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Hakase 29018


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#1 rhk

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 12:57

On May 2nd 2008 I sent an order form to Hakase, a small pen making company in Tottori, Japan. I have scanned a folder they sent me, it is available on the web with very short explanations. Click on the pages for larger images. Hakase makes few pens, I read in another post by someone who visited their factory that they make approximately 20 pens per month. They do not carry any stock, so one has to wait. Kindly, Hakase tried to charge my credit card only when they started making the pen, in April of this year, no deposit asked. AMEX declined the transaction at first, thinking this was some kind of scam. However, after I phoned with amex the transaction came through. On May 1st 2009 UPS tried to deliver the package, but I was at work at that moment. On May 4th I could stay home long enough to receive the package and pay the associated import duties.

First impressions 4.5/5

Hakase has its own wrapping paper. The pen is shipped in a small wooden box, and inside is a velvet bed that had the pen. The pen was wrapped in paper. The box also contained the small cardboard box of a con70 convertor, with the convertor already being inserted in the pen. Also, it had some kind of manual. If anyone would be able to tell me the highlighted recommendations, I would be most grateful.

(Wrapping)


(Manual page 1)


(manual page 2)



Appearance (5/5)

This is a unique pen, if only because every Hakase pen is custom made. Moreover, the material is horn from water buffalo, and no two pens made of such a natural product can be truly identical. Of course, the elements that stand out from the design are the band on the barrel, and the clip. This pen is described in the Hakase folder as one with minimal trim, and that certainly is correct. All trim is made from 14k gold, no gold plating here. The clip is very small, and stiff. It is not ideal for routinely carrying this pen in a breast pocket. The golden band on the barrel has a little bump, that prevents the pen from rolling if you would put it on a desk without the cap. The band is hammered gold, tan-kin, similar to the silver fountain pen made by Platinum. On the end of the barrel is an engraving"042009" that indicates the month of production. Note how the bump on the band and the clip align perfectly (Visconti: why does the blind cap on my Wall Street pen not align with the barrel?) if one startes screwing the cap in the right thread. By now i know how to start attaching the cap such that the bump and the clip align. The section is screwed on the barrel with only one entry point, and the bump aligns with the nib. Very good.

(pen closed)


(band and date)



Design/size/weight (4.5/5)

Capped, the pen weighs 34gr, uncapped it is 20gr. Very comfortable. Its length is 145mm (slightly longer than the Hakase pen #2009 that I have), and the diameter at the barrel near section is 15mm.

Nib (6/5)

OK, now for the writing characteristics. The nib is a generous #15 nib, made by Pilot. It is single tone, and has "1934", a Hakase emblem, and "14k585" engraved. The company was founded in 1934. This nib writes very well, it is smooth and has not skipped a single bit since I started to use it. I don't exert much pressure, still it has a good flow. I love this nib.

(pen open)


(nib)


(writing samples)


Filling system (5/5)

The pen fills using the large capacity con70 convertor by Pilot, and of course one can also use Pilot cartridges. I do not have the slightest inclination to experiment whether or not it can be converted to an eyedropper. The pen is a bit of a wet writer, so it is good that a large capacity convertor is included. I am not hesitant to dip the section of this pen in an ink bottle, I have not done that with my Hakase #2009 made of cocobola wood, because I am afraid that the wood will stain.

(convertor)


Cost and value

This pen is valuable if only because of 12 months of anticipation. Unfortunately, it did not slip through customs unnoticed. I like it very much that the pen is made completely out of natural material. Of course it is expensive, but I am sure I will enjoy this pen for a long time. Stock index funds have depreciated by, say, 40%, and a pen like this will provide continuous joy for a long time to come. Where should your money be?

Conclusion (total evaluation: 4.5/5)

A great pen this is, made by a company that makes as little as a few hundred pens per year. Hakase pens are rare, and of very high quality. I am most happy with it.

