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  1. Hi y'all! I have a Montblanc 310 that has quite a gap between the nib and the feed and am not sure of what to do, as I'm not sure whether the gap is the result of the nib being bent upwards or the feed being bent downwards. There's a video showing this pen's tear-down here: https://youtu.be/H57t0ZLfs1Y?t=42 but no the clear piece that joins the section to the barrel on mine just won't budge. Any ideas? I would like to take it apart, so I can either fix the nib properly or apply hot air or water to the feed to bend it upward to have it touch the nib's underside. The pen writes well, but has issues starting after not using it for a day because the ink that fills that gap evaporates. Thanks!!! alex
  2. Hi, I am a long time lurker on this forum but this is only my second post, so apologies in advance for starting off with this topic. Today, I received a newsletter from Iguanasell stating that they have Monbtlanc Chopin pen in stock. 'Wow, a NOS Hommage a Chopin pen', I thought. However when I opened the link, I saw that Montblanc has actually released a new Donation series pen in honour of Frederick Chopin. There is just one word to describe the pen: understated. It has a blue ink window, a piano hammer as the clip, his verses on the clip ring, signature on the cap and his face on the nib (weird in my opinion). I feel that the Donation series is underrated here and elsewhere on the internet (compare the number of Donation pen reviews as compared to the Writers pen reviews). I honestly adore the Donation series of Montblanc as they feature nice understated pens with some features to distinguish themselves from the common 146. This all used to be available (more on this later) at a relatively affordable price and definitely cheaper than the Writer's series (that series has honestly ventured into too much gaudiness at this point). Then I looked at the price.... 900 USD!! Before someone points out that 'It is a Montblanc, it IS supposed to be overpriced', let me list down the pens from the same brand which can be bought at this price: 1) A new Steel Solitaire 146 2) A used (or lightly used/ mint if you are lucky) Sterling Silver Solitaire 146 3) A new 75th Anniversary SE 146 4) 40 - 50% of the Writers Edition series (this also includes some of the non gaudy pens) 5) MANY special edition pens 6) Heck, most of the Donation series pens can be obtained new/ mint between 550 and 700 USD (if you know where to look) The saddest part about this for me personally is that I had started collecting the Donation series pens (and have bought the Karajan as my first pen at a slightly overpriced 700 USD, some others are cheaper) as I thought I could use the pens without raising too much eyebrows in the office (other than the folks who notice the snow star). But at this price range, I am really not sure. The series used to occupy a niche of being an understated series of beautiful pens with subtle things (the keyboard clip ring of Karajan, the red signature of Solti to name a few) to pay homage to the musician and show that it is something more than a common 146, all at a relatively lower cost. I realize that with the increase in price of the standard pens, the Donation series pens are supposed to be dearer too. But in this economic logic, has the series lost its niche as compared to other Montblanc pens? Other than fans of the musician who is being paid a homage, will anybody else buy this pen?
  3. Abstract:This article discusses the following issue:1. The Montblanc Meisterstück Classique 14X series products in burgundy color since 1980's2. The Montblanc Meisterstück 144 generations3. The origin and successor of Montblanc Meisterstück 144 The Montblanc Meisterstück 14X Burgundy Family:Allow me to start with 2 pictures shown below, from the left:1. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy2. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy3. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy4. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in black5. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy6. Montblanc 146 old style in black (just as a comparison)7. Montblanc 146 in burgundy (146R Bordeaux) Figure 1. The Montblanc Meisterstück 14X Burgundy FamilyFigure 2. The Montblanc Meisterstück 14X Burgundy Family Now, I will discuss the Montblanc Classique 144 generation:Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 characters:1. Monotone color 14k gold nib (figure 6) Please notice that the distance between the imprint and the shoulder of the nib is further compared to the 2nd (figure 14) and 3rd (figure 22) generation2. Ebonite feed (figure 7)3. Plastic section thresd equipped with old style Montblanc converter (figure 8)4. Cap clip reads 'GERMANY' (figure 5)5. Black section for both Black and Burgundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 3. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 4. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 5. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 6. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 7. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 8. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 9. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 10. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 characters:1. Monotone color 14k gold nib (figure 14) Please notice that the distance between the imprint and the shoulder of the nib is shorter compared to the 1st generation (figure 6)2. Old Style Plastic feed (figure 15) -> 2nd and 3rd generation use the same old style plastic feed3. Plastic section thresd equipped with old style Montblanc converter (figure 16)4. Cap clip reads 'GERMANY' (figure 13)5. Black section for both Black and Burgundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 11. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 12. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 13. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 14. