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  1. Hello dear FPNers, We have a common enemy. An enemy who is obsessive to take out what we have in our bank accounts or even what we got in our purses. A decisive, a talented, a perfectionist, a world wide known enemy who keeps releasing some magnificent items which we really don't need to but have to buy. Please welcome, Montblanc Le Petit Prince The Planet - Rose Burgundy: It is part of Le Petit Prince The Planet collection. It has the standard 50 ml cube-shaped bottle of Montblanc. It is freshly released. As far as I see, it is not claimed to be "limited edition", but it seems like. Don't know. The colour is a dusty burgundy red with hints of brown: I specifically did not filter this photo. Note that the photo is taken in a very bright time of day. The ink seems to be more vivid and more red than it really is. Actually, above version is what most people would expect to see when reading the name of the ink, I think. However, the colour seems to be more realistic in this tuned photo below: Yes, it is a bit brownish, maybe a litte bit greyish than what a burgundy red name recalls. This ink does not have an exact match of colour in ink literature as far as I know, but KWZ Brown-Pink is the closest one I suppose, which is a bit brighter, more vivid ink. Here are some writings with two lovely quotes from the book: Some close-up shots: Lovely shading, isn't it.. Note that, before moving on to ink properties, the pen I chose for this review is a Pelikan M605 in red: This pen normally comes with a 14k nib, but I found an 18k BB nib on Ebay and upgraded (!) it. Really, upgrade? It is a debate issue. Some likes 14k more since they are likely to be more springy. Of course it is also related to nib shape and the other contributors of alloy. Whatever, this nib is not a nail like my Aurora 88's 18k nib, but not amazingy soft either. It just has a small cushioning, that's all. I tuned its wetness and worked on the tip so that it is a wet stub now: Lovely. Saturation: Rose Burgundy has medium saturation. It is partially a washed out colour, but it cannot be said that it has low saturation I think. Sheen: Very little. Shows a distinct bronze sheen when you pour over huge amounts on Tomoe, but during normal writing, you will probably not see any sheen. Shading: Has a lovely shading. I loved it. Not the most shading ink, though.. But still above average. Shimmer: None. Wetness: Rose Burgundy is a dry ink, just like most Montblanc inks. I had specifically chosen a wet BB nib to compansate the potential dryness of this ink before I got the ink. But still, with very light pressure, this pen made some skippings on smooth Clairefontaine paper. Ink makes you really feel it is dry; not as dry as a Pelikan 4001, but still a dry ink. Feathering: Not detected, not likely to feather. In this term, quite a well behaved ink. The back page of Tomoe: Bleeding: Not detected, not likely to bleed. In this term, quite a well behaved ink. Showthrough: Some distinct showthrough on Tomoe but every ink has a showthrough on Tomoe, so it shouldn't be a criteria I think. So I tried it on 80 gr white Rhodia paper: And the back page is: An acceptable level of showthrough. If you zoom in at a sunny day outside, every ink will showthrough a little bit. So I can say this ink has a low amount of showthrough, like many other Montblanc inks. Water Resistance: I made a water test on Tomoe only: Let's see: Veeery little water resistance, nearly none. If you were about to find the equation of travelling in speed of light and if a cup of coffee spills over your papers, humanity would probably lost a few decades until some other person finds it. For me, it is nice. I love inks with low water resistance because they are cleaned easily. Similar Colours: As stated above, I think the closest ink in terms of colour is KWZ Brown-Pink. But there are some other powerful candidates: Diamine Tyrian PurpleMontblanc Antoine de Saint-Exupery, Encre du DesertJ. Herbin Poussiere de LuneSailor Studio 737I know it is not a very matching colour, but I wanted to compare it with Iroshizuku Edo-Murasaki also. Because Edo-Murasaki has the similar slightly washed out pastel characteristic of Rose Burgundy, except the former is a purple, not a burgundy brown. Another