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Inexpensive, Fat-Sectioned Pen?

section grip inexpensive

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51 replies to this topic

#21 Lester Brooke

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 03:26

The Huashi 90 should be considered. I got mine for less than 10 € on eBay.A smoother grip than the Wing Sung 590 which I also have, because the cap of the Huashi is the slip on type. The grip is even a bit wider than the W 590 . I find the pen extremely comfortable. It is a sac filler though, so changing inks often is not practical if You just  that pen. Maybe owning a bunch of Huashis 90, each one with a different ink could be an option? There is also a "Fude" version which I I have been tempted to buy, for a long time, because I really like fude nibs. But I haven't the need for more pens, and the fude version is only sold in a bundle with a regular version. I had spared myself some fighting with my pen craving had I got myself the bundle right away.



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#22 mrwlfc

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 23:24

I have a Conklin All-American I got on ebay for around 25 dollars new.  It retails for far more than that, but if you can get it for $50 or under, its a great big pen with a nice fat section.  I love it for long writing sessions! 


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#23 Tanipat

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Posted 15 July 2018 - 08:44

How about the Pilot Kakuno.



#24 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 15 July 2018 - 17:33

The Noodler's Konrad is listed at 10.3 mm by Goulet. It may have some of the same challenges as an Ahab however.

Brad
 
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#25 tvradio

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Posted 18 July 2018 - 19:53

How about the Pilot Kakuno.

I have one. I would not call the section fat; the Preppy/Plaisir is actually thicker.


Edited by tvradio, 18 July 2018 - 19:53.

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#26 chravagni

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Posted 19 July 2018 - 00:49

A little above the price range, the Lamy Aion. Wonderful nib, thick section, heavy. Lamy has cheaper thick pens as well (Nexx, ABC), lighter and more school oriented.
Chiara

#27 MuddyWaters

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Posted 19 July 2018 - 03:13

I wrestled with this a long time. A lot of the suggestions in this thread are frankly too expensive for the writing experience you get. This applies especially to Indian pens that often have heavily tapering sections to begin with.

 

I bought about 30 pens to find the right one. A lot had good nibs, but the body wasn't right. It hurt my fingers because I was gripping too hard when the section was too narrow. I found my personal solution (for now).

 

I bought a lot of cheap Chinese pens to check different bodies. I found the 159 is a nice dimension but again too heavy. The real turning point happened when I realized that a light pen with a substantial body can be comfortably held with the finger-up position (you can search on this board) so long as the barrel end was chunky enough to be firmly grabbed and stable in the web of my thumb and index. The pen that I found perfect for this were the Wing Sung 3008, 698 (Twsbi copies) and the 6539 (Al-Star copies). Both these types of pens do not have very thick sections but they have long bodies that are stable at their end of the barrel, and this I found to lead to less pressure on the end of my fingers at the joints.

 

As Asian pens, they also have nibs without baby's bottoms and don't require much pressure to write. If you like the Platinum Preppy, this is a good option and won't set you back much. A lot of this is in weight of pen, length, girth of the body, and positioning of your grip.

 

edit: http://www.fountainp...ic-tripod-grip/

 

check the OP here. See the first picture? When the index and thumb close in on the end of the pen, I like a substantial feeling of stability there (I do tend to grasp my pens a bit tighter also because these fine nibs do have some feedback and I write fast, so haven't mastered gliding completely)


Edited by MuddyWaters, 19 July 2018 - 03:17.

Link to a post about ergonomics I made: http://www.fountainp...with/?p=4179072


#28 tvradio

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 00:53

I wrestled with this a long time. A lot of the suggestions in this thread are frankly too expensive for the writing experience you get. This applies especially to Indian pens that often have heavily tapering sections to begin with.

 

I bought about 30 pens to find the right one. A lot had good nibs, but the body wasn't right. It hurt my fingers because I was gripping too hard when the section was too narrow. I found my personal solution (for now).

 

I bought a lot of cheap Chinese pens to check different bodies. I found the 159 is a nice dimension but again too heavy. The real turning point happened when I realized that a light pen with a substantial body can be comfortably held with the finger-up position (you can search on this board) so long as the barrel end was chunky enough to be firmly grabbed and stable in the web of my thumb and index. 

Thanks. Unfortunately for me, I an am overwriting lefty and when I write my nib is almost upside down - the nib is aimed just past my right shoulder. So the grip and handling you describe just cannot work for me.