(from left to right: Pilot Custom 823, Hakase #29018, Sailor King of Pen)







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#2 MYU

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 13:56

clap1.gif Congratulations on your purchase, Ruud! It's a fine pen and you've done it good justice with your review. Hakase has focused their energies on crafting the body and furniture, leaving the nib and converter to the well respected Pilot Pen corporation. I had no idea they used a Pilot no.15 nib in their pens! What a great choice, rather than going to all the effort of creating their own--why not leverage a great nib that already exists, right? I recently got the chance to experience this nib by purchasing a Custom 845. It's a fantastically smooth and forgiving nib--one of the best I've written with. smile.gif

The other benefit is the CON-70 converter. I think it's the best converter out there. Quick, easy, generous capacity, and smooth function. thumbup.gif

Cheers,
~Gary

Edited by MYU, 17 May 2009 - 13:59.

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#3 Inka

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 14:05

I own a few knives with water buffalo scales [scales = proper name for outer grips on knives], so I know the look and feel of the material.
The band "bump" is an interesting idea, first time I've seen that used to keep a pen from rolling and better idea IMO than cutting flats all around the barrel.
Congrats on what seems like a pen you've gone to great lengths, time, money to obtain; may it truly bring you many years of joy and happiness.
“I view my fountain pens & inks as an artist might view their brushes and paints.
They flow across paper as a brush to canvas, transforming my thoughts into words and my words into art.
There is nothing else like it; the art of writing and the painting of words!”

~Inka~ [Scott]; 5 October, 2009

#4 hari317

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 15:33

Thank you Ruud, I was looking forward to this review. It is truly a very rare pen with an unusual design and your documentation of it is much appreciated. From the photos it looks like the section is also made from buffalo horn and the feeder used is different from the usual Pilot plastic feeders. Would it be possible to take a closeup shot of the nib showing the engraving?

Warm Regards,
Hari

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#5 Nikolaos

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 16:10

Thanks for the great review Ruud. A gorgeous pen. I need to plan out buying a Hakase pen at some stage as well. I love the #15 Pilot nib on my Custom 823. As Gary said above one of the best nibs out there.
Today though i am using my recently purchased Namiki Emperor Vermilion with a gigantic #50 fine nib and the pen feels and writes like a dream happyberet.gif

By the way, are the trays you display the pens in Romero Llopis ? I recently bought a 36 pen Romero Llopis display from P.W. Akkerman and the trays look very similar to yours.

Hope we can meet sometime soon, i would love to see your Hakase in real life


Nikolaos

#6 FrankB

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 18:40

Thank you. I have also been looking forward to this review.

I recall I became familiar with the Hakasa name through Lambrou's Fountain Pens of the World. Shortly after getting the book, Russ Stutler (sp?) did an on-line article about the company. Somehow, that information grabbed my attention and intrigued me. The pens looked lovely and seemed to be large, useful works of art. I have wanted a Hakasa pen since. So, in some way, I feel I can relate to the impulse that motivated you.

I love buffalo horn as a pen material, though I have only two of my own - both Danis. The horn has a marvelouely tactile feel that I enjoy. The design of your pen is unique and minimalist, which I love. That Zen-like design is something the Japanese excell at and is a feature I cherish in their pens.

Thanks also for the comparison photos. I find them helpful.

So now, I go to drum my fingers on the desk and contemplate a Hakasa pen of my own. Maybe if I wait until the end of October, I can have the Hakasa in November 2010 for my birthday.

#7 Inka

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 19:01

Now wishing I knew how to read Japanese, so I could make out the paperwork.
Hopefully someone will come along soon that can translate for us; now I'm curious.
“I view my fountain pens & inks as an artist might view their brushes and paints.
They flow across paper as a brush to canvas, transforming my thoughts into words and my words into art.
There is nothing else like it; the art of writing and the painting of words!”

~Inka~ [Scott]; 5 October, 2009

#8 enricof

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 19:06

notworthy1.gif puddle.gif

Not to nose in your business, but any indication of the price level?