weak candidate is Noodler's American Aristocracy. It is not a very similar colour to Rose Burgundy, but I wanted to show the answer of question "What would happen if this ink was a bit browner?", so I added this one. Here are the swabs on Tomoe: And on Rhodia: I thought a rose of colour on Tomoe would help in exact comparison of Rose Burgundy with others. Again, I thought providing both the unfiltered and filtered versions would give some insight about the true colour. Unfiltered shot, slightly taken from side: Too bright, too warm, colours are more vivid than they used to be. Rose Burgundy is not this red normally. So here is filtered version: which suits better to reality I think. Another shot from a more perpendicular angle, which shows some sheen, again unfiltered first: And filtered version: Well, this last picture summarizes the results in terms of colour pretty well. Compared to Rose Burgundy: American Aristocracy is too brown, they seem like irrelevant. But with naked eye, American Aristocracy has some purple or burgundy red tones. If both inks are written with wet vintages, I think they will be likely to seem similar.Studio 737's base colour is much more pinkish, but it has high amount of green dye in it, making it a more complex, a darker colour with brilliant green sheen. Note that 737 is my favourite purple.Poussiere de Lune is closest in terms of being dustiness, but it is much more purpler and a bit greyish compared to Rose Burgundy. Besides, Poussiere de Lune gives green sheen whereas Rose Burgundy gives bronze sheen, which is of course valid when poured over Tomoe paper at high amounts for both inks.Edo-Murasaki is the most magenta ink out of all mentioned candidates. It does not have a vivid pinkish structure as much as 737 does, less greyish than Poussiere de Lune and it has definitely a more magenta undertone than Poussiere de Lune. It is pinker than what a medium purple should be. It has similar dusty characteristic evoking the Rose Burgundy.Saint-Exupery is the most red ink in this comparison. It is much redder than dusty Rose Burgundy, and definitely a more vivid colour.Tyrian Purple is a close colour to Rose Burgundy, but a bit pinker than it. It is a bit more "burgundy red" than Rose Burgundy, actually. Also, Tyrian Purple is more vivid, though being not a very saturated colour, it shows its colour better than Rose Burgundy.This part is a bit tricky. I said KWZ Brown-Pink is the closest colour I have in my inventory. Note that I am responsible of my own samples and pictures I provided you. I made a literature research on Brown-Pink's colour, and saw veeery different tones. Compared to those photos of KWZ on internet, Brown-Pink's colour provided by me is not that purplish, but rather a dusty pink with some chestnut hints. Actually, I think, base colour of Brown-Pink is lighter than Rose Burgundy, but Brown-Pink includes a considerable amount of green dye, making it a darker, a more vivid colour. CONCLUDING REMARKSThis is a dusty brownish burgundy red. A "unique colour" description would not be very wrong. This is a pale pastel colour with high shading.If you want saturated, vivid lines of colour, this ink doesn't seem to satisfy you.If you are on the train of sheen-craziness like me, this ink is not for you.There is no shimmer. It has a medium saturation I can tell. Doesn't deserve to be called "lowly saturated".It has nearly no water resistance. Didn't try yet but seems like it will be cleaned from pen very easily.It's kind of a dry ink. Try using it in wet nibs, even gushers or vintage pens, to get the maximum of it.Price is about 35 Euros, same as Montblanc Petrol Blue. It is definitely not a cheap ink, but not the most expensive one either. I am not sure if it deserves this price. I would buy it anyway since I am an ink nerd. There are cheaper alternatives in terms of colour, but not the exact same. Right now, I am suspicious that I will buy another bottle, because the colour seems to be a bit pale for my taste. But it is a unique colour, and it has the potential to be the ink of serious writings in moody days with a wet, unproblematic, reliable pen. If I start to enjoy the colour much more by putting it in my vintage Pelikan M400 with OBB nib, I may continue to buy this ink. Hope you enjoyed. Thank you..
  2. dannytang

