown was imposed in our country on a weekend night with 4 hours notice! So this link should give a fair idea Opening the cap, one sees an ample hourglass shaped section, followed by a number 6 14k nib in Fine with a minimalist design - just two lines parallel to the shoulders and the logo and below that, the words 14k. there is a broad thermoplastic feed which is similar to (but not same as) as Jowo #6 feed. the section is long and the threads for the cap are precise. The nib seems perfectly proportioned to the size of the pen. Overall, the pen looks stellar and understated. It reminds one of high end Urushi pens from across the East China Sea. It made me renege on my decision to not buy another black black for a while; so that's something. I just wish they offered this model in other solid colors (on this note, there is a steel nibbed, slightly smaller, version of this pen which cost about $30 and is also available in appealing red and white versions. Wonder why they didn't provide options for the 14k model...I'd have loved me a red version...). I also like that it does not look like an obvious rip off any other design - various influences are there (for example the clip is similar (though not identical) to that in the Lamy Imporium, and the body is similar to several Japanese ebonite and urushi pens, it is distinct enough to be an unique design. Construction & Quality– Construction is top notch. Forgot $100; it would not disappoint in a pen worth $300. There is no squeak in turning the threads (either of the barrel or the cap). The polish in the resin body and gold plated clip is top notch with a mirror like finish when new. On the flip side, this causes any gathered lint or dust to stand out, and may highlight even the smallest scratches (which it does; if you are one inspects obsessively). One that note, while the gold plating is of good quality, it does feel a bit soft and scratch prone; I have been accordingly, careful of how I place of the cap on the table etc. The nib and feed attach into a housing which doesn't appear to be removable. At least I was not able to. The nib and feed though can be pulled out with some effort. Weight, Dimensions and ergonomics This is a big pen, bordering on oversize. Smilar to MB149 and Sailor KOP Profit; However, most of the girth is in the cap; the barrel is actually, reasonably slim. Length; weight (capped): 154mm (6.06"); 28gms gms (1 oz) Length; weight (uncapped) : 135mm (5.3”) (measured from tip of nib); 14gms (0.5 oz) Length; (posted) : 161mm (6.34") Section length : 25mm (1”) Section diameter: 11mm to 13mm (0.43 – 0.5 inch) [this is a rough calculation). In short, it is large but not egregiously so. Further, the cap weighs exactly half the total pen weight (due to the substantial clip and the significantly larger diameter); hence it is very light and comfortable when used uncapped. I stress: this pen is perfect as far as ergonomics go. the section is perfectly contoured and the length and weight (uncapped) is just right. Some comparison pictures are below: This is what it looks like next to the PenBBS 380 and the Pilot Justus - both similarly large black pens pens at around 145-150 mm (5.8-6"") posted. This is a comparison with some other pens (left to right: TWSBI 580AL, Sailor Pro gear slim, Kaco Master, Montegrappa Fortuna teak, PenBBS 456) It posts deeply but not securely. You wouldn't need to post this pen; but you can subject to cap possibly falling if you suddenly turn it around. Nib & Performance - Cue: customary bokeh shot of nib It has a very well-tuned #6 nib which extremely springy and relatively soft, for a modern nib. the odd thing is that it has a significant forward curve; this creates an ...interesting sensation, as the apparent angle of the pen to paper is different from your normal holding angle. the forward curve can cause the pen to catch to paper in sudden down-to-up movements; such as rounding a 'g' or bottom-extension of an 'f'; this is more so on rougher papers. This seems to be a conscious design choice, as the pictures in the web listing suggest that this helps appreciate/ fully utilize the springiness of the nib. Even with this, I really do enjoy the nib - it is springy and soft, and really smooth with the required traction to have sufficient control over the written word. While springy, this is not a flex nib, and I wouldn't feel comfortable trying to coax out line variation. Pic of pronounced forward curve of the nib: The feed is a jowo type wide shoulder one; but is perfectly tailored to the curve of the nib. It was a little dry at first, but after a little adjustment, is providing uninterrupted generous supply of ink. Filling System & Maintenance – This is a simple C/C system. The converter is interchangeable with a schmidt K5 converter. The supplied one looks slightly larger but I could be mistaken. Disappointingly, it does not have metal reinforcements at the mouth. the plastic also is slightly cloudy and not crystal clear. However, it is perfectly functional. It is good that it uses the K5 standard, as one can use cartridges in a pinch. (apologies for the bubbles - it was a hurried fill) The nib is a true fine. When I think of fine, I think of this line width. Since this pen supplies, it makes me satisfied. Here is a comparison to well known nibs with similar line widths, namely European fines and Japanese Medium, with the same ink in all (Pilot Iro Yama Guri): As you can see, this nib writes very similar to a Jowo or Bock fine; and also similar to a pilot 14K and Sailor 14K Medium. The Kanwrite F is slightly finer, and the penBBS F is way fatter (its actually closer to a western medium). the Moonman is between the Kaco and the PenBBS. Some longer writing samples; one on Rhodia and the other on ITC classmate (a low cost, but really good, student notebook) Cost & Value – I paid about $80. This is on the lower end for this pen and usually available during sales. At this price, it is a phenomenal deal. I would say, given the quality, ergonomics and writing experience, anything below $125 is a good deal. Conclusion – This is a pen which ticks most boxes. I find it among the most comfortable pens to hold, and the writing experience, even with the quirky angle on the nib, is pleasurable. The build quality and finish is superb. Only concern for me is finding replacement feeds/ nibs in case of damage and the lack of color and nib width alternatives, which would prevent it from being a pen appreciated by a broader spectrum of FP users.