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 15. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 16. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 17. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 18. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 characters:1. Monotone color 14k gold nib (figure 22) Please notice that the distance between the imprint and the shoulder of the nib is shorter compared to the 1st generation (figure 6)2. Old Style Plastic feed (figure 23) -> 2nd and 3rd generation use the same old style plastic feed3. Brass section thresd equipped with old style Montblanc converter (figure 24)4. Cap clip reads 'W-GERMANY' (figure 21)5. Black section for Black Montblanc Classique 144 and Bugundy section for Bugundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 19. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 20. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 21. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 22. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 23. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 24. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 25. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 26. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 characters (discontiuned around 2004):1. Bicolor 14k gold nib (figure 31)2. New Style Plastic feed (figure 32) -> Same with Montblanc 1453. Brass section thresd equipped with new style Montblanc converter (figure 33)4. Cap clip engraved with serial number (figure 30)5. Black section for Black Montblanc Classique 144 and Bugundy section for Bugundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 27. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 28. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 29. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 30. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 31. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 32. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 33. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 34. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 35. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 145 Chopin characters (started around 2004):1. Bicolor 14k gold nib (figure 40), nib size is significantly smaller than Montblanc 144 Classique Series2. New Style Plastic feed (figure 41) -> Same with Montblanc 144 4th generation3. Brass section thresd equipped with new style Montblanc converter (figure 42)4. Cap clip engraved with serial number and 'GERMANY' (figure 38&39)5. Black section for Black Montblanc Classique 144 and Bugundy section for Bugundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 36. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 37. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 38. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap)Figure 39. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap)Figure 40. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 41. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 42. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 43. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 44. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 146R Bordeaux characters:The 146R Bordeaux model is bascially the modern Montblanc 146 in Burgundy color.1. Bicolor 14k gold nib (figure 50)2. Plastic feed (figure 51)3. Cap clip engraved with serial number and 'GERMANY' (figure 47&48) Figure 45. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap on)Figure 46. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap)Figure 47. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap)Figure 48. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap)Figure 49. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap)Figure 50. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Nib Detail)Figure 51. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Feed Detail)Figure 52. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Nib Detail)Figure 53. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Section Detail)Figure 54. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap off) Montblanc 144G From the 50'sSince the beginning the of Montblanc's 3 digits fountain pen system, XX4 stands for the standard size (nib size). For example, size wise, 149>146>144>142, here 144 is the standard size.In 1948, 144 model was first introduced to the Meisterstück family, the predecessor is the 134 model. The 144 model has the following character:1. The pen is made from celluloid2. Breath Hole on Cap (figure 59)3. Blind Cap Imprint Indicates Pen Model and Nib Size (figure 60&61)4. Bi-color 14C nib (figure62) The imprint distance from the should is closer to the Montblanc Classique 1st Generation's desgin5. Ebonite feed (figure 63)6. Telescopic piston filler Figure 55. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Box)Figure 56. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Box Open)Figure 57. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Cap)Figure 58. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Cap)Figure 59. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Cap Breath Hole)Figure 60. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Blind Cap 'EF')Figure 61. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Blind Cap '144G')Figure 62. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Nib Detail)Figure 63. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Feed Detail)Figure 64. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Section Detail) Montblanc 234 1/2 From the 40'sIn 1934, the company changed its name to Montblanc-Simplo GmbH, the famous Montblanc 3 digits was adopted. For the first digit, 1 stands for Meisterstücks (Masterpiece), 2 stands for Middle Range and 3 stands for economy range.For the second digit, 0 stands for safety filler, 2 stands for button filler and 3 stands for piston filler.For the third digit, it stands for the nib size.Here, 234 1/2 stands for Middle Range, piston filler and 4 1/2 nib size pen. Since it was during wartime, gold was not allow for pen production and alloy was used for nib material.This 234 1/2 model has the following character:1. The pen is made from celluloid2. Breath Hole on Cap (figure 69)3. Cap Imprint 'MONTBLANC' (figure 68)4. Blind Cap Imprint Indicates Pen Model and Nib Size (figure 70&71)5. Alloy nib (figure 74) 6. Ebonite feed (figure 75)7. Telescopic piston filler (figure 72&73)8. Blind Cap can be taken off (figure 77) Figure 65. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Box)Figure 66. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Box Open)Figure 67. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap)Figure 68. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap Engraving)Figure 69. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap Clip)Figure 70. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Blind Cap 'EF')Figure 71. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Blind Cap '234 1/2')Figure 72. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Telescopic Piston Filler 'D.R.R')Figure 73. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Telescopic Piston Filler '652405')Figure 74. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Nib Detail)Figure 75. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Feed Detail)Figure 76. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Section Detail)Figure 77. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Blind Cap Off)Figure 78. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Blind Cap)Figure 79. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap On)Figure 80. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap Off) In the end, please enjoy the Montblanc Classique 144 Line with 145 Chopin:
  4. Preface: This article is to discuss the Montblanc 12/14/22/24/32/34 series, giving the reader detailed information on this series history background and structure. Also will discuss the pen's variations. I always enjoy this serie because these pens are very well made and the nibs are divine. There is not too much information for them available, I would like to make my contributions. And also if you are interested, I always have a couple of them available. Enjoy! Historical Background: First, I would like to quote from http://montblanc.parkerpens.org/montblanc.html. In 1959, the Montblanc line was redisigned, 142, 144 and 146 are retired, instead Montblanc was offering: Meisterstück: 12 (plastic, looked a bit like the Parker 45 and had a triangular capband) 14 (plastic, see above) 72 (with rolled gold cap) 74 (with rolled gold cap) 82 (with rolled gold cap and barrel) 84 (with rolled gold cap and barrel) 92 (in 14 carat solid gold cap and barrel) 94 (in 14 carat solid gold cap and barrel) Medium range: 22 (with 14 ct gold nib and two cap rings) 24 (with 14 ct gold nib and two cap rings) Economy: 32 (with 14 ct gold nib and one cap ring) 34 (with 14 ct gold nib and one cap ring) 31 (with steel nib) 32S (with steel nib, silver clip and cap ring) 34S (with steel nib, silver clip and cap ring) 31D (with "manifold" nib) 32P (cartridge filling system) 34P (cartridge filling system) As you can see, the 12/14/72/74/82/84 is Meisterstück range already, they are very well made, the plastic is very robust for Meisterstück range. The medium range (22/24) and economy range (31/32/34) is very well made, too. However, I did receive some reports saying that the 32's plastic developed cracks. I do have more than 10 economy range pens (32/34), they are all in NOS or near mint condition, no crack at all. I guess this really depends on the condition of the pen. The size: First I would like to show a picture of Montblanc 14/12/24/22/34/32 (from left to the right in Figure 1). The pens follow a 2 digit coding system, the second digit is most likely to be 2 or 4 --> 2 stands for regular size, 4 stands for large size. And for economy range, there are pens coded as 31, they are still regular size, the 1 just stands for regular size with steel nib (most of the economy range are equipped with 14k gold nibs). Figure 1. Montblanc 14/12/24/22/34/32 The 12/14 Series: It is very well summarized by "soapytwist" in a previous post (https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/132995-montblanc-12-22-and-32/), but there are some mistakes, I will just quote and make the correction. Please give the credit to him. The 12/14 series are equipped with: 1. 18k "butterfly" nib 2. Push on cap 3. Bishop's mitre cap band 4. Amber/brown, faceted ink window 5. Gold accent band on piston knob end Please check: Figure 2 to see the Montblanc 14/12 with cap off. Figure 3&4 to see the 18k "butterfly" nib on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 5&6 to see the feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 7&8 to see the assembled feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 9 to see the assembled section of a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 10 to see the Gold accent band on piston knob end of a Montblanc 12/14/72/74 Figure 11 to see the cap top of a Montblanc 12/14 Figure 12 to see the Bishop's mitre cap band of a Montblanc 12/14 Figure 13&14 see the cap of a Montblanc 72/74 Figure 2. Montblanc 14/12 with cap off Figure 3. 18k "butterfly" nib on a Montblanc 17/74/84/94 Figure 4. 18k "butterfly" nib on a Montblanc 17/74/84/94 Figure 5. Feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 6. Feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 7. Assembled feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 8. Assembled feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 9. Assembled section of a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 10. Gold accent band on piston knob end of a Montblanc 12/14/72/74 Figure 11. Cap top of a Montblanc 12/14 Figure 12. Bishop's mitre cap band of a Montblanc 12/14 Figure 13. Cap of a Montblanc 72/74 Figure 14. Cap of a Montblanc 72/74
  5. OldTravelingShoe