"not cheap" is a bit vague...

Enrico

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#9 rhk

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 19:51

QUOTE (enricof @ May 17 2009, 08:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
notworthy1.gif puddle.gif

Not to nose in your business, but any indication of the price level?

"not cheap" is a bit vague...

Enrico



Slightly less than a POA pen, but I prefer to forget such things. Ruud

#10 rhk

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 19:56

QUOTE (Nikolaos @ May 17 2009, 05:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
By the way, are the trays you display the pens in Romero Llopis ? I recently bought a 36 pen Romero Llopis display from P.W. Akkerman and the trays look very similar to yours.


I have two Romero Llopis pen cases, one with two trays with six pens each, and one with two trays of twelve pens each. This is it. My total collection will not exceed 36 pens plus a few that don't fit in the trays (for example, Nakaya long models). At this moment, they are filled, so when my next pen is arriving, I will have to let go of one. The first on the block will be the Visconti Wall Street LE in green. Ruud

#11 Inka

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 20:58

I was able to "roughly" translate the Hakase Homepage [and Links, I believe will now translate somewhat as well now] from Japanese into English: could do the same with the paperwork if I had imaging software [but unfortunately I do not]:

News

- Finished circumstance of fountain pen
Merely, now, 2011/2011 3 end of the month day it is finished and (approximately 23 months to wait) with has ordered.
- The news which goes to bed
20 (the water) 27 (the water) the day off you can point May
June July August every week the day off can point to Wednesday


- The third generation model which is announced in the ●2008 year 14th exchange program, viewing.

- The instrument lathe of 甦 [ru] Taisho and Showa, the scraper and the paragraph oven, the lathe of today finally completion. 3/31 renewals.


- The walking of fountain pen doctor was published

- As for requesting information materials and order of ink from this

Last date updated: 2009/05/17


Furthermore I saw the order form and they're made-to-order pens, varying cost.
As you can see in the first paragraph, when translated into English, there is @ a 23 month turn-around on average for these pens.

Seems to me it's one of those things whereby "If you have to ask how much, you probably cannot afford one anyway." type of items.

For anyone willing to save to get one, willing to wait for it to be made it's a near priceless work or "working art" and a dream-come-true situation for the owner.

I'm just proud to know someone here has one, is willing to share their dream with me, and for that alone I am very grateful. Thank you for sharing; it's an honor to see your dream realized.

EDIT: Added the phrase "and Links, I believe will now translate somewhat as well now" to original post.
I hope it all translates for you now.

Edited by Inka, 17 May 2009 - 21:02.

“I view my fountain pens & inks as an artist might view their brushes and paints.
They flow across paper as a brush to canvas, transforming my thoughts into words and my words into art.
There is nothing else like it; the art of writing and the painting of words!”

~Inka~ [Scott]; 5 October, 2009

#12 troglokev

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 21:06

Thanks for a nicely done review of an unusual pen, Ruud.

The instruction page looks like a generic insert. The first two highlighted points are telling you to use standard pilot cartridges, and that it takes the Pilot CON70 and CON50 converters. The other two are talking about black water buffalo, and black ebonite, but the smaller text is not very legible. If you can send me a higher resolution scan of the insert, I'll translate it for you. The kanji are hard to make out at this resolution.

I'm reasonably sure that I can do better than Inka's machine translation software!

Edited by troglokev, 17 May 2009 - 22:11.


#13 rhk

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 06:42

QUOTE (troglokev @ May 17 2009, 09:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for a nicely done review of an unusual pen, Ruud.

The instruction page looks like a generic insert. The first two highlighted points are telling you to use standard pilot cartridges, and that it takes the Pilot CON70 and CON50 converters. The other two are talking about black water buffalo, and black ebonite, but the smaller text is not very legible. If you can send me a higher resolution scan of the insert, I'll translate it for you. The kanji are hard to make out at this resolution.

I'm reasonably sure that I can do better than Inka's machine translation software!