  4. Jobesmirage

    Conklin Pen Identification

    Hi Everyone, I picked up one of these a while ago and I don't know enough about Conklins to correctly identify this pen and was wondering if anyone knew the model/name?
  5. With the current COVID-19 crisis, I have been spending a lot of time at home. I have rediscovered all my old calligraphy pens and have been relearning the art of fine writing. I was still missing a few items, and I came across an old box in my basement. I found several old items of ink, nibs, etc. In one of the boxes I found my old Parker 75 14k fine italic fountain pen. I remember purchasing it about 1985. So it is 35 years old. It was hardly used as it had the original cartridge still in the barrel. I hoped that the pen was not ruined because it had been left with the ink inside. I spent about an hour cleaning it up. Removed the nib and feeder, then pit it back together. I re-inked the pen and it works like a charm. I dont know how much these things are worth today, but I did a quick check on my particular nib, and a new old nib would cost $125. I remember spending $50 for the pen in 1985, a lot of money for me back then. Anyway I was just excited to find this old treasure in my basement. I am including a few images of the pen. The pen itself is extremely slim and quite small. It has to be posted in order to use it. Any interesting comments about the Parker 75 would be appreciated.
  6. CarrotBasket

    Gold Duofold Pocket Pen?

    Hello fine folk of the forum! I found this at the flea market, it apears to be a vest pocket duofold, it is only slightly longer than my kaweco sport but I haven´t been able to find pictures of this pattern anywhere. I have seen some jack-knife models with these gold waves but this one has breather holes, an inner cap and the christmas tree feed. It came with a "Warranted 14k USA" nib which seems to be too small for the pen thouh it fits the feed nicely. The green section and brown tail cap would sugest they aren´t from the original pen buit they fit perfectly. Have you seen these before? Any aditional info is apreciated
  7. Please see the other post on the same topic. This got posted midway to writing by mistake.
  8. I would love to find more info on this pen I bought years ago. It’s a good-sized blue 1920’s-ish FP with a 14k gold nib, the FORD logo on the clip, and “Harry Richman Club” stamped in orange or red on the barrel. Only recently I saw a pen like this on eBay but without the Richman stamp. Harry Richman was a singer/actor who sang the famous song “Putting on the Ritz” and owned his own namesake club in NYC for a time in the 20’s/30’s. I would love to know the connection between FORD and Richman and any estimated worth or value. Thanks! Scott
  9. itskato

    Nakaya Nib Comparison

    So I was planning to buy a nakaya medium nib, then I saw this review https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQSfX91oAC4 by Mr. Brown. As you can see in the video the regular medium seems very dry and hard as a nail. Then I saw the soft medium, it seems like it is the nib I really want. A little bit flexible and pretty wet. But still I can't be so sure just from watching a video. So I'd like to ask anyone that has experienced it firsthand how the soft medium feel compared to the regular medium nakaya nib (is the medium really that dry? because I'm a little bit shocked at how dry and hard it is). My favorite kind of spring is the m200 fine steel nib. It is springy but not to springy. I don't like a nib that is too springy like the soft fine 14K platinum nib. Please share your experience on the nakaya soft medium and medium nib! It'd be much better if there is a comparison of those nakaya nibs to pelikan m200 fine nib and platinum soft fine nib. Thanks in advance! Edited: seems like I provided a wrong link to an anime video, I've corrected the youtube link
  10. I was thinking of getting a Sailor Pro Gear Slim in Broad nib. Whats keeping me from adding it to the cart is the sweet spot issue about Sailor nibs. In numerous posts I have heard Sailor Medium and broader nibs have a definite "step" to the nib tipping which gives the typical Sailor smoothness-feedback balance. Provided I won't be rotating the pen, the thing is the writing angle. I hold my pen with a standard tripod grip at an angle of 45 degrees. I heard Sailor nibs have to be held at lower angles. Is 45 degrees low enough or is it going to scratch instead of giving its signature feedback? P.S- I don't want to buy and send it a nibmeister to smoothen the "step" out. I would I go with the default "step" to the Sailor pen or won't go for it.
  11. Hello everyone, I bought a Platinum Pocket Pen a few months ago whose model name I don't know but would love to find out. I look forward for help and thank you. I read some topics here on FPN on Platinum and Pilot pocket pens, found old advertisements but can't identify it assuredly. Some characteristics are: - made by Platinum - black body with gold trim - 14k nib - accepts modern Platinum cartdridges but not converters - lenght closed ~11,9cm, lenght open ~10,3cm, lenght posted ~14,9cm - the trim on the clip and cap looks more yellowish than the ring on the body Again, thanks for any help!
  12. Hello again to all my FPN friends, I know anytime you use the word "best" for something as subjective as a fountain pen you'll get varied responses, but that's what I'm hoping for. Here's my question for you all: In your opinion, what is the best gold-nibbed Chinese pen (a Chinese branded pen, not just a pen made in China) available on the market today? Along with your recommendation, please explain why the nib feels great to you and what you like about both the pen and nib. What does the nib feel like on the paper? How much feedback? Including that information will help others decide whether the pen is a good choice for them. Thanks in advance for your contributions!
