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Found 16 results

  1. collectorofmanythings

    Pilot E95S (Elite 95S) Review

    Hello! First of all, this is only my third review on FPN, so if you can please leave constructive criticism below! I would love to improve the quality of my reviews. The Pilot E95S seems to be like the least expensive gold nib pen that is consistently offered here in the U.S. . The only cheaper one I can think of is the Platinum PTL-5000A, which I would love if it was consistently offered in the U.S., but they seem to constantly discontinue it. So, this is a very popular first gold nib pen. It was my second gold nib, so I did get it relatively early in my fountain pen hobby. For a quick summary of the review, I like this pen. I don’t love it, but it’s is great value, and I definitely recommend it. Design and Build Quality (8.5/10) For the most part, this design is great. It is slim, but comfortable, has a great inlaid nib (which I love), is compact, but bigger when posted, and the feeling of capping and uncapping is great. But, Pilot’s black resin does not hold up to the little metal things on the inside of the cap that hold it on. It has fine scratches on it, which are pretty apparent. Now, I am one of those people who sort of like that, and don’t really want pens to look brand new, I want them to look like I used them. But I can understand how this can annoy some people. That’s why it’s a 8.5/10, instead of a 10/10. Nib Performance and Writing Experience (9/10) This nib is great. I have a fine nib, which is 14k gold and inlaid. It is smooth, and quite soft. I would call this a flex, semi-flex, or soft nib, but a quite soft nib. By that I mean that you can get some line variation, but not that much where you can use it for calligraphy, just a bouncy writing experience. The only thing is it is just a bit particular with inks. Both Noodler’s Walnut and Diamine Chocolate Brown were just a bit too dry for it, and it had some skipping. But all Herbin, Jacques Herbin, and Iroshizuku work great with it from my experience. With them the pen is not especially wet, but I wouldn’t call it dry either. With the writing sample, I used Jacques Herbin Terre d’Ombre, which is currently my favorite ink but might be replaced by Robert Oster Caffe Crema when that ink sample gets to me, and on 52gsm cream Tomoe River Paper. Conclusion This a great pen, and a great value! I highly recommend it. It’s really great! Little Note- It seems like every place I go to except for JetPens sells it as the Pilot E95S for $136, but JetPens sells it as the Pilot Elite 95S for $136 as well. Just a little thing. Edit- It was to commemorate the 95th anniversary of Pilot, but is not a limited edition. It also comes with the Pilot CON-40, but can fit the discontinued CON-20. Now the pictures: The second to last photo shows scratches on the barrel, and the last one shows the metal things on the inside of the cap.
  2. I'm loving my new Sailor Pro Gear <H-M>. So now of course I am curious about Sailor pens with <S-M>. But I can't find them for sale anywhere. Do they even exist? 21k? Which models? Maybe as a replacement nib?
  3. Hi everyone, I'm looking to get a CH912 as my new everyday use pen, but I'm taken aback by the sheer number of nib choices. I have a two main questions: - What is the FA nib like as a daily writer? Is it relatively smooth? I have heard of flow issues regarding this nib. I am not a tremendously fast writer, but regular skipping would be rather annoying. - How does the Wavily nib compare to the SM, or just the regular medium nib? Is it any smoother? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  4. From the album: Translated third-party content

    In contrast to the FA nib, which is designed to be used with only light hand pressure — irrespective of whether that produces sufficient line variation to satisfy the individual user — the Elabo's (or Falcon's) nib is designed to withstand heavier hand pressure in writing. Source page: https://www.pilot.co.jp/promotion/library/014