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  6. OldTravelingShoe

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  7. OldTravelingShoe

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  8. OldTravelingShoe

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  9. OldTravelingShoe

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  10. I’m not really Montblanc fan. I’ve never dreamed about owning MB 149 / 146 one day and most of their pens simply have no appeal to me. Not enough to consider spending crazy amount of money on them anyway. While some people may regard MB as grail pen, for me white star doesn’t hold a promise of special writing experience. Sure, I’m not deaf and when I hear and read about other people’s experiences with Montblanc I can’t help but become curious and eager to try them myself. Happily I try to participate in fountain pen aficionados meetings and I had a chance to see and try quite a few MB pens. Almost always after few minutes of toying with them I put them back and focus my attention on Viscontis and other pens. When we speak about pens from this price segment my design and materials preferences resonate better with St. Dupont or Caran d’Ache. As most of you know Montblanc 146 and 149 are classics well known and cherished by most fountain pen enthusiasts. Also they’re the pens often bought by successful managers and business mans and womans. Not all of them look for great writing instrument, some of them look for a status symbol. I work a recruiter and, sadly, I rarely meet fountain pen users. On the other hand some time ago I had a chance to meet marketing professional who, in the beginning of our interview, put a pen case on the desk, opened it and directed two white stars to me. I thought that she would use them to write at some moment of our conversation but that wasn’t the case. When she started to make notes, she used cheap, wooden pencil (still better than BIC rollerball in my opinion. I have a problem with people ready to pay 1000 $ for a suit, 500 $ for shoes, 3000 - 5000$ for a watch and then, they write with cheapest BIC pen. I feel some discrepancy here). The pens were supposed, I guess, to build professional image. And sadly this illustrates a problem I have with Montblanc. May people here enjoy and use their MB pens, but some just need a white star logo to prove something. I guess it’s not fair that I look at the brand through part of the target group but I just can’t help it. To make long story short – for long time I wasn’t interested in Montblanc. But then, suddenly, few months ago I felt some strange impulse. Imperative one at that. It made my neurons fire and move hand toward computer mouse and treacherous ebay. As we all know ebay is full of temptations, and when the impulse comes from the stars you have no choice but to click it. And so I have There’s not a lot of information about Montblanc Genertion. I don’t know when it was introduced on the market nor what was it’s target group nor the year when it was discontinued. It seems it was kind of entry level Montblanc but I’m not sure. I would appreciate any insight from more knowledgeable users. The pen is medium – sized and made of plastic. It definitely feels different and less precious compared to Meisterstuck pens. The Generation has clean lines and looks sleek. It can appear smaller than other fountain pens by the same maker. Cap and barrel are smooth and uncluttered, with nothing except simple gold cap bands. The pocket clip is slim and functional. The top of the cap has the black disc and trademark white star inside a gold band. The very top of the barrel has a thin gold ring, adding the final touch of trim. All in all it’s elegant design. The pen was made from plastic, threads from metal. The closing mechanism of the cap is quite well thought - three springy "tabs" seal the cap securely. In case of my pen only two of three tabs were really springy while the third one didn’t work. As a result the cap seated securely but not as tightly as I would like it to be. Happily it was corrected by Pen Doctor and now everything works fine. The pen is light and comfortable in the hand, and it shouldn’t tire the hand of those of us who write a lot. While I consider Pelikan M200/205/400/405 too small for me, Montblanc Generation that has similar dimensions feels much better in hand. Most often it comes in black or burgundy, but I saw also this model in green (you see it now too), yellow, orange, blue and gold. The pen was made from plastic, threads from metal. The closing mechanism of the cap is quite well thought - three springy "tabs" seal the cap securely. In case of my pen only two of three tabs were really springy while the third one didn’t work. As a result the cap seated securely but not as tightly as I would like it to be. Happily it was corrected by Pen Doctor and now everything works fine. Nib I won’t lie to you – this nib was the main reason I wanted to get this pen. I have a soft spot for inset / inlaid nibs. Every time I see one I check my account balance to see if I can allow myself some folly. Inset nibs look valiant and the ones I’ve tried so far were great writers. 14ct medium nib on this one is a great performer. The line it gives is wet and smooth, it doesn’t give a lot of feedback and is more on “buttery feeling” side of things. Additionally the line is rather broader than most European medium nibs and for me it’s an asset. Filling system Yawn. Cartridge / converter. There’s nothing wrong with it, actualli it’s quite comfortable, easy to clean and cheap in case you need to change converter. In the same time though it’s simply boring. Dimensions Closed: 139 mm Open: 128 mm Summary After some time of using the pen I have to admit that Montblanc Generation is a nice pen, definitely not cheap one but I don’t feel the money I’ve paid for it were wasted. It can be still found for around 90-200 $ depending on the color and condition. I’ve paid 135 euros for mine and that makes this pen one of more expensive ones in my possession. I wouldn’t say it’s worth this kind of money but if you can afford it or you collect Montblancs this one doesn’t disappoint. Also, it’s green and green is cool.
  11. OldTravelingShoe

