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  1. Being a bit of a Montblanc fan, wanting to add a blue or blue/grey variant, and wanting to add more to the MB herd, I found a few potential candidates. Glacier La Petit Prince Skywalker Cool Blue Guilloche Starwalker Space Blue I have other LeGrand/146 pens and have never owned or experienced any of the Skywalkers. I believe one of the 146 sized pens has a fine nib, others are medium and a broad 146. I have fines, mediums and broads from MB already also. Getting the Glacier or Prince would be more or less for aesthetic purposes over having a new writing experience. Getting one of the Skywalkers would give me a different writing experience to add to the other 9 MB pens I have. In the end, I like how all of my Montblanc pens write and enjoy having a variety depending on my mood or whim. What I would ultimately like, however, would be to get BBB nibs and have a nibmeister grind them to my specifications. But finding BBB nibs are rare. In the meantime I can enjoy having a set of fun pens. Of the four, the most eye catching, to me, is the Cool Blue Guilloche. That said, I also like the blue/grey color of the others. Each one have an appeal. I do not want all four. I'd rather pick one and move on to a completely new version to bring into the family. Possibly a Patron of Art sometime down the road? Who knows? Montblanc has a vast catalogue to choose from. Plus I'm still awaiting the 100th Anniversary of the Meisterstuck to be announced. Exclusion of price, which of the four would you choose?
  2. NewMBcollector

    New guy looking for some help please

    Dear MB network I am a new member on the FPN and am about to make one of those posts/requests that no seasoned collector or expert wants to read let alone entertain but I have very few options from my current country of residence. I have been collecting MB pens for a few years now and although I am completely in love with them I am at a point in life where I need to let go of the majority of my collection. I know very little of how to value these wonderful items and I always bought what I loved rather than what was hype or hip at the time. The issue I am having is finding reliable sources for pricing information so I do not get shafted by valuations here and there. In my other collecting fields such as Comics or Nihonto there are documented, certified, price guides and tutorials that help but when trying to gauge the market on pens...minefield. I know that as with everything condition is paramount and if pens are still sealed even better, but how to realistically gauge the valuation, no clue. So, I am sorry to ask for the obvious, but can anyone help guide me here? I am attaching the pictures as they are. The pens in these pictures have never been used and all have their box and papers with them. The ones I have used I am keeping with me here goes:
  3. Hi all- Sorry if this has been discussed before but I could not find a good answer. I am helping my 80 year old father with many things but the latest issue is taking his MontBlanc collection out of a ziploc bag (yes, they are stored together in one big bag with no protection between them) and finding a suitable storage solution. I think he would prefer a leather case but would also consider something, such as a box, to be on his desk at home. Nothing cheap from Amazon or AliExpress but nothing over a few hundred dollars either. The issue is I cannot find anything that will actually fit the LeGrand and/or 146/149 pens. Here is his collection: Classique pencil Classique ballpoint x2 Classique rollerball (metal, not silver cap) Le Grand rollerball LeGrand highlighter 146 (or maybe a 149) fountain pen x2 They are all classic black/gold (except for the metal cap one) Thank you for any help, information, or links to product pages.
  4. PRELUDE In the search of suitable replacements for a Meisterstuck Doue FP 145 My meticulously planned fountain pen hiatuses are occasionally disrupted by the well-meaning members of my family. Instead of appreciating my carefully timed fountain pen acquisitions, they enthusiastically offer advice on investments, the time value of money, and everything in between. To add a twist to the tale, they threw me a curveball last year by gifting a Meisterstück Doue FP 145 LE, even though I had only bought a total of three fountain pens in the last three years. If we exclude the Opus 88, then it's just two. The Doue 145 is undeniably a beautiful pen, but I found myself wondering if I could ever use it with its slim metal section and rather shortish nib. Determined to find a more suitable replacement, I revisited the local MB Boutique. While Montblanc's customer service remains top-notch for pens within the two-year warranty period, they seem to derive more delight from pens outside the warranty period than their customers do. Faced with the task of choosing two pens to match the value of the pricier Doue, I was drawn to a Naruto LeGrand 146. Then, the salesperson revealed his secret NOS drawer, housing various pens, including a Great Characters Walt Disney FP. Opting for the Montblanc M, not only because its 2018 price, combined with the Naruto, matched the total credit value for the Doue, but also because it simply looked nicer. And here goes the review.... If you like a pictorial blogger view, here is the link: A Review of the Montblanc M in Red PRESENTATION (6/6) Usual MB The usual MB single pen box. The standard Montblanc single pen box with no customisation, with the only variation being the red cardboard sleeve that encases the box. The RED collection boasts a charitable initiative, contributing less than 1% (€5) towards fighting HIV/AIDS programs. It's almost as if Montblanc is tackling HIV/AIDS single-handedly, making minuscule donations of €5 at a time, all while charging the end customer a whopping €540+. As Master Yoda famously said, “Do or do not. There is no try”. The pen securely nestles within a cushioned and somewhat snug slot inside the box, accompanied by a complimentary cartridge filled with black ink. However, it seems that most of the ink inside the