    © Pilot Corporation

  5. Hello again to all my FPN friends, I know anytime you use the word "best" for something as subjective as a fountain pen you'll get varied responses, but that's what I'm hoping for. Here's my question for you all: In your opinion, what is the best gold-nibbed Chinese pen (a Chinese branded pen, not just a pen made in China) available on the market today? Along with your recommendation, please explain why the nib feels great to you and what you like about both the pen and nib. What does the nib feel like on the paper? How much feedback? Including that information will help others decide whether the pen is a good choice for them. Thanks in advance for your contributions!
  6. I am considering getting a Pelikan M1000. I was looking for advice on the FB FPN and there were comments about how wet the pen and how it was not meant to do much line variation. So........ How wet is it? If too wet can that be fixed with different ink or other. How much line variation can you safely get?
  7. Hi Everyone, My problem is that I prefer hardcover journals for daily writing, but move around a lot so they are too heavy and impractical for my kind of lifestyle. Therefore, I'm thinking about switching to something more portable like Midori A5 journals. The issue is that I don't like writing on floppy surfaces and often need the hardcover to act as a writing surface when I'm out and about. Does such a thing exist as a leather notebook cover that is stiff enough or has hard enough surfaces to make a softcover journal feel like a hardback? Thanks for any suggestions!
  8. This one is my all time favourite pen and one of my first fountain pens with a gold nib. The Custom 74 (C74) was released as in 1992, sporting a Pilot#5 14k nib. I was planning to review it for a long long time but thanks to all the other pens, it never got the attention it truly deserves. Here is a link of the review on my blog: The Pilot Custom 74 Review The C74 was launched 74 years after the company’s inception (i.e. 1918), and as usual it does carry the first two digits of the model number as ‘74’ and the third digit is by default ‘1’ usually refers price at launch of the pen (i.e 1 X JPY 10,000). The demonstrators were released much later with the coloured ones specifically meant for the US market. I have always felt that the C74 along with the Custom Heritage 92 are the best starter premium pens. The C74 (for the Asian market) comes packaged in a standard pilot gift box (Z-CR-GN) which is more of a protection than presentation and the pen also reverberates with this understatement. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-CdTw8q1vIis/VdllHrQATMI/AAAAAAAAFLo/76Vr7h-W_nY/s1600/DSC_5391.jpg DESIGN - THE CLASSICAL CIGAR (5/6) The C74 comes in four standard designs of glossy resin - Black, Deep Green, Deep Red (or bordeaux), and Deep Blue, all in gold plated trims. The resin material feels strong though not heavy. There are also the clear and coloured demonstrators (blue, orange, violet and smoke) with silver trims and smoky finials, available at higher price points. I would personally prefer a piston-filling CH92 when it comes to demos. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-7owyZpWqHFA/Vdlkli2RgeI/AAAAAAAAFLQ/j7xt6YQDpcU/s1600/3custom74.jpg The cylindrical cigar starts with rounded off finial and a gold plated clip/ring syncing nicely with concentric cap bands before concluding with a golden dazzle at the end of the barrel. The glossy red resin shines moderately under light, preserving its business like look. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-dfpSmKIV_ck/VdllGuZxL_I/AAAAAAAAFLg/c_8AAGUCiS0/s1600/DSC_5399.jpg The cap is light and unscrews with little less than two turns, revealing a dazzling golden nib. The grip section is moulded from the same resin and a golden ring announces the beginning. But as usual the nib dazzles out from the rest of the pen. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-dIFZH-SAprQ/VdllgLOHF8I/AAAAAAAAFMI/N4w8M93o3Wo/s1600/DSC_5413.jpg The two injection-moulding threads are somewhat visible at the threads of the barrel and grip. I would have preferred polishing them off, through there is little room for argument at this price point. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-2DxF8tHZqyE/VdllVrd8KzI/AAAAAAAAFL4/IFuABBIT-To/s1600/DSC_5502.jpg The cap with a rounded off finial preserves a classical look. A few things etched across a lower centre band include the model name of CUSTOM 74 and PILOT MADE IN JAPAN, separated by a Star. An concentric narrow band above renders some differential aesthetics. The clip is tension-fit and has the shape of an inverted triangle, ending up with a golden sphere. PILOT is engraved vertically at the top. The design of the clip is reminiscent of Parker Big Red pens of the 70s. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-1IH-E5yK_7g/Vdll5YY5XoI/AAAAAAAAFM4/u3fKyPHkNF8/s1600/cap74.jpg FILLING SYSTEM (6/6) The barrel unscrews from the section with four and a half turns. As you can observe the section has metal threading syncing with the resin threads of the barrel. You can also see one of the feeble lines of injection moulding on the outer threads of the barrel. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-e6XOmkCaIkE/VdllSjI7VII/AAAAAAAAFLw/c1584Mm5kK8/s1600/DSC_5488.jpg The pen takes all pilot converters CON-20 (0.9 mL), CON-50 (0.7 mL) & CON-70 (1 mL) along with pilot proprietary cartridges (0.9 mL). I have used the included CON-70 converter with this pen with a push button filling mechanism. Mind you, the ink bottle with have some froth during the otherwise fun filling exercise. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Yi21VMoZFrA/VdllqqfN5lI/AAAAAAAAFMo/lXrTL-kLDqA/s1600/DSC_5515.jpg NIB - ALL THAT MATTERS (6/6) The nib is friction-fit and comes in a standard 14k design across four stock widths - EF, F, M & B. In addition to these four there are eight special widths available across SF, FM, SFM, M, SM, BB, MS & C. It’s comes rhodiated for the silver trimmed demos although the widths are limited to F, M & B. The tail end of the nib specifies the month and year of manufacture. It has a standard scrollwork where the elongated hexagonal imprint separates the design from the outer shoulders and tines, with a decor running inside its circumference, encompassing the circular breather hole. The branding and nib specifications of PILOT, 14k-585 (58.5% Au Alloy) along with the nib size and width are imprinted below the breather hole. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-t6aCbVsp20o/Vdlll5rR7zI/AAAAAAAAFMQ/fMnBP6Y6CAw/s1600/DSC_5538.jpg A standard bluish grey plastic feed with moderately spaced fins delivers a buffer capacity and a decently sized feeder hole gives a decent ink suction. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-y4hBDIq9FNk/Vdllm9BgJqI/AAAAAAAAFMY/Q25DT6d8D5Q/s1600/DSC_5551.jpg The only difference I find between the C74 nibs and the rhodiated nibs of the CH92, is on the softness front, which makes the C74 nib more delightful. PHYSICS OF IT (6/6) – RELATIVELY SPEAKING I do not know why but the cigar shape of a pen does give an extremely comfortable feel to my hands. The cap weighs only 8 grams. It’s a comfortable grip section with around 1 cm girth. For my hands the un-posted C74 lacks a bit of weight rather than length. Uncapped Length ~ 12.5 cm Posted Length ~ 15.5 cm Nib Leverage ~ 2 cm Overall Weight ~ 20 g Capped, uncapped and posted comparisons with a few similar pens in terms of dimension and heft like the Custom Heritage 92 and the Pelikan m605 go below for your reference. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJzLYZJXINc/VZwdbOWPLMI/AAAAAAAAEvU/Cx0-Bfye-o8/s1600/DSC_4256.jpghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-I0dLszXTRNI/VZwdlOG5djI/AAAAAAAAEvc/vFO5zr9WD5A/s1600/DSC_4259.jpghttp://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BWLWFs_-pzM/VZwdtlyizTI/AAAAAAAAEvk/MofrsO9Twts/s1600/DSC_4266.jpg ECONOMIC VALUE (6/6) The C74 retails at around USD 160 for the rhodiated demonstrator versions in the US, although the glossy resin versions sell at USD 100 or less, in Japanese shops like Engeika or Rakuten. I had bought the first pen a long back for close to USD 100 from Engeika’s Indian Arm - Pensindia. I do find the C74, a terrific value for money. OVERALL (5.8/6) This 14k nib is the smoothest of all my nibs and it has a moderately wet flow. The nib is sturdy and does not have any variation between horizontal and vertical lines. This medium nib has an exquisite level of softness with a fair amount of spring which makes it phenomenal. These wet lines take almost 25 secs to dry a wet ink like Diamine Majestic Blue on MD paper. These grids are 5 mm squares. Overall, a must buy pen! http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-dtfShFpOBiE/Vdll_ArG4-I/AAAAAAAAFNA/lMVgIXuTKr0/s1600/DSC_5572.jpg Thank you for going through the review. You can find some more pen and paraphernalia reviews here. ADORABLE REVIEWS FPN Review Blue Demo
  9. Hello all! I hope you can help me out. I recently bought a Sailor Profit Standard MF with a 21k nib and a Platinum 3776 Chartres Blue with a Soft Fine 14k nib. Problem is, my platinum skips a lot and feels scratchy while writing. I need to apply some pressure in order for the nib not to skip while writing. I also tried the Sailor, and it is a completely different experience, it has a little bit of feedback but writes smoothly. I know this terms are very subjective, but at least I can tell you the feeling of the comparison. Sailor's nib feels great, like feedback, whilst the platinum nib feels scratchy and skips. I did a small writing sample where I first applied almost no pressure and then I did. Is my Platinum Nib defective or is it that I just don't know how to use the soft fine nib?
  10. I recently purchased two brand new platinum 3776's with 14K soft fine nibs. One in the rhodium finish and the other in the gold. Out of the box the one with the rhodium finish was remarkably softer than the gold. Is this a case of natural levels of variance within nib manufacturing or does is the rhodium one known to have greater softness? I did not read anything to that effect before purchasing.
  11. Omnicloud0321