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  13. rhodialover

    Montblanc Irish Green- A Review

    A Note About My Ink Reviews: All of the images in my reviews are scanned at 1200dpi on a Brother MFC-J6720DW in TIFF format, converted to A4 at 300DPI in Photoshop CC, and saved as a compressed JPEG. All scans were edited on a color calibrated ASUS PA248Q with aΔE<3 to ensure maximum color accuracy. TL;DR: The colors should be as accurate as is possible. Not having a suitable green (well, any green at all) in my ink collection, and not having any Montblanc ink to speak of, I decided to pull the trigger on a full bottle of Irish Green from Amazon. Rarely do I ever feel like buying a full bottle sight unseen (aside from such reviews as I can find on the internet), but in this case I liked the color enough and the price wasn't awful, so I bought it, along with Lavender Purple (also Montblanc) at the same time. I usually prefer blues to anything else, with my go-to being Diamine ASA blue, with the backup of Noodler's Midway Blue for the times I need something more water resistant. I have a single black, Noodler's X-Feather, and then Noodler's Apache Sunset, J.Herbin Stormy Grey, and Diamine Oxblood, and those have been my only inks for ~18 months, and I felt like I needed something new and more exciting. Enter Irish Green. So let me delve into the properties of this ink for a moment. Scores, where applicable, are represented on a 10-point scale, with 10 being better/larger than 1. Flow: When I tested this in my Edison 1.1 Stub, which is quite the wet pen, I found the flow to be wet, as expected, but not so wet that I found it difficult to use on lesser papers. What I did find, however, on lesser paper, is that the ink loses some of this flow and becomes a bit dryer when writing, and this is a noticeable difference, but should not be troublesome to most potential users. 7.5/10 Saturation: This ink is what I'd describe as a very saturated shader, but this could be due to the properties of the test pen. Stubs (at the very least the ones which I have had the pleasure of using) seem to have both a darker, more saturated output, but also seem to encourage shading. Lubrication: Better than most of the ink I own, but I have tried a sample of the Noodler's eel series and can say that it is similar. Very smooth, very much like glass, but not uncontrollable like some I've tried in a stub. Show-through: Virtually none on any of the Clairefontaine paper's I've tried, but quite a lot (as expected in a wet stub) on cheaper paper. Rhodia 90gsm as well as 80gsm Rhodia and CF Triomphe etc. handle it very well. Copy paper (which is what I did the review on) shows significant show-through, and the back of cheaper papers is simply not usable. Shading: It varies with the nibs used (also tried this ink in a Visconti Rembrandt M, and got almost no shading), but is usually enough to be noticed, but not enough to qualify it as one of those inks that is nothing but shading. Also varies with the paper used, CF and Rhodia papers which are less absorbent exhibit more shading. Bleed-through: None, even on cheap papers. Spread: None noticed on any of the tested papers. (Rhodia, CF, and #22 copy paper) Smear (dry): None on any of the tested papers. (Rhodia, CF, and #22 copy paper) Feathering: Extremely slight (not noticeable unless you look for it) on less-than-FP friendly paper, but none on higher quality papers. Water resistance: While it wasn't sold to me as water proof or resistant, and I fully expected it to wash off the page, I could not get it to rinse off. *Dry time for the water test was roughly 12 hours after it was applied to the paper, if immediate water resistance is your primary concern. (In which case I recommend X-Feather, from personal experience.) Other: The color is nice, but not so vibrant to be in your face and scream at you, but rather it is more of a muted plant green. It reminds me of foliage, to be honest, which isn't a bad thing, but it isn't light like Gruene Cactus Eel or dark like Diamine Sherwood green. It has quickly become one of my favorite inks for annotations and some general notes, but I don't think it fits for general writing, simply due to the fact that it is green. I have experienced no startup issues or nib creep. On another note, I really like the bottles, as they are both a significant design departure from Noodler's, Diamine, and J.Herbin bottles that I've owned. Overall, I am highly impressed by my first Montblanc ink, Irish Green.
  14. Here are 10 blue-black(ish) inks and two “true” blue inks as a comparison. Just for the fun of it. I scanned the sheet and with that most of the inks don’t show their sheen (or it’s not that obvious in the scan) so here are some photos of the inks to showoff some sheen: And for those of you who care about water resistance of inks, here are the inks after 15 seconds water bath:
  15. Hey everyone! I inked up a pen with one of my last cartridges of MB Toffee Brown to see if I wanted to purchase a full bottle of it before the price hike / packaging switch / potential reformulation or discontinuation. The answer turned out to be no, but then I had a pen full of ink to get rid of. What better way to do that than a review amirite? This one is not as entertaining as my previous review. Blame the ink. It's not an entertaining ink! I also stopped halfway through the review because I had the bright idea to search for a solution to the Wateman Kultur nib dryout problem, and lo and behold, FPN answered (with "glue"). So I dropped everything, glued up my pen, and came back to this review two days later, hence the page break, and perhaps the slightly darker ink after the page break. n.B.: Lamy Safari caps fit on Waterman Kultur pens, in case you need to seal an inked pen in a pinch. This is the water test:
  16. Hi All! I am a student who wrote with the same FP for many years. However, I wanted something new, so I decided to trade pens so that I could afford it and switch pens more often. I recently bought two Montblancs 144s. The price was good, but I have a few questions regarding the age, nib size and serial number. 1. How can I determen how old my pen is, even if there is no serial number. 2. I want to clean the pen a bit better, but I am not sure how to remove the nib. There is also not a good Youtube video that shows me that. Any ideas? 3. My pen has no serial number. I don't directly suspect the pen to be fake, but I am also not sure what the reason could be and if it's normal. Attached some pics for reference and age determination. Thank you all very much for your help in advance!
  17. After many years of thinking and trying Montblancs, I have finally decided to get one. I have selected 149 Platinum with medium nib. I normally prefer narrower nibs but occasionally use wider nibs (e.g. in my Sailor KOP). After I got home, I washed the pen following recommendations from Montblanc (using only distilled water, flush 5-6 times), then filled it in with Montblanc black ink and tried it out. I was very surprised that it was very-very wet and "messy". By messy, I mean that the flow seems to be a bit inconsistent letter to letter. It feels just as if there is a tiny hair stuck in the nib (I inspected the tines and there is nothing wrong). I used the pen to write around 10 letter-sized pages with not much improvement. It does not skip. The start seems fine but this MB is the wettest pen I have (even wetter than Pelikan M-1000) and surprisingly introduces feathering even on a good quality paper (tried a few brands of paper). I used it like this for a couple days and then decided to switch to a different montblanc inc (blue this time). I flushed the pen thoroughly with distilled water and inked it up. The blue ink behaves a tiny bit better but not too much. I can still see slight feathering. I am going to use it like this for a few days and then probably switch the nib to extra-fine. Alternatively I am considering sending the pen to Mike and have him grind to italic but with the new pen, I am more inclined to contact Montblanc and try their nib-switching service. Anyway, just wanted to share this. I am also attaching a sample of the writing (Montblanc on the top, then Pelikan M-100 with the same ink, followed by Sailor KOP and Sailor Realo). Other than the writing, MB 149 looks quite beautiful and feels very solid with good-looking nib.
  18. Ognjen_Ognjanovic

    NOS Montblanc

    I found this new old stock fountainpen at home with the original box. As far as I can tell, it was never used and it's in completely mint condition except for the box. Can anyone tell me is it worth anything?
  19. From the album: Odds and ends

    150 opened bottles of inks now have no place in my (wife's work-from-home) desk's main storage space, which is absolutely chockers, so most of these now live inside clear, stackable Daiso plastic storage boxes under the spare bed in the same room. Then there are also the 25 Diamine Inkvent Red Edition inks, although technically I can squeeze this into one of the desk's shallow drawers:

