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Montblanc Ef Nibs



Waltz For Zizi

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Waltz For Zizi

I recently bought a used Montblanc 149, from aprox. 1985 with an EF nib, and I'm surprised to see that it has architect characteristics.

Are all EF nibs like this or did maybe the previous owner did work on it?

 

P.S. I also have a Lamy dialog 3, with an EF nib with the same architect quality to the writing, but their steel nibs don't have it.

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TassoBarbasso

Yep, could be like that out of the box. I have a Lamy Persona and a Pelikan M400 from around the same age that also have the same feature. I love it. And I'm sure it's not due to the iridium tip wearing out, because they are both NOS. My father's MB 149 M nib also has a bit of an Arabic/Hebrew effect (let's please call it with its correct name, not "architect" :) )

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Older MB 149 EF nibs can and do regularly display an architect grid like shaping. This is why some people prefer the older EF nibs.

Edited by zaddick

If you want less blah, blah, blah and more pictures, follow me on Instagram!

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Yep, could be like that out of the box. I have a Lamy Persona and a Pelikan M400 from around the same age that also have the same feature. I love it. And I'm sure it's not due to the iridium tip wearing out, because they are both NOS. My father's MB 149 M nib also has a bit of an Arabic/Hebrew effect (let's please call it with its correct name, not "architect" :) )

Why do you feel architect is not a proper name for a grind?

If you want less blah, blah, blah and more pictures, follow me on Instagram!

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I recently bought a used Montblanc 149, from aprox. 1985 with an EF nib, and I'm surprised to see that it has architect characteristics.

fpn_1566577871__68974969-108d-48f1-8e26-

 

Same here! Love it! It’s why I bought my old 146. Mine has a nib that’s stamped 14C. It’s mirror smooth provided you maintain the proper writing angle. When writing as I do in the sample above, the line variation is wonderful. When writing cursive italic, line with is on the BB side of B, which is not what I like, so i rarely use it for cursive italic.

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Yes, I have a EF Carbon Steel (146 size) from early 2000s and it also has this architect like grind. At first I wasnt sure I liked it, but now that Ive been writing with it for nearly 20 years, Ive come to really enjoy it.

 

As Zaddick mentioned, this is somewhat commonplace on MB EF nibs. I also learned this on the Nib Section podcast. If you havent heard of this podcast, do yourself a favor and give it a listen. Its a few Australian fountain pen collectors/users getting together every two weeks and discussing fountain pens. Very entertaining and informative.

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I will exchange my LeGrand 146 F nib with a EF nib waiting to be available I will check when i receive it. Thanks for the info. .

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Yes, I have a EF Carbon Steel (146 size) from early 2000s and it also has this architect like grind. At first I wasnt sure I liked it, but now that Ive been writing with it for nearly 20 years, Ive come to really enjoy it.

 

As Zaddick mentioned, this is somewhat commonplace on MB EF nibs. I also learned this on the Nib Section podcast. If you havent heard of this podcast, do yourself a favor and give it a listen. Its a few Australian fountain pen collectors/users getting together every two weeks and discussing fountain pens. Very entertaining and informative.

 

Plus 10,000!

"Storyteller, unfold thy words untold!"

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I got a new EF nib for my 146 as I dropped the pen and mangled my wonderfully architect ground factory EF. The new nib did not have enough architect character so I sent it back to Montblanc, and they sent it to Germany to have a "mastercraftsman" regrind it for me (under nib warranty), what wonderful service. It came back with a stubbish grind. I adore the nib. I didn't think a stubbish EF was possible, but Montblanc did it. It is one of my finest nibs, making my Lamy Safari EF feel like a medium. Even finer than the Pilot Falcon SF which was the finest nib in my collection.

Edited by max dog
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Good morning Waltz For ZiZi,

 

Yes, I agree with you completely. I have several two-tone 14C EF and F nibs on 149s I purchased new in the late 1970s and very early 80s with exactly the nib you have described. They are wide on the horizontal and narrow on vertical. I am left handed and have a complete overhook, actually holding the pen upside down with nib facing me as I write. At first, I did not like the way these nibs wrote, but became used to them rather quickly. There are other 149 F nibs I own from the same era which do not have this characteristic. I believe Montblanc was simply being generous with its iridium beads in those days. Will post photos later. Don't have one of these filled at the moment.

 

By the way, my wife has two MB 144s, both with EF nibs with the same architect-Arabic-Hebrew characteristics. Hers date from the later 1980s or 90s, I believe. I bought one new & one used, but can't remember exactly when.

 

Thank you for confirming something I have observed often but have not discussed much with other 149 fans.

Enjoy the remainder of your weekend. By your flag, it seems the weekend has nearly passed.

Best wishes,

Barry

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TassoBarbasso

Why do you feel architect is not a proper name for a grind?

As a very well-respected nibmeister once explained to me, this grind has been around for centuries (on reed pens first, now on FPs) as the go-to way to cut a pen for Semitic languages calligraphy. Then, since the rise of jihadi Islamism, the Palestinian intifada and certain Israeli settlement policies, many people stopped using the term Arabic/Hebrew for fear that this would sound too political. Hence the spread of the term architect grind which is not rooted in history or anything, really.

 

I just feel that a calligraphy grind that carries so much history, beauty, art and culture should not be renamed only because some people years ago spuriously associated it to some recent political developments :)

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^—-Sounds awesome! Can you share a writing sample? I’d like to see that.

Here is a writing sample with the new 146 EF nib. The stubbish line variation is very subtle of course, but exists.

fpn_1548308472__mb_146_jan_23_2019a.jpg

fpn_1548308509__mb_146_jan_23_2019_writi

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~ max dog:

 

The handwriting sample comparison above is especially helpful.

Thank you for making it available.

That's quite an eye-catching pen!

Yours truly loves Montblanc EF nibs.

It's encouraging to see that many others feel likewise.

Tom K.

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As a very well-respected nibmeister once explained to me, this grind has been around for centuries (on reed pens first, now on FPs) as the go-to way to cut a pen for Semitic languages calligraphy. Then, since the rise of jihadi Islamism, the Palestinian intifada and certain Israeli settlement policies, many people stopped using the term Arabic/Hebrew for fear that this would sound too political. Hence the spread of the term architect grind which is not rooted in history or anything, really.

 

I just feel that a calligraphy grind that carries so much history, beauty, art and culture should not be renamed only because some people years ago spuriously associated it to some recent political developments :)

Thank you for sharing your insights.

If you want less blah, blah, blah and more pictures, follow me on Instagram!

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Here is a writing sample with the new 146 EF nib. The stubbish line variation is very subtle of course, but exists.

Thanks!

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~ max dog:

 

 

The handwriting sample comparison above is especially helpful.

Thank you for making it available.

That's quite an eye-catching pen!

Yours truly loves Montblanc EF nibs.

It's encouraging to see that many others feel likewise.

Tom K.

Hi Tom. Great to hear from you! Hope you you are doing well. Great to catch up on all your magnificent posts and pictures here!
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