    Choosing Between Sf And Sfm (Pilot)

    Hello FPN! I just signed up but I have been lurking and reading all over and agonizing over nib choice as this is my first "step up" pen. I have decided on a Custom Heritage 912 (or maybe a 91 since I'm not getting the more esoteric WA, FA, SU, MS, but I like the larger nib) but as the title states, I can't decide between SF and SFM for a daily writer. I have Metros in F & M, a Safari in EF, and Preppy's in F & M. The Preppy F is too thin and dry for me, while the Preppy M is too bold and wet. The Safari is actually near to my ideal, which would be a bit thinner. Similarly, I like something a hair thicker than the Metro F. The Metro F I find gives a little too much feedback while the Metro M writes like a dream, has a great line on Rhodia but too thick on Moleskine, for example. I think a rigid steel FM would have been a good Goldilocks nib for me with in between line width and smoothness, but I've read and seen examples that soft and 14K nibs from Pilot are wetter so I am leaning towards soft fine at the moment. The Goulet nib nook (screenshot) examples of 14k fines and 912 soft fine seem almost like the Metro medium though... My only concern after line width is smoothness. Also, on another note, are the stars on the rhodium cap band only on the North American version? I probably will be getting my pen from j-subculture and the pictures of Japanese market pens show empty space where the stars would be (I prefer this). I also have noticed that it's "Custom Heritage 912" in Japan and simply "Custom 912" in America.
  12. Hedgehogs4Me

    Softest/flexiest Pelikan 400 Nibs?

    Hi guys, looking at potentially getting a Pelikan 400 sometime soon, but, of course, there are so many differnet ones that have been made. Friction fit script, screw in unit script, logo, logo in 400N, logo in 400NN, logo in 400NN M&K... which ones usually will have the most flexibility (or easiest flex)? I won't be using this for calligraphy or anything, but I do like to put some flair on my signatures and writing every so often and I'd love to have some breathing room for how far I can push it. Thanks! (Also, is there anything else I should know before buying one? This kind of purchase always makes me nervous!)
  13. Really contemplating on purchasing a Pilot/Namiki Falcon. Never owned a gold nib before and was wondering if you guys could help me out in selecting the right nib size. So long story short, the very first fountain pen I purchased was a Pilot DPN-70 Desk pen (almost similar to the platinum carbon desk pen). I really adore the line it lays down but it tends to be a little scratchy (i eventually smoothened it with mylar and it writes like a dream, but writes with a thicker and wetter line). I will be buying a namiki falcon but I have absolutely no idea as to which nib size I should buy, should I go for the soft fine or the soft extra fine? Is the soft extra fine nib on the namiki falcon scratchy when compared to the soft fine? I recently purchased mylar paper from goulet pens (no affiliation) and smoothened all your my nibs and I am loving how smooth they run with almost no feedback and i have got so used to it! However, I would not want to risk smoothening the nib on the falcon with mylar (if i do purchase it). I want it smooth out of the box. I write with almost light pressure (probably light to medium). So what would you suggest? Soft extra fine vs Soft fine? I have seen the writing samples on goulet pens and for me it just boils down to how comfortable the nib is, and in short it should glide across the paper with no pressure. Are there any owners of the Pilot/Namiki Falcon who own the pen in Soft extra fine or extra fine, and could share their experience with the pen in terms of: Scratchiness, feedback and smoothness? This would definitely help me in deciding on which nib size to go for! Thanks in advance!
  14. Good morning everyone... I am new here, but certainlynot new to fountain pens. I'm trying to investigate papers and this is my trouble: the well-regarded Rhodia and Clairefontaine for me have 2 problems: 1. that brilliant/stark white is very aggressive 2. they feel very hard under the nib, with no softness whatsoever - meaning the ink line appears to just sit there rather than become one with the paper (waterman, diamine, whatever). Am I describing this right? I'd like a paper which feels softer under the pen, draws- the- nib- in kindda thing (and dodn't mean ink feathering dangers). Any thoughts? many thanks.
  15. I was wondering if you guys knew about a pen, vintage or modern, that was under around 80 dollars that had a soft or semi flex nib? I wanted to get a good everyday writer before jumping to a Lamy 2000, Namiki Falcon, or any other flagship model.
  16. I have both a Fine Nib, Metal Pilot/Namiki Falcon, as well as a Stipula Model T ( It's a Titanium Nib, sorta Medium in size, and with some pressure it is semi flex/soft) Everyone and their brother talks about Flex and either Vintage or the Falcon. I'd like to hear some pen nerds feedback on other options, what else is out there?, and what are they like? I was checking out the new flex nibs at Edison, featured here: http://edisonpen.com/index.cfm/2013/6/27/Edison-Offering-Richard-Binder-14k-Full-Flex-Nibs These look promising, however I really dont care for the look of most Edison pens they would go on. I much prefer the look of say, a Mont Blanc, or the metal Falcon - sleek, and modern. I'd love to be surprised by a pen I've never heard of or researched! Anyone have any recommendations?





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