cartridge had evaporated during its 5 years of shelf-living. DESIGN (6/6) From the likes of the Apple Watch The Montblanc M, available today in three finishes—Ultra Black, RED, and RED Signature—has been designed by Marc Newson, renowned for his work on the Apple Watch. Newson has successfully blended functionality with elegance, anchoring the design firmly outside the tradition for Montblanc. The shape of the pen is particularly appealing in modern pen terms. It boasts a perfect cylindrical shape with zero taper and rounded ends, except for the flat section, commonly referred to as the “plateau” at the end of the barrel. The platinized clip is a personal favourite; it avoids the cheap look of the Safari, perhaps because it's not oversized and doesn't unlawfully occupy a third of the cap's surface area. The glossy and bright red finish mirrors background lights and hues effectively. Upon uncapping, one notable feature is the novel use of magnets to secure the cap. The snap cap rotates itself to align its magnetic poles perfectly, ensuring the clip and plateau on the barrel are perfectly aligned on a plane. A soft snap securely seals the cap, earning full marks here. According to Red Dot Project award records, the snowflake emblem made of white resin is ultrasonically welded onto the plateau and then milled with a diamond tool to maintain flatness. The design reflects a harmonious flow and is truly eye-catching. The cap, adorned with the snowflake emblem on top like regular Montblanc pens, exhibits impeccable overall quality of work. In certain lighting conditions, the magnetic insert is faintly visible inside the cap. The knurled platinized metal section adds enough weight to balance an otherwise light barrel. Due to the flat plateau on the barrel, the cap cannot be posted. The section, embossed with the MONTBLANC brand name five times on the visible rear ring where the cap snaps on, is somewhat short and not ideal for longer writing sessions. More on that later. FILLING & CLEANING SYSTEMS (4/6) Cartridge & No Converter This is where, like many other fountain pen users, I express my concerns. It's worth noting that this pen only supports standard international short cartridges, and none of the available converters are compatible due to the featured plateau on the barrel. On the positive side, the pen accepts short international cartridges or proprietary MB cartridges, limiting its cartridge capacity to 0.5 ml. The form of the pen, while aesthetically pleasing, somewhat restricts its functionality as part of the design. Perhaps because the pen was conceived in this digital age, the designer didn't anticipate it being used extensively. Additionally, cleaning the section with running tap water is an easy process. NIB - ALL THAT MATTERS (6/6) The two toned rhodium ruthenium stunner The 14k nib is claimed to be handcrafted by Montblanc in a series of 30 steps. Rhodium-coated with a dark grey ruthenium-coated inlay, this nib is a stunner. I particularly love the shape of the nib, which comes in two widths - Fine and Medium, as far as I know. A dazzling cylindrical flow of silvery rhodium bounds the dark grey ruthenium inlay with well-defined contours. Just below the circular breather hole, the 'M' logo rests within an encircled star. The tail end specifies the composition 'Au585' of the gold-alloy, and the brand name 'MONTBLANC' rests just above the tail. Between those, a hallmark of 'StOD' inside a crossed ellipse adds a touch of elegance. As always, the nib itself doesn't mention the width explicitly, but a sticker at the piston end of the barrel provides all the necessary details. Once you turn the nib, you'll behold a somewhat unconventionally shaped black glossy feed that seamlessly matches the curvature of the pen. Apart from an air hole, there is nothing else in the feed, although the nib runs almost medium wet. PHYSICS OF IT (5/6) – RELATIVELY SPEAKING The Newtonian Laws The overall capped length is around 14 cm. As perhaps mandated by Mr. Newson, I have to use the pen un-posted. Although the section has a somewhat comfortable girth, the shortest length of the section of around 2 cm with a step from the barrel does make it less than ideal to use it as a workhorse. The metallic section balances the weight of 19g pretty well. Below are the pictures along with a Conid Minimalistica for a comparative reference. The Minimalistica is super comfortable for me, here are the dimensions for the Montblanc M. Uncapped Length ~ 12.5 cm Total Length ~ 14 cm Exposed Nib Leverage ~ 1.6 cm (A #6 nib has typically 2.4 cm) The weight of the pen is comforting even without the cap. Overall Max Weight ~ 27 g (with a cartridge, without cap ~18.75 g) ECONOMIC VALUE (0/0) FOC for me No comments. No rating, as I paid nothing WRITING & FINAL COMMENTS (5.4/6) Writes well The writing experience is quite pleasant, albeit with a relatively stiff nib. It does possess a hint of tooth and precisely the kind of control you'd expect from a well-tuned nib. There is a certain degree of softness in the nib, though minimal line variation occurs with pressure. Lines dry in 30 seconds with MB Toffee brown ink on Endless Regalia 80 GSM paper, and the line width is sufficient to display some shading. The nib skipped on the black cartridges (the salesman included a couple of cartridge packs), but it performs flawlessly on the brown ones, offering a steady ink flow with no drying issues. However, the length of the section, along with the step, leaves something to be desired in an otherwise excellently designed fountain pen. The nib leverage is minimal, so you inevitably touch the step from the barrel. With sweat, the knurling on the grip loses efficiency, unlike a Conid Kingsize with a titanium section. The weight, balance, and aesthetics of the Montblanc M surpass present standards. I believe Montblanc has successfully created a modern pen. Thank you for going through the review. You can find other pen and paraphernalia reviews here. REFERENCES Mark Newson - M Red Red Dot Project PS. I am posting a fountain pen review after 4 long years and my 2 year old keeps me totally occupied.