  13. I was selling a Pacific ocean blue Lamy Alstar with a 14k solid gold nib in the past few months. The nib grade is extra fine. I bought the pen and the nib seperately and put them together since I thought the color is really compelling however, a pal said my gold nib had a tad bid of baby bottom. And thus, I could not have my pen sold though the pen is mint and I set a fair price for it. Do you guys regard Lamy alstar as a student pen? Is this conbination unproper?
  14. Hi! So I believe I have a pretty rare Meisterstuck as I can not find it anywhere online! Essentially it is the same as this pen, except its a rollerball. https://www.penporium.com/MONTBLANC-144-SOLITAIRE-SOLID-GOLD-FOUNTAIN-PEN-p/3009.htm The closest thing I can find to my pen is actually from an image posted on this very forum! https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/uploads/imgs/fpn_1314297331__aumb.jpg My pen is very similar to the "163SG" except it does not have the black portion on the bottom, the design continues all the way down the pen. Does anyone have any information on my pen? I am also wondering how much it would go for in the used marker in good condition. Photos of the pen: https://i.imgur.com/41DHPRC.jpg https://i.imgur.com/DFcd2sp.jpg https://i.imgur.com/Qk0jOLR.jpg If any other angle would help please let me know! Thanks!
  15. I just received this pen via an online auction and I'm trying to pin down the identity. It's a Sheaffer, cartridge/squeeze converter, "Gold Electroplated", "Sheaffer Made in U.S.A.", nib is inlaid 585 14K gold. I think I have it narrowed down to either an Imperial 727 or 777. The differences between the two models isn't clear to me. Any help would be appreciated.
  16. I bought this pen on eBay recently and thought I'd stumbled on a wet noodle pen (seller had this in all caps in the title) for a steal at ~$62. Problem is, this pen is almost certainly not a wet noodle, as defined by going off of what I know of them, based on me trying to flex the tines (which are about as flexible as an Ahab (so not very flexible at all), and much sharper, for those wondering). There's a fair amount of scratching, damage, and bite marks to it, which brings me to my next point. The section and barrel won't come apart, and the lever filler clip stops at a certain point. As someone who is totally inexperienced with restoration, could I restore it on my own or would it be better to send it off to an expert? I could deal with the latter, but as a student, if it costs too much, I don't know if I can. https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/uploads/imgs/fpn_1555954263__img_e4474.jpg
  17. Loved the MB's flagship pen review by Betweenthelines. And then realized, I was yet to post a review on FPN for the lesser one, the 146. As for me, I came across a real Montblanc pretty much later in life, though used to love a pen called Camlin Premier during school days. It came with a 1-pen leather pouch, an additional screw-fit nib and it did have those striped ink windows. I say I loved it, but never wrote with it since it belonged to my dad and I was a small kid. Back in 1999-2000, it cost around USD 5.00 and it was a hefty price tag for any locally made fountain pen. Later I did realize that it was yet another MB 146 inspiration, when I went to a pen store in Calcutta. So here goes my review @ blogger too with some more pics: A Tale of the lesser flagship of Montblanc : The Meisterstück 146 A BRIEFER HISTORY IN TIME MONT BLANC As most of you would know, Montblanc was started in 1906 a Hamburg banker, Alfred Nehemias, and a Berlin engineer, August Eberstein as Simplizissimus-Füllhalter which means Simplistic Fountain pens, after they learnt about fountain pens with ink tanks from the US. By 1908, three other people by the name of Wilhelm Dziambor, Christian Lausen and later Claus Johannes Voss had taken over the business and the company took the name “Simplo Filler Pen Co.” which referred to a fountain pen design with a built-in ink-tank. In 1909, a safety fountain pen made up of hard rubber called “Rouge et Noir” was launched, which actually means Red and Black. The pen consisted of a red cap and a black body, perhaps inspired from a card-game. You can also find a limited edition of the same. In 1910, the company became Mont Blanc, inspired by the highest peak of the Alps (4810 m) and a pen called Montblanc was introduced with a white tip (which would later evolve into a white star in 1913). In 1926, the Meisterstück was launched. By 1929, the nibs were engraved with 4810, the official height of Mont Blanc peak, as an allusion to supreme quality and craftsmanship. The flagship Meisterstück 149 was launched in 1952, evolving from celluloid & brass mechanism to resin & plastic mechanism over the years. For the Meisterstück 146, the ink windows were modified to striped version somewhere around the 1970s from clear blue window and the the two-tone nib was introduced in 1993-94. As far as the model numbers XYZ (146) are concerned, MB did traditionally follow a naming convention, albeit in a rather loose mannerX or 1: Tier of pen, 1 - Top class or Meisterstück 2 - Medium range & 3 - EconomyY or 4: 0 - Safety filler, 2 - Button Filler, 3/4 - Piston FillerZ or 6: Nib size, 9 being the largest MB eventually stopped production of all economy pens in 1992. DESIGN (5/6) The pen is made of glossy 'precious resin' (a custom variant of Polymethyl methacrylateaka PMMA) and is adorned plated rings and bands. Glistening golden with the subtle shine of black preserve a culture while adding a modern luxurious touch. This specific cigar shape was later copied around the world by many leading pen makers, over decades till date. The cigar shape was invented by Sheaffer Balance in 1928. The 146 also comes with platinum plated trims. The resin does feel substantial to hold, but it's also prone to scratches, if due care is not exercised. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Bdf5EwHxYco/VaEdqGTo-GI/AAAAAAAAEw0/d-mgo1330LE/s1600/DSC_1786.jpgWith a minimalist piece of design, the clip does start with a tiny piece of elevated ramp. The cap bands and the rings follow the same equation till a ring separating the piston end concludes both dazzle and design. The clip is tension fit and carries a serial number and GERMANY along the ring. On its underside it may or may not carry the engraving of Pix, depending upon the year of manufacture. Montblanc included the trademark post 1997. There are a lot of Chinese fakes flooding both online and offline channels, which is why Montblanc has to come up with newer and innovative trademarks with every model. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-NRQ0HCyiSbE/VaEdpgbgWkI/AAAAAAAAEww/t6HaP1PAD-I/s1600/DSC_4304.jpgThe cap unscrews with a single turn revealing a dazzling two tone nib along with a striped ink window. I like the ink-windows very much. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-JDI6YLg1mQs/VaEeC3KPgeI/AAAAAAAAExI/PpEzAndAV40/s1600/DSC_4322.jpg The cap does mention MONTBLANC - MEISTERSTÜCK etched across the broader of the concentric golden bands, in a cross-hatched font while two thinner bands above and below render the differential aesthetics. The finial carries the white-star.http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-t_EFEBqFTIg/VaEdWzZ1XtI/AAAAAAAAEwg/tn6K260KlYI/s1600/CapC.jpg FILLING SYSTEM (6/6) The piston is distinguished by a golden band and has an easy and a hassle-free mechanism. The piston end unscrews with less than three rotations and as the white piston head moves along the ink-windows, ink gushes into the barrel. A brass connector gives the necessary weight to the barrel.http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-OOGMOsyTrIg/VaEd-CQOqHI/AAAAAAAAExA/0Y8dcje74k4/s1600/DSC_4323.jpg NIB - ALL THAT MATTERS (6/6) The dazzling two-two nib is tested by hand, and it comes in eight different widths including the common widths of EF, F, M & B. And this silvery rhodium finish provides both glitter and glamour. A golden decor runs along the shoulders of the nib and it converges across the outer tines onto an iridium tip, while the rhodium silvery finish diverges from the breather hole across the inside of the tines and over to the tail. A bounded layer of arabesques & curves segregates the rhodium and gold decors. Then, there is a dazzling white M logo resting inside the encircled star, above which rest the height of Mont Blanc peak, 4810 (m). This one is a fine nib and writes quite wet and smooth. The tail end specifies the composition (58.5% Au) of the gold-alloy used. Above it rest the specification 14K and brandname of MONTBLANC. There is no width specified on the nib itself, unlike others.http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-15f8N4cwztg/Vf0EnKnBu6I/AAAAAAAAFhM/Yve04cKG-ns/s1600/DSC_6351.jpgA standard black plastic feed with finely spaced fins (earlier ones had ebonite feeds) ensures a good ink buffer for the awesome wetness and prevents hard starts. By the way, I just love the ink windows.http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-tRJBu8G6-gw/Vf0Et4j5lZI/AAAAAAAAFhY/ffaTbAgFWvs/s1600/DSC_6360.jpg PHYSICS OF RELATIVITY (6/6) It does give a comfortable feel to write with the pen without posting the cap. The overall capped length is around 14.2 cm. The pen can be used posted without any feeling of top-heaviness as the weight of the cap is less than a third of the total weight, with a comfortable grip of 1.2 cm.Uncapped Length ~ 12.4 cmPosted Length ~ 15.6 cmNib Leverage ~ 2.4 cmOverall Weight ~ 31 g (Cap Weight ~ 9 g)Below are the pictures along with a Pelikan m805 and a Pilot Custom 823 for your reference. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9cEZUiQx1Ow/VaEeVgzlMiI/AAAAAAAAExQ/ebKpXBCOoak/s1600/DSC_4360.jpghttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/-b4ug3mQy5cY/VaEee7RkPyI/AAAAAAAAExg/JKVrY2iUfOc/s1600/DSC_4379.jpghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-IXL8Je6WvTI/VaEeZFRv8GI/AAAAAAAAExY/zsBQQ5L1UUM/s1600/DSC_4371.jpgECONOMIC VALUE (3/6) This one defies both logic & gravity and the pen retails at more than USD 750. The price puts most of the fountain pen people off, while getting a pre-owned one from your uncles (well nothing like that! or buying it at a good discount) can save some money. You can also get hold of a MB boutique sales person selling off some older generation demo pens at a good discount. When it comes to the internet, one has to be careful regarding the abundance of fakes in the online marketplaces and the best fakes are costly and are quite difficult to identify without experience. Value for money? I doubt. Heritage Value? High. You can probably pass on the pen to your next generation and they would still recognise it as a brand. Can I pass on the same emotional value with a say, Pilot Custom 845, outside of Japan? I doubt. This will probably need some internet searches, before one realizes the true value of the pen. OVERALL (5.2/6) The writing experience is amazing although I do find the pilot custom 823 and m805 being equally good when it comes to nibs of similar size and constituency. There is a hint of spring and softness in the nib and an absence of any line variation between the horizontal and vertical strokes. The lines dry relatively quickly with a MB Toffee Brown ink taking around 25 seconds on MD Paper. And you get a nice shading too!http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-dDdiKKFeJ94/Vf0ExcEcTAI/AAAAAAAAFhk/gsIvnhXgG20/s1600/DSC_6286.jpgComparatively, a custom 823 with a medium nib, draws a line, thinner than both 146 and m805 fine points and dries quickly. On a smooth MD paper with stock pelikan 4001 inks, it took more than 30 seconds to dry the dots put by the 146 (as well as the m805). Final Toffee Posehttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-aFyTIagg_s4/Vf0EyWgzXJI/AAAAAAAAFho/-d2kcXs6_UU/s1600/DSC_6304.jpg REFERENCES Montblanc WebsiteGentleman's GazetteForbes Article Model Numbers Thank you for going through the review. You can find some more pen and paraphernalia reviews here.