    © A Smug Dill

  20. I am freaking out a bit because my pen nib is stuck in the lid, and basically, what screws off is the hollow back of the pen, i.e. the plastic part you would screw off to replace a cartridge. Because I've never used a pen like this, and this was gifted to me by my father, I did something stupid. I went to the store and got new ink cartridges as I wanted to use the pen. The pen's nib was unscrewed from the cap, and the back part was unscrewed from the nib as you would normally do when changing a cartridge. After taking the old cartridge out, I put the new one in. I was trying not to make a mess, so I didn't press the new cartridge all the way in. I then went on screw the pen back tog, ether and the cartage pushed the nib into the lid, now wedged there. Does anyone have any idea of how I could fix this? What is the best way to go about this if I need it professionally repaired? Anything would help! Thank you in advanced for all your suggestions and help!
  21. Hello everyone! It has been a while since my last post but I wanted to share some quick photos of the Montblanc James Purdey & Sons Meisterstück Great Masters Rollerball Pen that I receive today. The photos are not great but I hope would still be of interest. In the past I have bought several Montblanc LE fountain pens but I have now realized that the Rollerball is a great option for me for everyday use. This special edition (not limited but I don't think they made many of these pieces) was released in 2019 yet I was able to found, as it is often the case for limited or special editions, the rollerball but not the fountain pen. So here is my question: are fountain pens LE more popular than the rollerball because of wider choice of ink, more fun in using them or .... Since the price difference between the roller (which obviously has no gold nib 😁) and the rollerball is not that substantial I was just intrigued to hear from other enthusiast why the fountain pen is often the first choice for these limited or special editions ? Are collectors/enthusiast only interested in the fountain pens and not the rollerball versions ? Sorry if it sounds too obvious but I just enjoy the writing experience of the rollerball (in this case mistery black LeGrand, I think there are only 2 colors for the LeGrand roller refills, right?) has been outstanding and very pleasant. Dare I say even better than many fountain pens I own Thanks for letting me know! Christian
  22. Hi, Is anyone please able to help me authenticate this briefcase or point me in the direction of someone who can please? I've attached some images but please let me know what else may be helpful to see. Thanks, Anthony.
  23. Fountainewbie

    Montblanc 146? Original? Year?

    Hello guys, I just bought a Montblanc pen (original i hope), used, for 200€. My pen has serial number and germany on top ring. On cap ring it has only “montblanc meisterstuck”: no pix neither n.° 146. I hope some of you guys can help me identify the year of this fountain pen (and if it is original). Thanks and happy new year!
  24. jebstuart

    Montblanc Noblesse Loose Cap

    Loose cap is a pretty common issue on Montblanc Noblesse, as for many other pens with a plastic snap inner cap. Plastic inner caps usually have a shorter life than the ones with metal mechanism, as they become loose over years of use by the friction of capping and uncapping. Fixing this issue can be not so easy. A fast search in the web gave back a range of proposed solutions: a single layer of electrical tape around the bottom of the inner cap, as it could pull back the inner cap in shape; a layer of Teflon tape on the clutch ring on the section (with an high risk of inner cap cracking); a little piece of cellophane tape inside the cap (with or without silicon grease to increase the adhesion); a thin layer of superglue or epoxy inside the bottom of the inner cap (a dangerous no-return method, in my opinion) in order to increase the grip coupling; a drop of boiling water into the cap, in order to soften and re-shaping the inner cap. Discarding the #4 because irreversible, and the #5 because too uncertain, I applied all the first three methods, but without success. So I planned to experiment a personal appoach, which brings together some of the theoretical assumptions of the methods #1 to #3. After unscrewing the topper with the MB star, I released the inner cap and clip (figure #1). Then I put a ring of a thermo-shrinkable tube (5 mm in height, 9.7 mm in diameter) around the bottom of the inner cap (figure #2). Using a lighter, I quickly heated the inner cap together with the thermo-shrinkable ring. The heat softened the inner cap plastic and at the same time shrank the ring (figure #3), reshaping the inner cap. Then I gently removed the shrunk ring (figure #4) and finally put the reshaped inner cap into the cap, screwing on the MB star cap top. The cap clicks nicely and firmly, now. Sincerely, I cannot predict how long the reshaping will last, but surely I will report the long term outcome of this matter.
  25. Rosetta59