  5. zelenogradskiy

    I.D. on this pen?

    Got this antique Montblanc pen as a gift a few days ago, was wondering exactly which model or series it is. The nib says Iridium point Germany on it, it was bought in an antique store in Istanbul. Thank you in advance, if any extra info is needed I can provide!
  6. Hello y'all, I've gone and done it. I cracked the section on my 221P. It's cracked in multiple places and unless I try to fix it with super glue and the entire grit of micro mesh, it seems unrepairable. The plastic seems somewhat brittle. Now I'm looking for parts. I looked on eBay to no avail. Does anyone know where I can find a section for the 221P? Any help will be appreciated. Happy New Year, Ross
  7. I’ve noticed some oxidation on the cap & section of the ruthenium coating, also noticed this on the piston end section, not sure if this is brassing or oxidation. It looks cool tho & I haven’t polished it off as I’m concerned that the ruthenium coating would rub off. Any thoughts?
  8. I’m not really Montblanc fan. I’ve never dreamed about owning MB 149 / 146 one day and most of their pens simply have no appeal to me. Not enough to consider spending crazy amount of money on them anyway. While some people may regard MB as grail pen, for me white star doesn’t hold a promise of special writing experience. Sure, I’m not deaf and when I hear and read about other people’s experiences with Montblanc I can’t help but become curious and eager to try them myself. Happily I try to participate in fountain pen aficionados meetings and I had a chance to see and try quite a few MB pens. Almost always after few minutes of toying with them I put them back and focus my attention on Viscontis and other pens. When we speak about pens from this price segment my design and materials preferences resonate better with St. Dupont or Caran d’Ache. As most of you know Montblanc 146 and 149 are classics well known and cherished by most fountain pen enthusiasts. Also they’re the pens often bought by successful managers and business mans and womans. Not all of them look for great writing instrument, some of them look for a status symbol. I work a recruiter and, sadly, I rarely meet fountain pen users. On the other hand some time ago I had a chance to meet marketing professional who, in the beginning of our interview, put a pen case on the desk, opened it and directed two white stars to me. I thought that she would use them to write at some moment of our conversation but that wasn’t the case. When she started to make notes, she used cheap, wooden pencil (still better than BIC rollerball in my opinion. I have a problem with people ready to pay 1000 $ for a suit, 500 $ for shoes, 3000 - 5000$ for a watch and then, they write with cheapest BIC pen. I feel some discrepancy here). The pens were supposed, I guess, to build professional image. And sadly this illustrates a problem I have with Montblanc. May people here enjoy and use their MB pens, but some just need a white star logo to prove something. I guess it’s not fair that I look at the brand through part of the target group but I just can’t help it. To make long story short – for long time I wasn’t interested in Montblanc. But then, suddenly, few months ago I felt some strange impulse. Imperative one at that. It made my neurons fire and move hand toward computer mouse and treacherous ebay. As we all know ebay is full of temptations, and when the impulse comes from the stars you have no choice but to click it. And so I have There’s not a lot of information about Montblanc Genertion. I don’t know when it was introduced on the market nor what was it’s target group nor the year when it was discontinued. It seems it was kind of entry level Montblanc but I’m not sure. I would appreciate any insight from more knowledgeable users. The pen is medium – sized and made of plastic. It definitely feels different and less precious compared to Meisterstuck pens. The Generation has clean lines and looks sleek. It can appear smaller than other fountain pens by the same maker. Cap and barrel are smooth and uncluttered, with nothing except simple gold cap bands. The pocket clip is slim and functional. The top of the cap has the black disc and trademark white star inside a gold band. The very top of the barrel has a thin gold ring, adding the final touch of trim. All in all it’s elegant design. The pen was made from plastic, threads from metal. The closing mechanism of the cap is quite well thought - three springy "tabs" seal the cap securely. In case of my pen only two of three tabs were really springy while the third one didn’t work. As a result the cap