    Nib Tuning/adjustment

    I recently acquired a 146 Bordeaux and that has a scratchy nib. I took a look at the nib with a 10x loupe and it appears the tines are not properly aligned. Does anyone know if Montblanc will tune the nib if I send it in for servicing? Or will they consider the nib damaged and require me to do a nib exchange? Note: I'll be sending it in for servicing anyways since it's scratched all over the pen, just worried they'll write-off the nib and make me get a new one. In which case, it would be better to send it off to get adjusted and ground down to a fine first.
  3. L'Artisan Pastellier Callifolio - Bordeaux L'Artisan Pastellier is a small company in southern France that specialises in natural pigments, and offers customers authentic and reliable products in beautiful colours based on mineral or vegetable pigments. In a collaboration with Loic Rainouard from Styloplume.net, the chemist Didier Boinnard from L’Artisan Pastellier created the line of Callifolio fountain pen inks. These pastel-coloured inks are traditionally crafted, and can be freely mixed and matched. Overall these inks are only moderately saturated, and have low water-resistance. The inks were specifically designed to work well with all types of paper, and all types of fountain pens. Being pastel-tinted, these inks have a watercolour-like appearance, and are not only fine inks for journaling, but are also really excellent inks for doodling & drawing. I only recently discovered them, and they are already the inks I gravitate towards for personal journaling. In this review the spotlight is in Bordeaux, one of the purples of the Callifolio collection. Bordeaux is presumably named after its namesake French wine - capturing the colour of this delicious produce of red grapes. The ink captures the wine's colour really well, but as an ink it is underwhelming. The ink has low saturation, and fails to give an "acte de présence" on the paper. Colourwise, I consider the ink to be too light a purple, leaning towards the pink side. I prefer my purples a lot darker. The ink also suffers from sub-par lubrication, giving it a scratchy feel while writing. Shading is present, but only in broader nibs (starting at M). With fine nibs the shading is almost absent, giving the ink a flat look on the paper. With broader nibs, I find the shading a bit too aggressive, with a tad too much contrast between light and darker parts. Overall, the looks of Bordeaux failed to wow me. To show you the impact of saturation on the ink's look & feel on paper, I made some scribbles where I fully saturated portions of the paper with ink. This gives you a good idea of what the ink is capable of in terms of colour range. Bordeaux shows an average dynamic range. The image shows that this is an ink with low saturation - even the heavily saturated part remains rather underwhelming. For me, this ink lacks personality, and did not impress me. On the smudge test - rubbing text with a moist Q-tip cotton swab - Bordeux behaved very well, with limited smearing and without impacting readability of the text, which remains crisp and clear. Water resistance is almost totally absent though. Both still and running water quickly obliterate all colour, leaving only a faint brownish ghost image on the page, which is barely decipherable. I've tested the ink on a wide variety of paper - from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. For the Callifolio reviews, I'm using small strips to show you the ink's appearance and behaviour on different paper types. On every band of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with an M-nib fountain pen The name of the paper used, written with a B-nib A small text sample, written with an M-nib Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib) Bordeaux behaved perfectly on all the paper types, with no apparent feathering even on the lower quality papers in my test set. Only with the infamous Moleskine paper, a tiny bit of feathering is present. Drying times are mostly around the 10 second mark, making it a fast drying ink. Not really suited for lefties though, because it lays down a rather wet line, albeit one that dries relatively fast. The ink looks at its best on pure white paper. On more yellowish paper, I quite dislike the colour. Overall, the ink fails to impress me... it looks too much like writing with wine, leaving low saturated wine stains on the paper. Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing. All samples were written with a Lamy Safari, which is typically a dry pen. I also added a wet visiting pen - a Pelikan M101N Lizard with M-nib. This pen shows a much more saturated line, but loses most of the shading. Related inks I have recently changed my format for presenting related inks to a nine-grid format, with the currently reviewed ink at the center. The new format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test - all in a very compact format. I hope that you'll find this way of presenting related inks more useful. It's a bit more work, but in my opinion worth the effort for the extra information you gain. Inkxperiment - cabin in the woods As a personal experiment, I try to produce interesting drawings using only the ink I'm reviewing. I find this to be a fun extension of the hobby, and think of these single-ink drawings as a nice challenge to stretch my drawing skills. Lately I have been experimenting with painting on photo paper. I find this to be a terrific medium for small drawings, making the ink look much more vibrant than on traditional watercolour paper. For this drawing I used HP Advanced photo paper. I started by outlining the horizon line and the cabin. Next I painted in the foreground and the treeline, using different mixtures of water and ink. Once dry, I painted in the tree details with pure Bordeaux, and added detail to the cabin using a fountain pen with M-nib. The birds in the sky are the finishing touch for this small 10x15cm drawing. The end result gives you a good idea of what can be obtained with Callifolio Bordeaux in a more artistic setting. Conclusion Bordeaux from L'Artisan Pastellier is a wine-coloured purple ink with low saturation. I find this to be a rather dull ink, without much character. Technically, the ink worked fine with all the papers in my test set, albeit with sub-par lubrication. Overall, not an ink I'm impressed with. I like the wine a lot better! Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Backside of writing samples on different paper types
  4. Stitchpunk

    Reasonable Price?

    *Waves hello* I would like to solicit some opinions from experienced collectors if that's ok. I'm in New Zealand, and on our local equivalent of eBay there is currently a MIB 146 bordeaux with the original paperwork, showing a purchase date of 1995. it looks unused and even still has the M nib sticker on it. The seller has a Buy Now of NZ$940 on it, which equates to around US$685. Would you consider that a reasonable price for this pen? A bargain? A bit steep? As you can see I have no idea! a VERY long time ago I used to sell all kinds of flash fountain pens for a living, but the only MB I ever got to own was the Hemingway ballpoint - and I sold that when I was a starving student trying to pay my rent :/ Now I'm starting to get back into fountain pens a little. Montblancs rarely come up for sale here, and if I bought one overseas I'd get hit with $NZ150 or more in import duties. I could buy this, but it'd empty my bank account. (Right now the most expensive fp I own is a Kaweco Liliput Fireblue.) I'd greatly appreciate any opinions/advice, thanks in advance!
  5. Mister Mont Blanc

    Montblanc Classique Clip Engraving

    Hi there everybody. I really hate to create a whole new topic just for this question but I am on an expedited quest to get a Montblanc pencil ASAP as school is starting in less than one week. I found a great deal on an old Bordeaux model but I noticed a faint engraving on the bottom of the clip that appears to say "frontier" maybe...? I thought I've seen this before so I'm wondering if it is a different brand's clip or some sort of personalized clip engraving someone had done...? The pencil is listed as "new in box." Thank you so very much for any help!!
  6. bardiir

    Montegrappa Bordeaux

    http://www.fp-ink.info/colorcard/370.png Nib creep and light fastness will come after a while as they take a while to measure. As long as they are unrated (0 stars) they are not measured yet.





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