Jump to content

Febeleh

Recommended Posts

Does anybody know where the Japanese Urushi Lacquer (seen on pens that have maki-e patterns, or most notably a Nakaya) can be purchased? Or how about methods of making it? I was thinking about taking a Noodler's Nib Creeper and making it into a Nakaya type pen. The clip is easily removed, to get that clean clipless look, and the entire pen can be dissasembled so it should be easy to cover it in the lacquer without hindering mechanical action. Is this even a viable idea? I just really like the look of an Urushi pen, and wanted something that isn't going to cost an arm and a leg (until I proverbially grow some extra limbs). What about color? Will the underlying color show through? I was thinking about buying a red or a black Nib Creeper so the undercolor is nicely matched.

 

Basically I want to go from this:

http://www.gouletpens.com/v/vspfiles/photos/N17004-2T.jpg

to this:

http://rudiphoto.net/img/s3/v39/p967942023.jpg

 

I know my results will vary vastly, but I think it's worth a try to see how it goes.

Any input is very much appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 11
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • KBeezie

    3

  • gwyneddd

    3

  • Febeleh

    1

  • Algester

    1

Top Posters In This Topic

I don't know much about urushi, but is the Noodler's material what will work as a base?

 

Also, the urushi is a difficult art and comes from the sap of a plant a lot like poison ivy. The urushi pens are expensive because of the time involved and the difficulty of working with the material. If you have the patience for working with the many layers and can provide a good environment, getting the material may still be difficult. Here is one source I found in a quick search:

 

Urushi Lacquer Source

 

ETA: If you are interested, I have the feeling you may need an ebonite pen as a core.

 

About Urushi pens

Edited by Waski_the_Squirrel

Proud resident of the least visited state in the nation!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I wish you a lot of luck because with urushi nothing is easy. There is a reason why it is rather expensive. You will experience it when you give it a try. I'm convinced that afterwards you will appreciate the urushi pens even more.

Catherine Van Hove

www.sakurafountainpengallery.com

 

Koning Albertstraat 72b - 3290 DIest - Belgium

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd much rather get one done professionally than risk botching up a batch of urushi lacquer, would be quite expensive to botch. Also the good looking stuff is done in multiple layers (coats).

 

Had a Platinum PTL-5000 that was painted by Engeika shop with a single coat of Urushi, which didn't take much to chip off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Urushi work when done properly, is quite complex and time consuming. See this...

 

11 June 2014 Guest post on the On Fountain Pens Blog hosted by Maybelline Tan, by Martin Pauli founder of Manu Propria, on Urushi and Lacquering Techniques:

 

http://onfountainpens.com/2014/06/guest-post-urushi-lacquering-techniques/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well,you learn something every day. Urushiol is the name for the component in poison ivy and cashew plants that gives you dermatitis. So now I know how it got that name.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well,you learn something every day. Urushiol is the name for the component in poison ivy and cashew plants that gives you dermatitis. So now I know how it got that name.

Guessing Urushi is the name of a Lacquer Tree in Japanese, whereas Urushi-e is Lacquer Picture (like Maki-e being sprinkled painting). Guessing they just decided to name it that because the Urushi tree has the same component. Least that has some kind of a connection compared to some names that seem to have nothing related other than coincidence.

 

By the way isn't the sap the lacquer is made from toxic and corrosive? Seems like working with it before it's cured would require a bit caution.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guessing Urushi is the name of a Lacquer Tree in Japanese, whereas Urushi-e is Lacquer Picture (like Maki-e being sprinkled painting). Guessing they just decided to name it that because the Urushi tree has the same component. Least that has some kind of a connection compared to some names that seem to have nothing related other than coincidence.

 

By the way isn't the sap the lacquer is made from toxic and corrosive? Seems like working with it before it's cured would require a bit caution.

 

Yes, it's toxic as a sap and when it's liquid. I have no idea how they work with it and not get that dermatitis (Hypersensitivity Type IV.) Urushi is its Japanese common name. Interestingly, mango leaves have similar components.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Yes, it's toxic as a sap and when it's liquid. I have no idea how they work with it and not get that dermatitis (Hypersensitivity Type IV.) Urushi is its Japanese common name. Interestingly, mango leaves have similar components.

 

Heh, never knew that. Might explain some things when I was a kid down in Panama.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Urushi takes about a year to cure (ie usable) and months to harvest the sap and a lot of boiling think of it like making maple syrup but you need months to just get something to use

Now question remains which tree you will use the colors you see is also affected by the material you use

But it only takes days for it to dry

Its like making a katana in a very traditional manner

Or find this tree Toxicodendron Vernicifluum also known as Laquer Tree or Urushi(漆樹)

Edited by Algester
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's an amusing "factoid" about poison ivy (Toxicodenron radicans) and their relatives. They don't grow in England. And you need TWO exposures to get the rash. So the first time you encounter it, you theoretically can bathe in the stuff and nothing happens. Then the immune system steps in and the next time you are IN TROUBLE. When I was a kid, we moved to Pennsylvania, where poison ivy is rampant. We loved the woods behind our house and as kids, couldn't stay away from exploring it. But sadly, we'd come down with massive poison ivy and need cortisone treatment which at that time, wasn't very good. We'd be in misery for a week or so. One kid actually had to be hospitalized.

 

You can't spread it from the blisters breaking, but if you have the resin on your skin (it's very sticky) or on your clothes, it "spreads" because you are getting more skin contact with it. So if you come in contact with poison ivy, you go in the house, strip off, put your clothes in the washer and give them a really good wash on hot, and you wash yourself with Fels Naptha bar soap (it's strong and can break down that resin.) Often, you'll be able to mitigate a bad case of poison ivy because you've quickly removed the resin from your skin before the immune reaction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      43844
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      33684
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. inkstainedruth
      inkstainedruth
      26908
    5. jar
      jar
      26132
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Shanghai Knife Dude
      I have the Sailor Naginata and some fancy blade nibs coming after 2022 by a number of new workshop from China.  With all my respect, IMHO, they are all (bleep) in doing chinese characters.  Go use a bush, or at least a bush pen. 
    • A Smug Dill
      It is the reason why I'm so keen on the idea of a personal library — of pens, nibs, inks, paper products, etc. — and spent so much money, as well as time and effort, to “build” it for myself (because I can't simply remember everything, especially as I'm getting older fast) and my wife, so that we can “know”; and, instead of just disposing of what displeased us, or even just not good enough to be “given the time of day” against competition from >500 other pens and >500 other inks for our at
    • adamselene
      Agreed.  And I think it’s good to be aware of this early on and think about at the point of buying rather than rationalizing a purchase..
    • A Smug Dill
      Alas, one cannot know “good” without some idea of “bad” against which to contrast; and, as one of my former bosses (back when I was in my twenties) used to say, “on the scale of good to bad…”, it's a spectrum, not a dichotomy. Whereas subjectively acceptable (or tolerable) and unacceptable may well be a dichotomy to someone, and finding whether the threshold or cusp between them lies takes experiencing many degrees of less-than-ideal, especially if the decision is somehow influenced by factors o
    • adamselene
      I got my first real fountain pen on my 60th birthday and many hundreds of pens later I’ve often thought of what I should’ve known in the beginning. I have many pens, the majority of which have some objectionable feature. If they are too delicate, or can’t be posted, or they are too precious to face losing , still they are users, but only in very limited environments..  I have a big disliking for pens that have the cap jump into the air and fly off. I object to Pens that dry out, or leave blobs o
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Files






×
×
  • Create New...