seated securely but not as tightly as I would like it to be. Happily it was corrected by Pen Doctor and now everything works fine. The pen is light and comfortable in the hand, and it shouldn’t tire the hand of those of us who write a lot. While I consider Pelikan M200/205/400/405 too small for me, Montblanc Generation that has similar dimensions feels much better in hand. Most often it comes in black or burgundy, but I saw also this model in green (you see it now too), yellow, orange, blue and gold. The pen was made from plastic, threads from metal. The closing mechanism of the cap is quite well thought - three springy "tabs" seal the cap securely. In case of my pen only two of three tabs were really springy while the third one didn’t work. As a result the cap seated securely but not as tightly as I would like it to be. Happily it was corrected by Pen Doctor and now everything works fine. Nib I won’t lie to you – this nib was the main reason I wanted to get this pen. I have a soft spot for inset / inlaid nibs. Every time I see one I check my account balance to see if I can allow myself some folly. Inset nibs look valiant and the ones I’ve tried so far were great writers. 14ct medium nib on this one is a great performer. The line it gives is wet and smooth, it doesn’t give a lot of feedback and is more on “buttery feeling” side of things. Additionally the line is rather broader than most European medium nibs and for me it’s an asset. Filling system Yawn. Cartridge / converter. There’s nothing wrong with it, actualli it’s quite comfortable, easy to clean and cheap in case you need to change converter. In the same time though it’s simply boring. Dimensions Closed: 139 mm Open: 128 mm Summary After some time of using the pen I have to admit that Montblanc Generation is a nice pen, definitely not cheap one but I don’t feel the money I’ve paid for it were wasted. It can be still found for around 90-200 $ depending on the color and condition. I’ve paid 135 euros for mine and that makes this pen one of more expensive ones in my possession. I wouldn’t say it’s worth this kind of money but if you can afford it or you collect Montblancs this one doesn’t disappoint. Also, it’s green and green is cool.
  9. Preface: This article is to discuss the Montblanc 12/14/22/24/32/34 series, giving the reader detailed information on this series history background and structure. Also will discuss the pen's variations. I always enjoy this serie because these pens are very well made and the nibs are divine. There is not too much information for them available, I would like to make my contributions. And also if you are interested, I always have a couple of them available. Enjoy! Historical Background: First, I would like to quote from http://montblanc.parkerpens.org/montblanc.html. In 1959, the Montblanc line was redisigned, 142, 144 and 146 are retired, instead Montblanc was offering: Meisterstück: 12 (plastic, looked a bit like the Parker 45 and had a triangular capband) 14 (plastic, see above) 72 (with rolled gold cap) 74 (with rolled gold cap) 82 (with rolled gold cap and barrel) 84 (with rolled gold cap and barrel) 92 (in 14 carat solid gold cap and barrel) 94 (in 14 carat solid gold cap and barrel) Medium range: 22 (with 14 ct gold nib and two cap rings) 24 (with 14 ct gold nib and two cap rings) Economy: 32 (with 14 ct gold nib and one cap ring) 34 (with 14 ct gold nib and one cap ring) 31 (with steel nib) 32S (with steel nib, silver clip and cap ring) 34S (with steel nib, silver clip and cap ring) 31D (with "manifold" nib) 32P (cartridge filling system) 34P (cartridge filling system) As you can see, the 12/14/72/74/82/84 is Meisterstück range already, they are very well made, the plastic is very robust for Meisterstück range. The medium range (22/24) and economy range (31/32/34) is very well made, too. However, I did receive some reports saying that the 32's plastic developed cracks. I do have more than 10 economy range pens (32/34), they are all in NOS or near mint condition, no crack at all. I guess this really depends on the condition of the pen. The size: First I would like to show a picture of Montblanc 14/12/24/22/34/32 (from left to the right in Figure 1). The pens follow a 2 digit coding system, the second digit is most likely to be 2 or 4 --> 2 stands for regular size, 4 stands for large size. And for economy range, there are pens coded as 31, they are still regular size, the 1 just stands for regular size with steel nib (most of the economy range are equipped with 14k gold nibs). Figure 1. Montblanc 14/12/24/22/34/32 The 12/14 Series: It is very well summarized by "soapytwist" in a previous post (https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/132995-montblanc-12-22-and-32/), but there are some mistakes, I will just quote and make the correction. Please give the credit to him. The 12/14 series are equipped with: 1. 