  18. In the last few months I have been using mostly pens with either Jowo or Bock steel nibs. I tend to prefer M or B nibs, although I do also stretch to F and stubs. Although F nibs are not my first choice except for fine notes, both Jowo and Bock F nibs are still enjoyable for me, as they are sufficiently smooth. I have a few Jowo 1.1 stubs, and although they are not bad either, I usually do have a preference for stubs with tipping. All in all both these brands make enjoyably smooth steel nibs in the F to stub range, which I do like using, and have several different pens which mount these. After a period of rotation over a few months of several different pens with Jowo/Bock steel nibs, last week I picked up a Bexley with a 14k gold nib, size M. The Bexley is an Equipose in a rather unusual green colour (called Colorado Green). Besides the unusual colour, the Bexley Equipose is quite a classic looking pen (with converter system). The design is classic cap over barrel, with no step-down barrel to section (which I find so annoying due to the way I hold my pens high up). The threads are smooth and the size of the pen is big enough to be very comfortable uncapped (I almost never post). After a long period of use of steel nibs, what does however strike me immediately on putting this pen/nib back to paper is the different way it writes. Ever so soft! It's not a matter of being smooth, it's not a matter of flex either (I don't usually look for flex when writing, although I can recognize flex/semiflex nibs), it's just much more relaxed and natural in a way. I don't feel as though I have to push, while I do somewhat with steel nibs, in comparison. This nib is no doubt lovely (14k M) and I had forgotten how much more enjoyable it is writing with it, compared to a group of various Jowo/Bock steel nibs (including some mounted on more recent Bexleys I own). The difference is subtle, but it's there absolutely! I'm not starting the steel vs gold topic again, I know, I do have a few gold nibs that are not so different from the a/m group of steel nibs in the way they behave... It's probably just that this is a heck of a lovely nib!
  19. RayCornett

    14K Vs. 18K Experience

    For those who have 149s with 14k nibs as well as 18k nibs which do you prefer and why? I have a chance to exchange my 149 with a 14k f-m nib for one with an 18k ef nib. I love the finer grind but am wondering if there are any differences that make it worth the exchange.
  20. Hi, there are lots of threads regarding the various models of the sailor profit/1911 etc... but I have been unable to find an answer to these questions. I've come close, but not quite. Sailor Profit Standard 14k zoom nib vs Sailor Profit Standard 21k zoom nib. Are the nibs the same size? Is the 21k nib a 'better quality' nib ? Smoother writer ? etc.. There are a lot of reviews using the 21k nib on the Pro Gear or the Profit (L) large but not the standard. There are some reviews Also if possible, a lot of people compare the 21k zoom to being capable of writing a BB line, others say a B. I guess it's a bit of personal opinion there but does the 14k zoom nib produce the same thickness of a line ? And are we talking a 'western' broad or BB, or something closer to a japanese B (western M) ? Thanks
  21. In these reviews I attempt to be as to-the-point as possible to give the reader a quick idea about the aspects of the pen that stood out to me. The Good: The pen has been crafted very well and I literally cannot find a flaw in the pen. The threads are smooth, the finishing is immaculate and the ability to eyedropper it is awesome! It's a home run in terms of quality and functionality. The Not-so-Good: The cap has metal in it making it a little heavy. The barrel, being relatively light, posting makes the pen back heavy. The Bad: These are numbered editions but not limited, I believe. Numbered or not, doesn't matter to me. But in this case it seems like a trick to create a hype or create a feeling of higher value than it is. I think it was unnecessary to number this pen and advertise it as such. It is great pen and holds it's own anyway. The numbering just opens a can of worms with people requesting specific numbers and the Goulet's not being able to honor such requests. The Bottom Line: Think of it as an non-numbered edition and buy it if you like ebonite pens that are well made. The numbering is just an unnecessary distraction on a great pen. Note: As pictured below, the nib on this pen is a 14K Conklin nib that did not come with the pen. I had this nib and found this pen to be a suitable home for the nib. These pens come with Goulet branded JoWo nibs.
  22. Hello pen friends, I just got this lovely little red pen and I need some help identifying it. It's lacqured brass with a 14k gold Sailor nib. It also has a captured/attached Sailor converter. With the cap on it measures 130 mm. Cap off, it is 122 mm long. There are no identifying marks on the cap or barrel. I did a quick search and it most resembles a Sailor Young Profit but it does not appear as though Young Profit has any models with lacquer bodies and 14k gold nibs. I've inked it with Montegrappa Bordeaux and it's a lovely writer. So is this a frankenpen of some sort? Special edition? I'm just curious. Any light you could shed on its identity is greatly appreciated.