 

I like the Jinhao 159 quite a bit. I don't think it's too heavy (uncapped, as I use all my pens) and the thickness is gloriously comfortable. After decades using typical ballpoints, pencils and rollerballs it was incredibly eye-opening for me to be able to write with a thick-sectioned, super-smooth writing pen. It helped me learn how much thin pens contributed to hand fatigue and pain I'd experience for so long. That said, I do like light pens, maybe even prefer them. It's hard to say. I've gone through a couple of dozen inexpensive Chinese and Japanese pens since I started with this hoby last November, pens ranging from $1-$25. And despite liking the feel of the 159 I've had nothing but feed and stop-start problems with the several Jinhaos I've owned.

 

If there were such a thing as a plastic model 159 with a solid feed system and nib I'd be so happy.

 

The smoothest writing experience I've had with a pens I've owned was my Metropolitan (section WAY too thin for me, though). So I decided to try a couple of other Pilots. I got a Kakuno and I like it, but the nib isn't quite as good. Same for a Petit1 I bought, and a 78G a friend lent me. 

 

I'm meh-to-okay with the section thickness of my Preppys/Plaisir, but the interior section unit does not come apart for cleaning. The nibs are decent, more than acceptable for the price. So I'm thinking next of getting a Platinum Cool/Balance (available some places under $30), which has a different (improved?) steel nib and a completely disassembleable section. But again, I'd prefer something thicker-sectioned. 


Edited by tvradio, 20 July 2018 - 00:54.

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#29 woleizihan

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 00:55

You already have a metro so WIng Sung 698 is a good choice because you can swap in the Pilot nib. 



#30 tvradio

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 13:47

You already have a metro so WIng Sung 698 is a good choice because you can swap in the Pilot nib. 

That's a thought! But... I just looked up the section width from SBREBrown's review and the center of the section is only 9.2mm - definitely better than the Metro's puny 8.4mm, but less than my minimum preferred 10mm. (By comparison, my Kakuno's section at its narrowest is 10.4mm and I feel it's a bit too narrow for writing more than a page.)


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#31 Karmachanic

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 15:44

The section on the Wing Sung 698 is tapered. I hold on the threads, (finger up), which is wider, and not in the least uncomfortable. Give it a try.


"Simplicate and add Lightness."


#32 tvradio

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 12:50

I hold all my pens pretty close to the nib, so my finger go right into the narrowest part of a section, and a tapered 9.2mm section would unfortunately not work for me. Currently my Kakuno and Preppys/Plaisir have the widest sections I use (10mm) but I'd really like something that feels wider, while remaining light, affordable and with good ink feed and smooth steel M nibs. 


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#33 rochester21

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 15:37

Lamy ABC, Jinhao 159. The Jinhao is a best buy if you don't mind the weight, very comfortable and a smooth nib.

Tip: never trust chinese converters, buy a quality one(ex. Waterman) and stick it in.

Edited by rochester21, 25 July 2018 - 15:38.


#34 SoulSamurai

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 18:12

never trust chinese converters, buy a quality one(ex. Waterman) and stick it in.

In my very limited experience Jinhao pens use an ink cartridge that looks like a standard international, but actually has a slightly larger mouth so that a standard international cartridge will often split open when fitted on a Jinhao. I guess that's less of a problem with converters because they are more sturdy?

#35 rochester21

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 18:38

In my very limited experience Jinhao pens use an ink cartridge that looks like a standard international, but actually has a slightly larger mouth so that a standard international cartridge will often split open when fitted on a Jinhao. I guess that's less of a problem with converters because they are more sturdy?

 

Ok, i just checked and you`re right, a standard converter doesn`t fit a Jinhao. The good news is that the converter in my jinhao 992 for instance is a new generation, with different design that appears to be better made than the stuff they used to fit their pens with. So there is hope. However, what i wrote about generic chinese converters still apply. I had to chuck dozens of them because they would make the pens drip ink. Actually, if i remember correctly the pens in question were jinhao 599s, first or second generation. Like i said though, they changed those and the latest version look and feel better. 

 

Anyway, i believe the thickest pen i ever held in my hand was the Lamy ABC. I can`t provide any measurements since i sold it, but maybe someone else might be able to help. It literally looks like a toy, but it has a thick section, a nice wood body, not heavy and it`s pretty cheap, so i think it fits the bill. Mind you, not many pens at this price point are made from real wood :)


Edited by rochester21, 25 July 2018 - 18:55.


#36 tvradio

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Posted 26 July 2018 - 01:11

Lamy ABC, Jinhao 159. The Jinhao is a best buy if you don't mind the weight, very comfortable and a smooth nib.

Tip: never trust chinese converters, buy a quality one(ex. Waterman) and stick it in.

