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Depository Of Handwriting And Calligraphy Styles and Discussion


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153 replies to this topic

#41 rodrigaj

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 15:54

Gothic Batarde #14

The "o - r" combination in the followup post (....but never more...) is interesting.

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#42 kenfraser

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 21:41

Business Writing #42

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Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 09:24.


#43 kenfraser

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 21:42

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Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 06:03.


#44 kenfraser

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 21:42

The alphabet 'Business Writing'#18 was written with a Pelikan fountain pen fitted with a round-tipped nib, as was the example in post 19#.

The ink for both was Higgins Eternal and the paper was Conqueror smooth white.

Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 06:03.


#45 kenfraser

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 21:58

Handwritten Clerestory #45

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Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 09:24.


#46 WestLothian

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 22:03

Ken, thanks for this very useful reference I hope it can become a repository as well as a depository :doh:

I like your #2 Copperplate samples particularly.
I have one observation to discuss; the initial hairline and loop of your G seems heavier than I have seen.
Do you have an original exemplar of this form that you could show or provide as a reference?

A great idea.

#47 kenfraser

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 22:11

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Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 06:04.


#48 kenfraser

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 22:15

In both posts, 'Handwritten Clerestory'#21 and #22 the lettering was written with a Rotring Artpen fitted with an edged nib. The paper was Mondi IQ Selection
100gsm white and the ink was Higgins Eternal black.
This is a handwritten version of the Clerestory font.

The large letter 'B' was drawn.

Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 06:04.


#49 kenfraser

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 22:36

Do you have an original exemplar of this form that you could show or provide as a reference?


In Dick Jackson's 'Copperplate Calligraphy', he uses that form of G.

Thanks for your comments.

Ken

Edited by caliken, 16 July 2012 - 07:13.


#50 tdzb36

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 07:27

Thanks everybody !!!It will be very helpful for me!I like Spencerian Engrosser’s Script and Italic very much! :rolleyes:

Edited by tdzb36, 16 July 2012 - 07:31.


#51 tdzb36

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 07:38

Business Writing #18 ,It will be very helpful for me!!Please ask me that in practice writing calligraphy, how to control the spacing between the letters,Thanks....

#52 rodrigaj

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 08:55

Italic #4

Ken - I always thought of the "r" as a member of the "h, m, n, r" group. That is, the arch is a shared characteristic. I think that is the way Lloyd J. Reynolds treats it in his classic Italic Calligraphy and Handwriting Exercises and Text 1969 book.

I have seen many interpretations of the italic hand that use your "r", but I have always liked Reynolds' version best.

No criticism intended, just a general comment. Thank you for what is turning out to be a very enlightening thread.

#53 kenfraser

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 11:24

Business Writing #18 ,It will be very helpful for me!!Please ask me that in practice writing calligraphy, how to control the spacing between the letters,Thanks....

I'm not sure if there is any hard and fast rule about inter-letter spacing with this script. Once you get the hang of the general shape and angle of the linking ligatures, the spacing does tend to take care of itself.
Others may have a more useful guide, than this.

#54 tdzb36

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 12:30

Business Writing #18 ,It will be very helpful for me!!Please ask me that in practice writing calligraphy, how to control the spacing between the letters,Thanks....

I'm not sure if there is any hard and fast rule about inter-letter spacing with this script. Once you get the hang of the general shape and angle of the linking ligatures, the spacing does tend to take care of itself.
Others may have a more useful guide, than this.


Thanks caliken,According to your suggestion!I will try to practice angle of the linking ligatures.So I have another question about Uncial #6 .What is the difference between Uncial and Celtic,I find these two kinds of script look the same。 :unsure:

#55 kenfraser

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 07:48

I have another question about Uncial #6 .What is the difference between Uncial and Celtic,I find these two kinds of script look the same。 :unsure:

To the best of my knowledge :blink: , in respect of lettering styles, the two are interchangeable......probably Uncial is the more correct title, historically.

#56 Jimmy Joe

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 18:43

I have another question about Uncial #6 .What is the difference between Uncial and Celtic,I find these two kinds of script look the same。 :unsure:

To the best of my knowledge :blink: , in respect of lettering styles, the two are interchangeable......probably Uncial is the more correct title, historically.

I take "Celtic" to usually mean Insular Majuscule script (e.g. The Book of Kells), a development from Roman Half-Uncial, or a modern variation thereof. Uncial proper is a Roman script. However, it looks quite "Celtic" to most modern readers who associate Roman script solely with Square Capitals--the script used in carvings--and maybe Roman Rustic if they've ever seen it.

#57 kenfraser

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 20:28

I take "Celtic" to usually mean Insular Majuscule script (e.g. The Book of Kells), a development from Roman Half-Uncial, or a modern variation thereof. Uncial proper is a Roman script. However, it looks quite "Celtic" to most modern readers who associate Roman script solely with Square Capitals--the script used in carvings--and maybe Roman Rustic if they've ever seen it.


Sorry!.......history was never my strong point.

Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 06:05.


#58 tdzb36

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 22:39

I have another question about Uncial #6 .What is the difference between Uncial and Celtic,I find these two kinds of script look the same。 :unsure:

To the best of my knowledge :blink: , in respect of lettering styles, the two are interchangeable......probably Uncial is the more correct title, historically.



Thank you very much,I am reading books about calligraphy in the library recently.I am interested in Celtic.I know Uncial before.so I can not distinguish the difference between Uncial and Celtic.OK!but now I know. :roflmho:

#59 tdzb36

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 22:46

I have another question about Uncial #6 .What is the difference between Uncial and Celtic,I find these two kinds of script look the same。 :unsure:

To the best of my knowledge :blink: , in respect of lettering styles, the two are interchangeable......probably Uncial is the more correct title, historically.

I take "Celtic" to usually mean Insular Majuscule script (e.g. The Book of Kells), a development from Roman Half-Uncial, or a modern variation thereof. Uncial proper is a Roman script. However, it looks quite "Celtic" to most modern readers who associate Roman script solely with Square Capitals--the script used in carvings--and maybe Roman Rustic if they've ever seen it.



:thumbup: This information is great help for me!From the historical point of view I think I can distinguish their different.Thanks!

#60 kenfraser

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 08:53

Foundational Hand #60

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Edited by HDoug, 01 August 2012 - 09:05.







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