18k "butterfly" nib 2. Push on cap 3. Bishop's mitre cap band 4. Amber/brown, faceted ink window 5. Gold accent band on piston knob end Please check: Figure 2 to see the Montblanc 14/12 with cap off. Figure 3&4 to see the 18k "butterfly" nib on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 5&6 to see the feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 7&8 to see the assembled feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 9 to see the assembled section of a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 10 to see the Gold accent band on piston knob end of a Montblanc 12/14/72/74 Figure 11 to see the cap top of a Montblanc 12/14 Figure 12 to see the Bishop's mitre cap band of a Montblanc 12/14 Figure 13&14 see the cap of a Montblanc 72/74 Figure 2. Montblanc 14/12 with cap off Figure 3. 18k "butterfly" nib on a Montblanc 17/74/84/94 Figure 4. 18k "butterfly" nib on a Montblanc 17/74/84/94 Figure 5. Feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 6. Feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 7. Assembled feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 8. Assembled feed and feed housing on a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 9. Assembled section of a Montblanc 14/74/84/94 Figure 10. Gold accent band on piston knob end of a Montblanc 12/14/72/74 Figure 11. Cap top of a Montblanc 12/14 Figure 12. Bishop's mitre cap band of a Montblanc 12/14 Figure 13. Cap of a Montblanc 72/74 Figure 14. Cap of a Montblanc 72/74
  10. omarcenaro

    Xrays Of Montblanc

    I know many of y'all have stayed up at night thinking "I wonder what a Montblanc looks like when x-rayed". Well, I am here today to finally answer this age old question, lol. As I am the Chief (and the Indian) of Radiology where I work I said lets do it. Actually, several times during the week I fire a test shot of the x-ray equipment after its been restarted or calibrated in the morning in order to confirm that its ready to shot during the day. Usually I shot my Iphone or keys. Today I had my 147 Traveller that had not been inked up yet and thought lets tested on that. Well, here are the results: Montblanc 147 Traveller Posted Nib Hope y'all enjoyed that. As I bring in other pens I will xrays them as well. Cheer, Ozzy
  11. Hello, Everybody, To me it is a bit of sad and sentimental story, yet life goes on. Perhaps it’s worth sharing, please pardon me if not so… My one and only “friction fit mechanism” 149, with 18C architect grind nib started failing after 45+ years of continuos use. It started developing hairline cracks in the section. I have treated the pen neither badly, nor like a piece of jewelry. Being a valuable part of my every day reality it has traveled with me all around the world for 40+ years. Material fatigue, perhaps… As I know nothing about “precious resin” solvent welding (any shared experience would be more than appreciated), my only option was getting a replacement 1963 type barrel. Those who had it tried to charge for it almost as much as for a new pen, without mint condition warranty, so it was not a secure and afforfable option. Luckily, a friend had an entire 1967 type (screw-in “threaded” mechanism) spare body, which cost me just a fraction of what I’d have paid for a 1963 barrel only. I knew my 149 would become a sturdier, heavier pen, with less ink storage capacity than the one I got used to. It made me feel a little reluctant, but I eventually decided to go for it. So, I just “transplanted” the nib unit and cap to the newer body. It is still a great pen, almost as much a marvel of engineering as the old one, just feeling somewhat more robust, with weight distribution slightly reminding of the 50s celluloid ones. Yet, my trusty “friction-fit” is gone for good, or at least until I arrange a barrel I can afford, or hopefully learn solvent-welding MB “precious resin”. 🙂
  12. I came across this post about the launch of the new Jimi Hendrix Great Characters Ink by Montblanc. It interested me because I have been looking to buy some purple ink. I have tried inks from Pelikan, Diamine, and Pilot Iroshizuku. When I started searching for other inks in the range, I came across the Enzo Ferrari Great characters ink, which is also purple. I was wondering if anyone here has a sample of both inks side by side on paper? It's hard to find ink swabs on paper for these two online!
