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Hakase Order Advice


Keyless Works

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  • mongrelnomad

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Beautiful pen Andrea. The case is nice but at $600 it doesn't make sense for me. I could get a celluloid Hakase for less than that. If I regularly used a pen sleeve like that maybe it would be worth it but at home, where I would be using this pen 99% of the time, I don't like to use that sort of case.

 

The construction is very nice quality and there is definitely a lot of expensive Japanese labor that goes into it. I would be in at $400.

Good day Keyless Works,

 

I most probably wouldn't have bought the case either if it was 600 dollars at that time. I agree with you that, if used only at home, the pen might not need that pen case.

 

I am curious to know if the hakase wood pens require some kind of care such application of oil or cream. When i asked GvFC about their pens they told me that the oil in our hands is enough.

Since I live in a very dry place I am always scared of cracks....

 

Regards

Edited by poppi1971

Ciao

Andrea

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Ok, reading this has renewed my interest in getting a Hakase pen. I will likely get the pen in either jade celluloid or. Cocobolo wood. I am looking at the models and am drawn to the c/d. Can someone tell the difference between these except that The G has a cap roll stop and is $400ish dollars more than the C?

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I also have a question on the turtle/tortoise material: can this not be exported out of Japan to any country? Why?

 

Good day Linger,

 

An explanation about the restrictions can be found here (from Hakase webpage - bottom of page):

 

https://fp-hakase.com/en/works/wt15d/

 

If I understand well, you can go to pick the pen up in Japan when ready and bring it back at your own risk (confiscated by customs).

 

Regards

Ciao

Andrea

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Ok, reading this has renewed my interest in getting a Hakase pen. I will likely get the pen in either jade celluloid or. Cocobolo wood. I am looking at the models and am drawn to the c/d. Can someone tell the difference between these except that The G has a cap roll stop and is $400ish dollars more than the C?

I have the same question too. From what I can see, it is only the cap roll stopper that is different.

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Ok, reading this has renewed my interest in getting a Hakase pen. I will likely get the pen in either jade celluloid or. Cocobolo wood. I am looking at the models and am drawn to the c/d. Can someone tell the difference between these except that The G has a cap roll stop and is $400ish dollars more than the C?

The rollstopper on the cap has a ring, and then the rollstopper itself. These 2 additions are for 50,000 yen 60,000 yen.

Edited by Mew
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Thanks tubular and poppi1971 - I realise I could have found that out myself...

 

Some further googling revealed more details. I paraphrase and summarise and might not get the finer details correct, but I conclude that the hawksbill sea turtle is a critically endangered species, included on the CITES red list, and as such benefits from the protection measures included in the aforementioned international agreement.

 

So the next question is why does Japan allow domestic use of material derived from a protected turtle? While being a CITES member state? Are there similarities to the whale discussion for Norway and Japan?

 

(Bytheyway, I am not judging, I am simply curious.)

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Thanks tubular and poppi1971 - I realise I could have found that out myself...

 

Some further googling revealed more details. I paraphrase and summarise and might not get the finer details correct, but I conclude that the hawksbill sea turtle is a critically endangered species, included on the CITES red list, and as such benefits from the protection measures included in the aforementioned international agreement.

 

So the next question is why does Japan allow domestic use of material derived from a protected turtle? While being a CITES member state? Are there similarities to the whale discussion for Norway and Japan?

 

(Bytheyway, I am not judging, I am simply curious.)

I believe they're farmed in Japan or elsewhere in Asia, in the same way CITES-protected alligators are for skins. I have often had issues purchasing vintage Grand and King Seikos as they often come on (pretty nasty) alligator straps and thereby cannot be exported easily. I had my tortoise-shell Hakase delivered to my Tokyo address.

 

I must say that as I get older, I find using living creatures, where avoidable, increasingly unpalatable.

Too many pens; too little writing.

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Thanks for quick reply - food for thought.

 

Farming the animal would indeed change the discussion. Harvesting them from the wild with the critically endangered status would not - that is simply morally wrong.

 

The next step would be to define "avoidable". This is a slippery slope, as opinions differ. There is no real principled difference between farming animals for food or for clothing or for appearance or for whatever. The core element being that mankind farms other animals for its own use. And as one could find replacements for (almost?) anything, it would be difficult to argue with a vegan to do so - irrespective of the purpose.

 

So ultimately it is up to the individual to justify the use of the animal for the intended purpose. I would expect a democratically derived comprehensive system to ensure animal welfare at all times and in all instances as a given - which unfortunately is not always the case...

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Thanks for quick reply - food for thought.

 

Farming the animal would indeed change the discussion. Harvesting them from the wild with the critically endangered status would not - that is simply morally wrong.

 

The next step would be to define "avoidable". This is a slippery slope, as opinions differ. There is no real principled difference between farming animals for food or for clothing or for appearance or for whatever. The core element being that mankind farms other animals for its own use. And as one could find replacements for (almost?) anything, it would be difficult to argue with a vegan to do so - irrespective of the purpose.

 

 

Well, quite - why my general consumption of all animal-based things is shrinking.

Too many pens; too little writing.

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Wouldn't the question depend in part on the conditions of the farming? I wouldn't want to be a cow or a chicken subject to factory farming, even if the species I belonged to was in no danger of extinction.

 

I say this as an uneasy wearer of leather shoes.

 

 

Mongrelnomad wrote:

Farming the animal would indeed change the discussion.
Edited by tubular
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I had an older Friend who was Vegan before you really heard about it & his footwear was a pair of tennis shoes, all year long.

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Wouldn't the question depend in part on the conditions of the farming? I wouldn't want to be a cow or a chicken subject to factory farming, even if the species I belonged to was in no danger of extinction.

 

I say this as an uneasy wearer of leather shoes.

 

 

Mongrelnomad wrote:

Farming the animal would indeed change the discussion.

For the record, it wasnt me who said that farming would change the discussion.

Too many pens; too little writing.

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mongrelnomad: If you don’t mind, could I ask for the measurements of your Rosewood flat-top pen (the last one) please? Cap length vs. barrel length (Without nib)? I like the way this proportion looks, and wonder if my pen is anything in that range of ratio. I gave Yamamoto-san some specific measurements but I prefer that it sticks to original design so it doesn’t look too different. Many thanks!

 

 

Wg3nebj.jpg

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I had planned on writing this comment out earlier about Ohasido.

 

I don't find Ohasido pens comparable to Hakase.

 

For one, there is a price-point difference by quite a bit. I also consider Hakase more upscale and are purely custom pens.

 

Secondly, Ohasido pens are much smaller (girth wise) than Hakase. I don't have a comparison between the smaller Hakase models to the Ohasido - this is based on the large Hakase models to the various Ohasido pens I've played with.

 

Another minute difference is that Ohasido pens take more cap turns out (3.5+) while Hakase is more reasonable.

 

While it sounds like I consider Ohasido a lower class of pen, I do but I like their pens and they're of good quality and offer unique designs.

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mongrelnomad: If you don’t mind, could I ask for the measurements of your Rosewood flat-top pen (the last one) please? Cap length vs. barrel length (Without nib)? I like the way this proportion looks, and wonder if my pen is anything in that range of ratio. I gave Yamamoto-san some specific measurements but I prefer that it sticks to original design so it doesn’t look too different. Many thanks!

 

Cap length is 61mm, barrel from bottom of cap is 81mm when the pen is closed. Open, from top of section (minus nib) to bottom of barrel is 115mm.

Too many pens; too little writing.

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