    344, The Humble Montblanc

    In a previous review I managed to introduce a brief timeline of the 34x series. Now I wish to present to our community a revised, enlarged and corrected version. I hope it may be useful. Many pictures are borrowed from the websites penboard.de and hepworthdixon.com. Tom Westerich (penboard) and Michael Knott (hepworthdixon) kindly permitted me to employ their marvelous images. MB 344, the humble Montblanc The Montblanc 34x series was introduced on the market at the beginning of the fifties; the starting year being 1951 or 1952, even if some pre-series are presumably from 1950. The first type (34x) was produced until 1953; the second (3-4x), after some restyling, from 1953 up to 1957, and the third (34x), from 1957 up to 1960, when the production was halted. The 34x series was intended as a third tier (i.e. third price range) following the flagship 14x and the middle priced 24x / 25x / 26x. 344 / 342 stand for: 3 (third tier); 4 (piston filling system); and 4 / 2 (the nib size) Tech Specifications Technically speaking these fountain pens are of ordinary level, as expected from an “jeden erschwinglich” economy range (so to speak… the original price of a 344 model in 1952-53 was 20 DM, with a contemporary exchange rate of 11.70 DM for a UK pound, this translates in 34 shillings and two pence, when a Conway Stewart 58 – the top of the line during those years – was priced 31 shillings and six pence). Models 34x do not show smart technical innovations, but the quality is nevertheless high. The clip is retained by a domed stud, with a white Montblanc signet inlaid to the top. The clip is a ring-type, screw mounted, it has a frozen drop shape. The cap itself screws on the body of the pen. The models 342 and 3-42 are 125 mm long when closed, their diameter is 13 mm and the weight is 15.8 gr. The models 344 and 3-44 are 134 mm long when closed, their diameter is 13.5 mm and the weight is 17.5 gr. Variations do exist among the series. Montblanc brochure with available models - 1955 (?) Materials The very initial production run consisted of celluloid models with an amber ink window. Thereafter the 34x were produced in molded injection plastic with a pale blue ink window. The cap ring (only one) was gold filled as well as the clip. The nib was gold 14 ct. (models 34xG and 3-4xG). Until 1957, the 34x and 3-4x models were equipped also with steel nibs. The feed was made in ebonite. Filling System On these fountain pens we found a classic piston filling system, already employed by Montblanc in its whole production at the time. The first series have a cork sealed, prewar-like piston with a shorter knob, while the later series have a plastic seal piston. Versions The 34x fountain pens were made in two sizes, related to the nib class: the smaller 342 (with a size 2 nib) and the medium 344 (with a size 4 nib). The letter “G” was added to the model number of the pens (Goldfeder) when a gold nib was employed; no letter when the nib was stainless steel (at least until 1957, when the 344 -w/o added letters- had a gold nib). The first 34x series had the single gold band near the cap’s lip. On the cap there was the iconic prewar engraving MONT- ^^BLANC. The ink window on the first celluloid models was amber; the following models were plastic with a pale blue window. The section is concave in the former version. The piston knob has a shorter size than the newer versions. It is engraved with the model #, the “G”, when appropriate, and the tip size . The feed in ebonite is flat (“ski slope”) with long grooves and the domed stud on the cap is engraved with the outline of the Montblanc star, like the old 33x series. The final 34x version (1957 up to 1960) is made in injection molded plastic. The cap ring was substituted with a gold band which covered the cap’s lip and was engraved with “MONTBLANC” and “ * 344 * ” or “ * 342 * ”. The iconic prewar engraving on the cap was withdrawn (even if there are very scarce transitional samples with both engravings). The ink window remained pale blue and the section was straight. On the domed stud a solid white Montblanc star appeared as on the 14x series. The piston knob was a long one, with the nib size engraved. The feed is now rounded with full length grooves. The nib was always in gold 14 ct. on the 344. Some 342 “G” do exist in this last version. So, probably, some 342 with steel nib were available in the last production run. Production Timeline (proposed scheme – a similar one may apply to the 342 / 3-42) Production dates are proposed on the basis of MB catalogues, brochures and the book “Collectible Stars”(cit. page 13) 344G(1). First production run, 1950 (?) Models 344G and 344. The star on the top is outlined white. On the cap there is engraved: MONT-^^BLANC. The cap ring, unengraved, leaves a free lip. The piston knob is short (with 344G or 344 and the tip size engraved), the ink window is amber and the body is made in celluloid. The feed is made in ebonite, with a “ski-slope” shape. The section is a smooth center-concave shaped cylinder. 344G(2). Second series, 1951 - 1953 (?) Models 344G and 344. Same as above, but the body is made in injection molded plastic. The ink window is pale blue. There are both long and short ink window versions. 3-44G(1). Third series, 1953 – 1954 (?) Models 3-44G and 3-44. (Note that there is the dash) The star on the top is outlined white. On the cap there is engraved: MONT-^^BLANC. The cap ring, unengraved, leaves a free lip. The piston knob is short (with 3-44G or 3-44 and the tip size engraved), the long ink window is pale blue and the body is made in injection molded plastic. The feed is made in ebonite, with a “ski-slope” shape. The section is the usual concave. 3-44G(2). Fourth series, 1954 – 1956 (?) Models 3-44G and 3-44. (Note that there is the dash) The star on the top is outlined white. On the cap there is engraved: MONT-^^BLANC. The cap band, unengraved, covers the lip. The piston knob is short (with 3-44G or 3-44 and the tip size engraved), the long (or short) ink window is pale blue and the body is made in injection molded plastic. The feed is made in ebonite, with a “ski-slope” shape. The section is the usual concave. 