  13. I ordered this on ebay from this listing: https://www.ebay.com/itm/134662348427 I had it shipped to a family member to bring it down, they are not familiar with this sort of thing. Has asked for a few pictures, and the thing that threw me off was the curved nib sticker on the body, so I got on a video call and thad them take a few more pics, not tech savvy either but I managed to get a few better pictures. I also have them run a phone flash light along the pen body and cap, it glowed red. To me everything seems ok except that sticker. Should I be worried? I have to just accept what it is at this point, don't want to bother them any more about this.
  14. Abstract:This article discusses the following issue:1. The Montblanc Meisterstück Classique 14X series products in burgundy color since 1980's2. The Montblanc Meisterstück 144 generations3. The origin and successor of Montblanc Meisterstück 144 The Montblanc Meisterstück 14X Burgundy Family:Allow me to start with 2 pictures shown below, from the left:1. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy2. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy3. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy4. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in black5. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy6. Montblanc 146 old style in black (just as a comparison)7. Montblanc 146 in burgundy (146R Bordeaux) Figure 1. The Montblanc Meisterstück 14X Burgundy FamilyFigure 2. The Montblanc Meisterstück 14X Burgundy Family Now, I will discuss the Montblanc Classique 144 generation:Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 characters:1. Monotone color 14k gold nib (figure 6) Please notice that the distance between the imprint and the shoulder of the nib is further compared to the 2nd (figure 14) and 3rd (figure 22) generation2. Ebonite feed (figure 7)3. Plastic section thresd equipped with old style Montblanc converter (figure 8)4. Cap clip reads 'GERMANY' (figure 5)5. Black section for both Black and Burgundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 3. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 4. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 5. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 6. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 7. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 8. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 9. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 10. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 1 in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 characters:1. Monotone color 14k gold nib (figure 14) Please notice that the distance between the imprint and the shoulder of the nib is shorter compared to the 1st generation (figure 6)2. Old Style Plastic feed (figure 15) -> 2nd and 3rd generation use the same old style plastic feed3. Plastic section thresd equipped with old style Montblanc converter (figure 16)4. Cap clip reads 'GERMANY' (figure 13)5. Black section for both Black and Burgundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 11. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 12. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 13. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 14. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 15. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 16. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 17. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 18. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 2 in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 characters:1. Monotone color 14k gold nib (figure 22) Please notice that the distance between the imprint and the shoulder of the nib is shorter compared to the 1st generation (figure 6)2. Old Style Plastic feed (figure 23) -> 2nd and 3rd generation use the same old style plastic feed3. Brass section thresd equipped with old style Montblanc converter (figure 24)4. Cap clip reads 'W-GERMANY' (figure 21)5. Black section for Black Montblanc Classique 144 and Bugundy section for Bugundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 19. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 20. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 21. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 22. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 23. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 24. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 25. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 26. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 3 in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 characters (discontiuned around 2004):1. Bicolor 14k gold nib (figure 31)2. New Style Plastic feed (figure 32) -> Same with Montblanc 1453. Brass section thresd equipped with new style Montblanc converter (figure 33)4. Cap clip engraved with serial number (figure 30)5. Black section for Black Montblanc Classique 144 and Bugundy section for Bugundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 27. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 28. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 29. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 30. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap)Figure 31. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 32. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 33. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 34. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 35. Montblanc 144 Classique generation 4 in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 145 Chopin characters (started around 2004):1. Bicolor 14k gold nib (figure 40), nib size is significantly smaller than Montblanc 144 Classique Series2. New Style Plastic feed (figure 41) -> Same with Montblanc 144 4th generation3. Brass section thresd equipped with new style Montblanc converter (figure 42)4. Cap clip engraved with serial number and 'GERMANY' (figure 38&39)5. Black section for Black Montblanc Classique 144 and Bugundy section for Bugundy Montblanc Classique 144 Figure 36. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap on)Figure 37. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 38. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap)Figure 39. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap)Figure 40. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Nib Detail)Figure 41. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Feed Detail)Figure 42. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Section Thread&Converter)Figure 43. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap off)Figure 44. Montblanc 145 Chopin in burgundy (Cap off) Montblanc 146R Bordeaux characters:The 146R Bordeaux model is bascially the modern Montblanc 146 in Burgundy color.1. Bicolor 14k gold nib (figure 50)2. Plastic feed (figure 51)3. Cap clip engraved with serial number and 'GERMANY' (figure 47&48) Figure 45. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap on)Figure 46. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap)Figure 47. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap)Figure 48. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap)Figure 49. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap)Figure 50. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Nib Detail)Figure 51. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Feed Detail)Figure 52. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Nib Detail)Figure 53. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Section Detail)Figure 54. Montblanc 146R Bordeaux (Cap off) Montblanc 144G From the 50'sSince the beginning the of Montblanc's 3 digits fountain pen system, XX4 stands for the standard size (nib size). For example, size wise, 149>146>144>142, here 144 is the standard size.In 1948, 144 model was first introduced to the Meisterstück family, the predecessor is the 134 model. The 144 model has the following character:1. The pen is made from celluloid2. Breath Hole on Cap (figure 59)3. Blind Cap Imprint Indicates Pen Model and Nib Size (figure 60&61)4. Bi-color 14C nib (figure62) The imprint distance from the should is closer to the Montblanc Classique 1st Generation's desgin5. Ebonite feed (figure 63)6. Telescopic piston filler Figure 55. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Box)Figure 56. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Box Open)Figure 57. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Cap)Figure 58. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Cap)Figure 59. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Cap Breath Hole)Figure 60. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Blind Cap 'EF')Figure 61. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Blind Cap '144G')Figure 62. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Nib Detail)Figure 63. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Feed Detail)Figure 64. Montblanc 144G From 50's (Section Detail) Montblanc 234 1/2 From the 40'sIn 1934, the company changed its name to Montblanc-Simplo GmbH, the famous Montblanc 3 digits was adopted. For the first digit, 1 stands for Meisterstücks (Masterpiece), 2 stands for Middle Range and 3 stands for economy range.For the second digit, 0 stands for safety filler, 2 stands for button filler and 3 stands for piston filler.For the third digit, it stands for the nib size.Here, 234 1/2 stands for Middle Range, piston filler and 4 1/2 nib size pen. Since it was during wartime, gold was not allow for pen production and alloy was used for nib material.This 234 1/2 model has the following character:1. The pen is made from celluloid2. Breath Hole on Cap (figure 69)3. Cap Imprint 'MONTBLANC' (figure 68)4. Blind Cap Imprint Indicates Pen Model and Nib Size (figure 70&71)5. Alloy nib (figure 74) 6. Ebonite feed (figure 75)7. Telescopic piston filler (figure 72&73)8. Blind Cap can be taken off (figure 77) Figure 65. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Box)Figure 66. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Box Open)Figure 67. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap)Figure 68. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap Engraving)Figure 69. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap Clip)Figure 70. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Blind Cap 'EF')Figure 71. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Blind Cap '234 1/2')Figure 72. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Telescopic Piston Filler 'D.R.R')Figure 73. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Telescopic Piston Filler '652405')Figure 74. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Nib Detail)Figure 75. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Feed Detail)Figure 76. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Section Detail)Figure 77. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Blind Cap Off)Figure 78. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Blind Cap)Figure 79. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap On)Figure 80. Montblaanc 234 1/2 (Cap Off) In the end, please enjoy the Montblanc Classique 144 Line with 145 Chopin:
  15. Hi all, I hope everyone is having a good week! I am looking to sell this fountain pen, amongst others, due to a recent change of circumstances. What is the best approach to take if I want a quick sale? Any advice or tips on marketing or value are welcome. Sakura is a very important symbol for the Japanese culture. It symbolizes beauty and transience, as well as the beginning of spring. Produced in 2002, this Sakura honors the Lady Ise and is fashioned from 18 karat rose gold highlighted with cherry blossoms painted in exquisite enamel work. Built on the Boheme chassis this exquisite pen features a retracting 18K 750 rose gold Medium (M) nib marked with Kanji characters.4 1/2 ” (11.4 cm).Limited to only 88 piece world-wide. This precious Limited Edition is a unique treasure from Montblanc Atelier. Each individual writing instrument is the work of a master craftsman and bears a specific limited edition number as proof of its exclusivity. Presented in an ivory colored box with all original packaging and papers. Thank you.
  16. I thought it would be interesting and potentially helpful to share this since I searched for converters that fit this pen but I couldn't find any. Result-wise, this is what it looks like and it works but with a little caveat, which I'll get to in a moment. Here are the steps: I started off by drilling a hole near the base of the piston stem. Then I cut off the top of the stem with a box cutter. Next, I threaded a bundle of string through and tried to push down the piston. However, the collar fits snuggly around the stem so the strings got stuck. So does the piston. To solve that, I polished the inside of the collar and the two sides of the stem with micromesh, so that the strings can fit through. Finally, it can be assembled together. I also polished the back of the stem such that it's more conical and less flat. It helps the stem to not be stuck by the collar. It does indeed draw up ink but you might have noticed a slight problem. That is you have to have a thin rod, which is a separate thing that you have to carry around, to push down the piston. It shouldn't be a problem on the desk but it's something extra you need to remember if you want to refill on the go. Length comparison: kaweco modified, international short, international long, international converter(top to bottom)
  17. I received this pen (it is a Slim Line, correct?) recently and the previous owner must have glued the section into the barrel - it won't budge. I've tried lots of soaking, ultrasonic cleaning, heat, and even penetrating oil but no go. Can the nib & feed be pulled out? If so, perhaps I can soak more with liquid getting to the other side of the threads and/or put some penetrating oil from the inside or something else. When I got it it had some ink and it really wrote beautifully. I was thinking it would be the perfect pen to carry with my notepad in my bag. It would be nice to fix but I'm about to give up ...
