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Found 7 results

  1. kharrisma

    Chipped-Tip Regrinding?

    Hi Forum Folke, I recently picked up a Stratford "77" button-filler in fairly decent shape, except for the tip. The left tine has about half of the tipping material chipped off. There also appears to be a slight (15 degree or so) bend right at the tip, just behind the tipping material, but it's so even on both tines that it might have been manufactured that way (I have a Sheaffer Triumph that has similarly curved tips, though those are turned up rather than down... I mistakenly straightened them out before finding out that this upturn was deliberate. They survived being re-curved. Another lesson learned.) Anyway, is anyone aware of a decent tutorial on re-shaping a chipped tip? All of the stuff I have been able to scare up involves a really wrecked tip being turned into an untipped italic nib, or assumes that the tip is intact, but rough and in need of smoothing, or reshaping a broader tip to a finer one. Nothing dealing with partially missing tip material. I'd just send it off to someone that specializes in such things, but for two reasons: A), I like to learn these things as I go; it's a valuable skill to have when you're pursuing this hobby on a shoestring budget, and , as I understand it, Stratford is a second- or third-tier pen, of little value today, so investing a minimum of $60 to $80 or more to have the tip professionally restored isn't really a sensible option, not in my case, anyway. It's not even a flexible tip (it has a small amount of give under moderate pressure... a stiff semi-flex at best), which makes the prospect of a relatively expensive fix even less appealing. I'd attach pics, but I don't have any capability of taking macro pics that would show the tips in enough detail. Thanks for the read and any advice / pointers / links or what have you!
  2. Hi Everyone, I always use fpnibs.com as my source for JoWo nibs which they custom grind to whatever I want, but they don't offer Bock nibs. Is there anyone out that that not only sells Bock nibs but will also custom grind them for you? Thanks!
  3. This is my first attempt to regrind a nib and i wanted to share it with you. I have always had difficulties finding a really fine nib that would suit my need and taste. The western fine nibs are more like a medium to me, and the japanese fine nib i bought ( pilot 78g) is not fine enough. To solve this issue i searched for a very low cost pen, but with a nice look, and i discovered the Dollar 717i fountain pen that has a medium nib. It is a really nice demonstrator pen, with piston filling mechanism that hold 1,2 milliliters of ink, and i bought about 20 pens for 18€ on a lot sale on ebay. I had only sandpaper available for this attempt, in particular 1200 grit paper, i know it is not the right one, is too heavy, but i wanted to give it a try. Armed with patience and after watching this online guide, i started grinding the italic nib and i ended with a result nicer than i would have expected. After that result i was inspired to try to grind the medium nib of the dollar pen to a fine/extra-fine, i used the same starting tecnique for the italic nib, but later i went by inspiration, and adjustment by adjustment i obtained what i consider a nice fine nib how i like it. I am waiting to receive a package with a 40x magnifier to better see what i am doing when i will try to grind some more nibs the next time. I still need to smooth better the nibs , in particular the fine/extrafine, because they are not scratchy, but give more feedback than i like! What can i use to smooth the nibs without changing them? If someone know material largely available in italy or at least in europe, and cheap, it would be great! I found that i really love the fine italic nib Here are some picture of the pens and a writing sample: Black pen= Original Dollar pen with no modifications to the Nib Red Pen= Dollar pen with Fine/extrafine grinded Nib Blue Pen= Dollar pen with Fine italic grinded Nib For scale the square's side is 5 millimeters long http://s25.postimg.org/g4cutvce7/IMG_20140222_152634.jpg http://s25.postimg.org/yz8lkacfz/IMG_20140222_151952.jpg http://s25.postimg.org/46bafz8n3/IMG_20140222_152042.jpg http://s25.postimg.org/rhze52mwv/IMG_20140222_152319.jpg
  4. Hi all, I'm considering purchasing a pen that has a double broad nib that I'm told has been ground to a crisp italic. I've used cursive italics and still find them a bit sharp on the edges for me and would prefer a smooth cursive italic (or even a stub). Is it possible to regrind the nib to a smooth cursive italic? I'd certainly be willing to give up some of the width of the nib to do so since it started as a double broad. Thanks for the advice.
  5. Nappeunoppa

    Pendleton Regrind On A Soft Nib?

    Hello! I recently found a Pilot Custom 74 for sale for a nice price, and it's equipped with a Soft Fine nib. For anyone who has ever had their pens reground by Mr. Pendleton, do you know if it is possible to get a BLS grind from that Soft Fine nib? And if you have such a nib, does it write just as springy and "flexy" (term loosely used) as it originally did, along with its new stub properties?
  6. I recently spent a few hours working on my good ole' ebonite Noodlers Konrad. I hadn't used this pen for quite a while and wanted to spice things up a bit. The changes I made (and highly recommend) are as follows: 1) the "easy my flex" mod, were you grind a portion off the sides of the nib as seen in the picture. 2) I doubled the depth/width of the feed channel, which managed to eliminate almost all railroading except on very aggressive downstrokes. and 3) I reground the tip to an XXXF needlepoint. I don't know how to measure the actual degree of fineness I achieved with this grind, but ill tell you it is so sharp that I may just use it to sew some new underpants. I don't by any means consider myself an experienced nib-alter-er-er, but it wasn't too difficult to shave the sides and smooth the tip with 8000, 12000 and 16000 grit polishing sandpaper. Anyways, here are some pictures of my work (and first attempt calligraphy); please comment if you have any questions, suggestions or have tried the same thing during your nib-related adventures. Enjoy.
  7. Geordielass

    Amateur Regrind On A Broken Nib?

    I like Parkers, mine are very reliable and well behaved, but I only have the cheapest ones as everyday carries. However, I've spotted a Parker Sonnet with a broken nib on ebay that I'm wondering about bidding on. One tine has snapped off just below the tipping but, other than that, the pen looks like new (perhaps someone bought it and broke it very quickly by trying to use it like a biro ). If I can get it cheaply, is it feasible, as a total novice (I've done the occasional bit of smoothing, but that's all) to snip off the end of the other tine and use abrasives to give the nib an untipped italic end that would last me a year or two? Or is this more complicated than I think? So far, the pen is up for 99p and has no bidders, with a day and a half to go, so if it still has no bidders by tomorrow morning, I'll probably see if I can get it cheaply. I could get a brand new Sonnet for very little more than I could get a new gold-plated nib for this one, so if regrinding this is something a ham-handed first-timer is likely to make a mess of, I'd be better passing it up. I suppose I could snip the tips off one or two of my ultra-cheap pens and try regrinding them first...? This could all be academic, if the pen gets a few bids in the next 24 hours, of course. I won't buy it if I have to pay more than about £10. More money than that would be better put towards getting a decent pen that works straight out of the box. For instance, when I priced new Sonnets and nibs I found a smart-looking stainless steel bodied Sonnet, brand new, for just over £40, so I don't see the point in spending more than about 25% of that on a broken one).





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