3-44G(3). Fifth series, 1956 – 1957 (?) Models 3-44G and 3-44. (Note that there is the dash) The star on the top is solid white and smaller than the outlined. On the cap there is engraved: MONT-^^BLANC. The cap band, unengraved, covers the lip. The piston knob is long (with 3-44G or 3-44 and the tip size engraved), the short ink window is pale blue and the body is made in injection molded plastic. The feed is made in ebonite, with a “ski-slope” shape. The section can be either the usual concave one or the newer straight truncated cone, smooth. 344(3). Sixth series (and last), 1957 – 1960 Model 344 (all with gold nib 14 ct.) The star on the top is solid white and smaller than the outlined. The cap is unengraved. The cap band, engraved with “MONTBLANC *344*”, covers the lip. The piston knob is long (with the tip size engraved), the short ink window is pale blue and the body is made in injection molded plastic. The feed is made in ebonite, with a “rounded” shape and two long grooves. The section is a straight truncated cone, smooth. Page from a Montblanc Catalogue, 1957 Colours These pens were initially produced only in glossy black. Then plastic models followed where the color was petrol blue, mahogany red, olive green, and pearl grey, with a clear ink window or no window at all. Some red models are described as “burgundy”. Generally speaking the fancy models were probably intended for export. At least one model was manufactured in Spain (see the last image before the "MB star"). Nibs These pens were produced with two nib sizes: #2 and #4, such as the final number of the model (either 342 and 344). There were two types: a gold plated steel nib (342 and 344 of the first series) and a solid 14 ct. gold (342 G / 344 G on the former series and 342 / 344 on the latter). #2 nib is 23 mm long, while #4 nib is 28 mm long. Tip size ranged from EF to BB (oblique types were available). On the nib there was engraved (in six lines): “MONT”, “BLANC”, “14C”, “MONTBLANC”, “585”, and “342” or “344” (hidden under the section). Timeline adapted from www.fountainpen.it Model 344(3) 1957 – 1960 (penboard.de) On the web a great deal of information is available : more than half a million sites are the result of a simple search with keywords “Montblanc 344” or “Montblanc 3-44”; more than 1500 images are available on the net in the same search. Summary Table – 344 / 3-44 Versions Anyway, “mixed” or “franken” models do exist with caps, knobs or feeds added in a further period. In this table and in the whole article, only those models with multiple entries in different websites, such as penboard, hepworth-dixon, eBay, and other dotcoms, were considered. This in order to possibly avoid a frankenpen to be identified as an additional version. A page from a vintage Montblanc catalogue, probably ‘54, since there are both the 24x models and the 042 with steel nib (1954 was the last production year of the 24x series and the start of the 042). Here the 344 represented is a 3-44[G](2). Nat – (Italy) Dec 2015 Images 344G(1) Made in celluloid with the amber window. This appears to be the original first production run. penboard.de 344G(2) (Long Window) the body is plastic with the blue window. 3-44G(1) (Long Window) the cap ring is not at lip.On the knob the model number is already with a dash. penboard.de 3-44G(2) The star is still outlined but the cap band covers the lip. hepworthdixon.com ​ ​ The two feeds we find on the different 344 and 3-44 models: the old type (ski-slope) is on the left. The former type was in use by Montblanc from 1950-52 to 1955, while the newer type was emplo-yed from 1955 onwards (as in the article by Barry Gabay on PenWorld: Dating Montblanc 149s). The pen on the left has the former concave smooth section, while the newer has the straight one. (hepworthdixon.com) 3-44[G](3) (Short Window) the cap band is unengraved and the star is solid white. “G” is not engraved on the knob because this pen had probably a native steel nib. penboard.de Final Model 344(3) (Short Window) the engraving is now on the cap band. White solid star. Model 344G(1) España (note the stud) _________________________________________________________________________________________ The Montblanc Star*: This is the cap of a Montblanc 344(3), the latest model 1957-1960 - (personal author’s collection). *Actually it is not a star, but a graphic representation of the six glaciers on top of the Mont Blanc. The price of a 344, from 1950 to the production end, in 1960, was 20 DM. Practically speaking, it was about 1/7th of the price of the Troy Ounce of Gold. Considering the price of the gold ounce now (December 2015, one gold ounce = 984 € or 1075 $), we have 141 € or 154 $. In the book “Collectible Stars” by J.Rosler & S.Wallrafen (O.W. Gmbh, Oberhausen 2001), the rarity of the 344 models is set at the 2nd ranking (i.e. easy to find) and the price is set at 02 (from 50 to 150 euros – 2001). The average price of a vintage 344 on eBay in November 2015 is 155 US $ (from 72 to 311 US $). The average price of a vintage 344 on eBay in December 2015 is 188 US $ (from 101 to 483 US $). The price requested on eBay for vintage 344s for sale today, 20th Dec 2015, ranges from 225 to 369 US $ (dependent on the conditions of the pen). In the book “Collectible Stars”, already cited, we find (page 31) only three types of 344s: first (id 1095), produced 1951-53 has the star outlined and cap ring above the lip; second (id 1098), produced 1954-56 has the solid white star and an unengraved cap ring above the lip; third (id 1100), produced 1957-60, has the solid white star and the engraved cap band covers the lip. 1095 ………… is identifiable with either the present 344G(1) or 344G(2) 1098 ………… I have never seen pictures of this 344 subtype 1100 ………… is identifiable with the present 344(3) Notably, the 3-44 (note the dash) models are not quoted in the book _________________________________________________ MB MAINTENANCE BOOKLET 1956: pages 12,13 (here the pen is a 3-44[G](2)) From the site www.caprafico.com “PREVIOUS MODELS” (i.e. those older than 1956) pages 48,49 (here the pen is a 344G(1 or 2)) Note: -The new piston with the long knob (page 13) -The old piston with a shorter knob (page 49) -A mistake in the “exploded” view of the piston, a short (instead of a longer) cone is shown (page 13) -The cap band covers the lip (page 12) -The new barrel (page 12) -The cap ring leaves the lip free (page 48) -The old barrel (page 48) Hope this may be of help.





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