  18. I have recently acquired a 142G - a lovely little pen. The nib and feed seems to be pressfit assembled. How far out should the tip of the nib sit? And how far out should the feed sit? And how do I make sure that feed and nib stay in place? /Thomas
  19. copenhagenwriter

    Montblanc 146 splayed nib? Easy fix?

    I’m considering buying a pen with the pictures nib. But as is obvious it is splayed. I know that from pictures alone it’s difficult to assess the problem. From your experience- does this look like something that could be fixed? And is it a diy-fix or something that would require a professional? kind regards thomas
  20. Hello, I’d like to learn is there a solvent which works for welding cracks in Montblanc Meisterstück plastic, commercially known as “precious resin” (cracks in section, cap lip etc.). I’m familiar with techniques and tooling, only would like to know if someone could share which is the right solvent. Thanks in advance!
  21. Hello everyone, Years ago I had the opportunity to buy a faulty Montblanc Agatha Christie FP at a bargain price. I feel time has come to fix it. Before sending the pen to MB for a service quote, I'd like to know if I can fix It by myself. Any Way to put the c-ring in Place by myself? Thanks to everyone Who can help!
  22. Hello, Few days ago I was tidying my attic and I found, among my late uncles things, a box with following fountain pens. They have been sitting there for at least 20 years. I will appreciate any help with identifying, or confirming what I found on web, and also any advice on cleaning them. If you have any links to advice how to clean them, and/or restore them, please link it. Also if there is service they can be sent to (in EU). Since they all seem to be piston filling pens I intend to fill them with water, hoping it will unclog/wash residue ink and see where they leak. 1. I think this one is Montblanc 146, F (?) tip. On the piston cap is engraved 146 and F and L(?). This L looks weird, and I could not get good photo of it. Engraved on cap ring is Montblanc Masterpiece. On cap is engraved Stahlunion, which, I think, is German company which he used to work with. There also is small hole on cap. As far as I can tell, piston is not working, as I could not see any movement through ink window. Is there any way to repair it? 2. Parker 51 (?), Dove Gray, Vac filling (?), no idea of nib size. How to check for nib size? Damage on grip section, looks like it was mended with super glue. 3. I think this one is Faber Castell Osmia. Under piston cap is engraving 884, EF. Piston is working. 4. No idea for this pen. On cap is engraved Germany Rolled Gold. 5. This one is a bit strange. Looks like Montblanc. And I think it is Montblanc 254, OBB engraved on piston cap (Broad nib?). Cap is friction fit. But the nib is Pelikan, F. I guess at some point nib was changed. Or is there possibility of some cooperation between Montblanc and Pelikan? 6. This one is a bonus one. It was not in box with others. At first I thought it is fake Montblanc, but at closer inspection I found that there is engraving at the cap – Montblanc No. 12 and according to photos I saw on web it might be legit. What do you think? Cap is friction fit. Nib looks verry clogged. I don't know nib size.
  23. I bought this package of Mb Permanent Blue probably in 2014. Sticker says best before Nov15. I'm finally using them, just emptied one cartridge, and noticed...a message? The number 45 written inside the cartridge. I examined the other cartridges (see photo). The three on the left are unopened. All different numbers. Can anyone explain why these numbers were written inside the cartridges? And what they mean?
  24. In the recent times of King's Charles III ascension to the throne I have noticed the fountain pen nib he uses is very dominating - it looks really great on paper. However, I am not sure if this is just Montblanc conforming slightly differently to the other more 'standard' brands of Fountain Pen. For example, a M nib or OM feels more like a Broad etc. Are we able to tell from this image of the pen the nib? I think I can see a slightly different nib end here suggesting perhaps Oblique but wanted to see what you guys think? To me, the sidestrokes seem thinner than the downstrokes, no? I can confirm an OB is far too thick so I'm not sure if it's just a Medium or Oblique Medium?
  25. OldTravelingShoe

    20230122 LuLu Concord.jpg

    From the album: OldTravelingShoe's Random Pics of European Fountain Pens

    © (c) 2022 by OldTravelingShoe. All rights reserved.


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