As I mentioned I have and love the feel of my 159, but all my Jinhaos - X750, 159, another model I can't remember - have all had start/stop feed issues. Even buying replacement Jowo nibs didn't help. So I'm out of that game.... hence my starting this thread.

 

Because of my writing grip, Lamy and TWSBI pens with triangular sections don't work for me. I bought and gave away a couple of Lamys last year. I did buy a Kakuno because its nib can rotate inside the section, this allowing me to use its triangular grip. But, as I noted, the section's narrowness is not ideal.


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#37 surprise123

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Posted 26 July 2018 - 21:23

I'm looking for a reliable daily writer, an inexpensive - let's say under $50 - fountain pen with a section that's 10.5mm-12.4mm in width.
 
As I continue to learn more about fountain pens I find that I like thicker sections. My favorite nib still has to be on my Metropolitan M, but the 8.4mm section (acccording to the GouletPens site) is so narrow it's painful for me two write more than a half page with it, so had to I clean it out & put it away. 
 
My main writers are a bunch of F and M Preppy and Plaisirs, and a M Kakuno. Their 10mm sections' widths are just about the minimum I can write with for long periods, but I'd love something a bit thicker. (I'mfine with light pens though, and I prefer to write unposted.) My favorite-feeling pen I've used is the Jinhao 159, which GouletPens notes has a 12.4mm section. But I've had terrible, repeated issues with all my Jinhaos drying out and hard-starting (using various inks), as well as occasional feed problems with two different replacement Jowo B nibs. If I could get a Jinhao 159 that didn't dry out I'd be in heaven, but the pen's design (and the cheap plastic feeds, which sometimes reseat the nibs after continued use) are design issues that I don't think can be avoided.
 
From my research one possible pen option I came across that's close to my needs might be Monteverde's Giant Sequoia, which is a bit outside my budget, and bigger/heavier than I'm used to. Azizah's review says the section is 10.8mm which might could work well for me.
 
Are there any decent thicker-grip pens I should consider in my price range?


Vintage. I got a sumgai priced Duofold Sr. with a fat section for $50. Sac cost me 6 dollars.

#38 surprise123

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Posted 26 July 2018 - 21:25

As I mentioned I have and love the feel of my 159, but all my Jinhaos - X750, 159, another model I can't remember - have all had start/stop feed issues. Even buying replacement Jowo nibs didn't help. So I'm out of that game.... hence my starting this thread.
 
Because of my writing grip, Lamy and TWSBI pens with triangular sections don't work for me. I bought and gave away a couple of Lamys last year. I did buy a Kakuno because its nib can rotate inside the section, this allowing me to use its triangular grip. But, as I noted, the section's narrowness is not ideal.


You can make the skipping problem on chinese pens go away by passing the feeds extremely quickly through a flame, then tracing the main feed channel with a craft razor (x acto) multipule times. All chinese manufacturing has a layer of mystery substance on them. Also get a good converter for them.

#39 sansenri

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Posted 26 July 2018 - 22:35

I would also recommend either the Bexley Prometheus for a fairly higher budget ($80-90) but also a Ranga in the larger size models (3, 4, and the huge 5). If you choose an ED model the price is very close to your budget, and the ebonite feed provides a very nice flow.

 

here is a comparison model 5 vs model 3c (sorry for bad focusing in this pic)

fpn_1517698579__p1080647b.jpg

 

 

here is the Bexley

fpn_1532644455__p1150436-3.jpg

 



#40 Brianm-14-FRMS

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 05:53

Forgive me if I am coming to this so late:

I've had luck cleaning up the Chinese feeds with repeated cleanings using diluted Dawn or a similar detergent in cool water containing ammonia solution, and lightly scrubbing with a new cheap SOFT bristled toothbrush. I am not so sure that a pass with some toothpaste on it might not help, as well.
Soaking will not do the trick.

As alluded above, there seems to be some surface material on the Chinese feeds left from manufacture. Flames and cutting edges may work, but sound a bit drastic.

I can only add that I think part of your answer is likely to be in modifying the pen, and part in modifying your grip.

Have your ever thought of making a custom built-up grip on a pen you like, using a plastic material or epoxy-type substance affixed to the pen? Then mold it to your fingers, and carefully, bit-by-bit sand it to fit? I'd suggest trying something other than epoxy, because that may not adhere well to a pen's surface, and it is all too possible to develop a terrible allergy to the epoxy dust over time. A craft shop could likely help a lot. You'd just be makiking a custom grip; these are made commonly in sports and medicine. Ask around. As they say, so man is an island!

You might be on to something of great interest and help to many people. Get the ball rolling, and others may jump on board to help.
Brian





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