  23. KingRoach

    Amicus Gold

    My understanding is that this is German, and so I'm posting this here: One of my favourite pens now even though quite a few things about it were things I wouldn't have chosen for myself. I am a complete sucker for something off-stream or weird or strange or one-off or just simply uncommon. The very REASON why I bought this pen was that it has a cork piston. I was like.. "Oh.. cork! Isn't that an old technology that is supposed to rot after some use? I'll have this." The cork and ink window were clean as new. I have since inked it up with black Parker Quink. The aesthetics of the pen make me fall in love with it rather quickly. Black, the pattern, the gold, the pattern, the blind cap, the clip, the pattern... not a big fan of having the name of the pen engraved on the cap but you get used to it. At least it's not the name of an association. The section is engraved EF and 3, which is likely the size of the nib. The nib has very noticeable flex despite still being a sturdy hardish nib. The feed is beautiful too. Everything about this pen works well together. Writing experience: scratchy as hell but that is due to slight misalignment. I may just have fixed this, though. If flexed, it is harder to control the EF lines. Ink flow is HUGE, and the nib and feed are always SOAKED! When I write with this pen, I feel like I'm writing with a soaked dip nib, and I love that. The section, length and girth are made as if they had my hand to design a pen for. I couldn't have made one like this for myself myself. Amicus Gold, 14kt no.3 EF. I've now run out of the first fill of ink. Ran out rather quickly as this is, as I said, an extremely wet pen. Do I change the ink, or stick to only one single ink for this pen? I'm thinking about the cork and any required maintenance. I hope you like it.
  24. This one is my all time favourite pen and one of my first fountain pens with a gold nib. The Custom 74 (C74) was released as in 1992, sporting a Pilot#5 14k nib. I was planning to review it for a long long time but thanks to all the other pens, it never got the attention it truly deserves. Here is a link of the review on my blog: The Pilot Custom 74 Review The C74 was launched 74 years after the company’s inception (i.e. 1918), and as usual it does carry the first two digits of the model number as ‘74’ and the third digit is by default ‘1’ usually refers price at launch of the pen (i.e 1 X JPY 10,000). The demonstrators were released much later with the coloured ones specifically meant for the US market. I have always felt that the C74 along with the Custom Heritage 92 are the best starter premium pens. The C74 (for the Asian market) comes packaged in a standard pilot gift box (Z-CR-GN) which is more of a protection than presentation and the pen also reverberates with this understatement. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-CdTw8q1vIis/VdllHrQATMI/AAAAAAAAFLo/76Vr7h-W_nY/s1600/DSC_5391.jpg DESIGN - THE CLASSICAL CIGAR (5/6) The C74 comes in four standard designs of glossy resin - Black, Deep Green, Deep Red (or bordeaux), and Deep Blue, all in gold plated trims. The resin material feels strong though not heavy. There are also the clear and coloured demonstrators (blue, orange, violet and smoke) with silver trims and smoky finials, available at higher price points. I would personally prefer a piston-filling CH92 when it comes to demos. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-7owyZpWqHFA/Vdlkli2RgeI/AAAAAAAAFLQ/j7xt6YQDpcU/s1600/3custom74.jpg The cylindrical cigar starts with rounded off finial and a gold plated clip/ring syncing nicely with concentric cap bands before concluding with a golden dazzle at the end of the barrel. The glossy red resin shines moderately under light, preserving its business like look. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-dfpSmKIV_ck/VdllGuZxL_I/AAAAAAAAFLg/c_8AAGUCiS0/s1600/DSC_5399.jpg The cap is light and unscrews with little less than two turns, revealing a dazzling golden nib. The grip section is moulded from the same resin and a golden ring announces the beginning. But as usual the nib dazzles out from the rest of the pen. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-dIFZH-SAprQ/VdllgLOHF8I/AAAAAAAAFMI/N4w8M93o3Wo/s1600/DSC_5413.jpg The two injection-moulding threads are somewhat visible at the threads of the barrel and grip. I would have preferred polishing them off, through there is little room for argument at this price point. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-2DxF8tHZqyE/VdllVrd8KzI/AAAAAAAAFL4/IFuABBIT-To/s1600/DSC_5502.jpg The cap with a rounded off finial preserves a classical look. A few things etched across a lower centre band include the model name of CUSTOM 74 and PILOT MADE IN JAPAN, separated by a Star. An concentric narrow band above renders some differential aesthetics. The clip is tension-fit and has the shape of an inverted triangle, ending up with a golden sphere. PILOT is engraved vertically at the top. The design of the clip is reminiscent of Parker Big Red pens of the 70s. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-1IH-E5yK_7g/Vdll5YY5XoI/AAAAAAAAFM4/u3fKyPHkNF8/s1600/cap74.jpg FILLING SYSTEM (6/6) The barrel unscrews from the section with four and a half turns. As you can observe the section has metal threading syncing with the resin threads of the barrel. You can also see one of the feeble lines of injection moulding on the outer threads of the barrel. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-e6XOmkCaIkE/VdllSjI7VII/AAAAAAAAFLw/c1584Mm5kK8/s1600/DSC_5488.jpg The pen takes all pilot converters CON-20 (0.9 mL), CON-50 (0.7 mL) & CON-70 (1 mL) along with pilot proprietary cartridges (0.9 mL). I have used the included CON-70 converter with this pen with a push button filling mechanism. Mind you, the ink bottle with have some froth during the otherwise fun filling exercise. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Yi21VMoZFrA/VdllqqfN5lI/AAAAAAAAFMo/lXrTL-kLDqA/s1600/DSC_5515.jpg NIB - ALL THAT MATTERS (6/6) The nib is friction-fit and comes in a standard 14k design across four stock widths - EF, F, M & B. In addition to these four there are eight special widths available across SF, FM, SFM, M, SM, BB, MS & C. It’s comes rhodiated for the silver trimmed demos although the widths are limited to F, M & B. The tail end of the nib specifies the month and year of manufacture. It has a standard scrollwork where the elongated hexagonal imprint separates the design from the outer shoulders and tines, with a decor running inside its circumference, encompassing the circular breather hole. The branding and nib specifications of PILOT, 14k-585 (58.5% Au Alloy) along with the nib size and width are imprinted below the breather hole. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-t6aCbVsp20o/Vdlll5rR7zI/AAAAAAAAFMQ/fMnBP6Y6CAw/s1600/DSC_5538.jpg A standard bluish grey plastic feed with moderately spaced fins delivers a buffer capacity and a decently sized feeder hole gives a decent ink suction. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-y4hBDIq9FNk/Vdllm9BgJqI/AAAAAAAAFMY/Q25DT6d8D5Q/s1600/DSC_5551.jpg The only difference I find between the C74 nibs and the rhodiated nibs of the CH92, is on the softness front, which makes the C74 nib more delightful. PHYSICS OF IT (6/6) – RELATIVELY SPEAKING I do not know why but the cigar shape of a pen does give an extremely comfortable feel to my hands. The cap weighs only 8 grams. It’s a comfortable grip section with around 1 cm girth. For my hands the un-posted C74 lacks a bit of weight rather than length. Uncapped Length ~ 12.5 cm Posted Length ~ 15.5 cm Nib Leverage ~ 2 cm Overall Weight ~ 20 g Capped, uncapped and posted comparisons with a few similar pens in terms of dimension and heft like the Custom Heritage 92 and the Pelikan m605 go below for your reference. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJzLYZJXINc/VZwdbOWPLMI/AAAAAAAAEvU/Cx0-Bfye-o8/s1600/DSC_4256.jpghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-I0dLszXTRNI/VZwdlOG5djI/AAAAAAAAEvc/vFO5zr9WD5A/s1600/DSC_4259.jpghttp://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BWLWFs_-pzM/VZwdtlyizTI/AAAAAAAAEvk/MofrsO9Twts/s1600/DSC_4266.jpg ECONOMIC VALUE (6/6) The C74 retails at around USD 160 for the rhodiated demonstrator versions in the US, although the glossy resin versions sell at USD 100 or less, in Japanese shops like Engeika or Rakuten. I had bought the first pen a long back for close to USD 100 from Engeika’s Indian Arm - Pensindia. I do find the C74, a terrific value for money. OVERALL (5.8/6) This 14k nib is the smoothest of all my nibs and it has a moderately wet flow. The nib is sturdy and does not have any variation between horizontal and vertical lines. This medium nib has an exquisite level of softness with a fair amount of spring which makes it phenomenal. These wet lines take almost 25 secs to dry a wet ink like Diamine Majestic Blue on MD paper. These grids are 5 mm squares. Overall, a must buy pen! http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-dtfShFpOBiE/Vdll_ArG4-I/AAAAAAAAFNA/lMVgIXuTKr0/s1600/DSC_5572.jpg Thank you for going through the review. You can find some more pen and paraphernalia reviews here. ADORABLE REVIEWS FPN Review Blue Demo
  25. If you ask me, I am not really much into pocket pens. But this is a pocket pen I could never ignore, thanks to the excellent reviews from none other than Hari. I doubt if it could be a desirable starter fountain pen, but I do find it as a great VFM, given the stunningly big 14k gold nib. And finally it is good friends with my MTN pen holder. Here is a copy of this review on my blog: Elite 95S Review The Elite 95S (or E95S in US) was released as Pilot’s 95th anniversary pen in 2013, sporting a Pilot 14k nib, which is larger than a standard Pilot#5 nib. The Elite S was originally a pocket pen designed by Pilot in 1968. The second run of these pens occurred in 1974. The 95S is more of a evolution of the Elite S fountain pen and as it was launched 95 years after the company’s inception (i.e. 1918) it does carry the first two digits of the model number as ‘95’ with the S and the third digit is by default ‘1’ usually refers price at launch of the pen (i.e 1 X JPY 10,000). It’s referred as the E95S in the US market due to copyright obligations. The Elite 95S (for the Asian market, Model #FES-1MM-DR/B-EF/F/M) comes packaged in a standard pilot gift box (Z-CR-GN) which is usually more of a protection rather than presentation. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mVy918MFP7Q/VfAnBI0ZpKI/AAAAAAAAFdk/WinvMivuiDM/s1600/DSC_6068.jpg DESIGN - FOR YOUR POCKET (6/6) The E95S comes in two standard designs of acrylic resin with a double anodised aluminium cap - Black, Deep Red (or burgundy) in gold plated trims. The acrylic resin material feels sturdy but light, I guess a defining feature for a light pocket pen sharing one dimension with your shirt pocket. You will definitely like the E95S if you like Kaweco Sport pens. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-E7QnDJIvgSY/VfAnA6IemxI/AAAAAAAAFdg/GFL7E97DuLI/s1600/DSC_6074.jpg The tapered geometry starts with a flattened finial of a pearly cap (with a hint of red shade) with a gold plated clip syncing nicely with concentric cap bands and a differentiated ring from the section before it concludes with burgundy of the barrel. The glossy red resin shines moderately under light and creates a good contrast with the cap. This pen seems to preserve a vintage look both in terms of design and make. The cap is light and and can be pulled out quite smoothly, revealing a big dazzling gold nib. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-bpP3S0t-IZ8/VfAnAQrDXFI/AAAAAAAAFdY/syxBzXN6o9w/s1600/DSC_6084.jpg The grip section is moulded from the same burgundy resin and a thick golden step announces its beginning as well as the end stop for posting the cap. But as usual, the nib dazzles out the rest. The posted pen gains considerable length and renders both beauty and a deep red contrast to the pearly finish of the cap. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-tu7FwfaAig0/VfAnH6CGu0I/AAAAAAAAFds/PtDIhpr0dnw/s1600/DSC_6088.jpg The snap cap with a slightly domed finial preserves a rather classical look. A few things etched across the lower band of the cap includes the model name of Elite on one side and PILOT & JAPAN on the other. Two concentric bands of golden paint render aesthetics to the entire pen, as the cap is quite significant for this pen. The spring loaded clip with an associate loop, has a rectangular top view with geometrical cuts. It’s engraved with PILOT vertically. The design of the clip is reminiscent of older Pilot pens. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-6myhhnZXmqs/VfAnRhk2fYI/AAAAAAAAFew/NRpYMhDpeck/s1600/cap.jpg FILLING SYSTEM (5/6) The barrel unscrews from the section which has a metallic insert carrying the necessary threads for syncing with the resin threads inside the barrel. One of those rare pens, in which the section is considerably longer than its barrel. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-R9nqKFombjg/VfAnItHuCtI/AAAAAAAAFd8/BfKRHQF7WfI/s1600/DSC_6108.jpg The pen takes only pilot CON-20 (0.5 mL) converter and pilot proprietary cartridges (0.9 mL) because of its size limitations. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Hl1jSygOJJE/VfAnIlye93I/AAAAAAAAFeA/GRbeD8Gu5OY/s1600/DSC_6110.jpg NIB - ALL THAT MATTERS (5/6) The nib is inset and comes in a 14k design across three stock widths - EF, F & M. The tail end of the nib specifies the month and year of manufacture. It has no other scrollwork apart from branding and nib specs. By the way, the productions are limited to 5000 pieces and that’s why you mostly see 413 (April-2013) as timestamp (or monthstamp) on these nibs. All branding and nib specs namely 14k-585 (58.5% Au Alloy), PILOT, along with the nib width & country of manufacture i.e JAPAN are imprinted below the breather hole. The tines are relatively short, given the longish nib. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-YJBZbvTTBLI/VfAnJL8huMI/AAAAAAAAFeE/92C_DapDp7c/s1600/DSC_6114.jpg A partially enclosed or rather hooded bluish grey plastic feed with big feeder hole provides ink suction and a decent buffer. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-B2HUUDsP73c/VfAnKTv9ieI/AAAAAAAAFeM/7AILQMYxqrA/s1600/DSC_6120.jpg PHYSICS OF IT (5/6) – RELATIVELY SPEAKING This is a pocket pen and measures only around 12 cm closed. It is meant to be posted for writing and in addition to the length the cap does add some weight. Though the cap itself is quite light and weighs only 6 grams, the snap mechanism does make it a quick note scribbler. The grip is comfortably tapered ending with a longish nib. Closed ~ 12 cm Uncapped Length ~ 10.5 cm Posted Length ~ 14.7 cm Nib Leverage ~ 2.4 cm Overall Weight ~ 17 g (without converter) Capped, uncapped and posted comparisons with a Pelikan m2XX/4xx go below for your reference. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JJ0soCVTLV8/VfAnO3mOo2I/AAAAAAAAFec/g9R4qaz8Nms/s1600/DSC_6124.jpg http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MdcN6mtgxuQ/VfAnPPYxQgI/AAAAAAAAFeg/0I-4FVIG11s/s1600/DSC_6128.jpghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Cc7yiDx_MUE/VfAnPfe_giI/AAAAAAAAFek/IYqa_kJJDnI/s1600/DSC_6132.jpg ECONOMIC VALUE (6/6) The E95S retails at around USD 136 in the US, although it sell at USD 100 or even less, in Japanese shops like Engeika or Rakuten. I had bought the first pen from Engeika’s Indian Arm - Pensindia. It’s a definite VFM pen. OVERALL (5.4/6) The fine nib has some feedback but is graced with a wet flow. Although pilot does not associate any softness with these nibs, these nibs are quite springy and have a decent amount of flex, the leverage coming from their unique shape. The verticals can grow thicker with slight pressure. The nib has a moderate flow, taking less than 25 seconds to dry a wet Diamine Majestic Blue ink on MD Paper. The paper grids are 5 mm squares. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-iBITKFR13ak/VfAnSeFtIyI/AAAAAAAAFe0/ySbwApClgHw/s1600/DSC_6133.jpg Thank you for going through the review. You can find some more pen and paraphernalia reviews here. ADORABLE REVIEWS Hari's Review of Red Elite 95S Black





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