Yhank you very much for your reaction. I have put higher resolution scans as page 1 and page 2. Ruud

#14 troglokev

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 08:30

Page 1

スペアー式 - パイロットシングルスペアー(IRF-12)を使用下さい
Cartridge - Please use the Pilot cartridge (IRF-12)

吸入式 - パイロットコンバーター70
パイロットコンバーター50
Converter - Pilot CON70
Pilot CON50

1. 図のように垂直にインクに首軸先端部分まで入れてください
2. *この状態でノブを強めに5〜6回押すと、インクタンクがいっぱいになります。(コンバーター70)
*この状態でノブを時計回りに回してインクを吸入してください。(コンバーター50)
3. ペン先や首軸についあたインクはティッシュあるいは布などよく拭き取るご使用下さい。

1. Holding vertically as shown in the diagram, insert the pen into the ink up to the tip of the section.
2. If you press the button 5-6 times the ink tank will fill. (CON-70)
Please turn the knob clockwise to take in ink (CON-50)
3. If there is ink remaining on the nib or section, please thoroughly wipe with a tissue or soft cloth.

<<万年筆のお手入れの仕方>>
Maintenance instructions

万年筆は毎日、少しでも使うのが理想です。カップを閉めた状態で使わなくても、インクの水分が少しづつ蒸発しますので、書き出しがかすれたり書けなかったりします。症状によっては次のように手入れをしてください。
A fountain pen should be used for a little bit each day. If the pen is left unused, even though it is capped it will still lose some water from the ink through evaporation, and become dried out and start to skip or stop writing completely. If this happens, try the following.

1.インクがかすれて文字が切れる
ペン先を水につけ、あとティシュペーパーでぬぐってください。
If the ink is dry and the pen skips
Soak the nib in water then wipe with a tissue paper.

2.ほとんど書けない
コンバーターを着け、インクを吸入の要領で水(水道水乃冷たい水)を繰り返し吸入、脱水して下さい。あるいは図2のように、ペン先、首軸をコップの水につけて下さい。
If it is not writing at all
With the converter attached, use the method above to suck water into the pen and expel several times (clean cold tap water). Alternatively, as shown in figure 2, soak the nib and section in a cup of cold water.

Page 2

お客様の満足がHAKASEの生命です。
手作りオーダー万年筆は、お客様の個々の書きぐせに合わせてペン先を磨きあげ,昔ながらロクロで一本一本心をこめてお好みの形に仕上げました。万一不備な点、少しでも気になることがございましたら、いつでもお申し付けください。

Customer satisfaction is HAKASE’s life.
We offer a handmade to order fountain pen, with a nib ground to the customer’s individual writing style, long ages spent at the lathe to make each pen to the customer’s liking. If there is even the tiniest thing that isn’t perfect, we are always at your service to fix it.

(or something like that: it gets a bit flowery, there!)

本べっ甲
南海を回遊するタイマイ(海亀)の甲羅から採る天然べっ甲は独特色柄が美しく、手触りはしっとりとした柔らかさがあります。

Real tortoiseshell
Natural tortoiseshell taken from from the TAIMAI, a migratory turtle from the south sea, has unique colouring and patterning, and a velvety softness to the touch.

ココボロウッド
サウスアメリカンロセウッドとも呼ばれ、淡黄色から濃赤色まで、黒色の縞模様が混じって使い込む艶やかな濃い色に変色します。

Cocobola wood
Also called South American rosewood, its colour ranges from pale yellow to deep red, mingled with a black striped pattern, the colour darkens with use to a deep glossy finish.

水牛製
熱帯に棲むウォーターバッファローの角は、しっとりとしたぬくもりのある肌ざわりが特徴です。亀甲、象牙、木製品がそうであるように、温度の影響を受けて、膨張、収縮をする性質があります。いわゆる生き物です。このような欠点をカバーするために、筆記具に使用する場合ネジあわせの部分カップとボディーのかんごう部分は、エボナイトで補強しております.

The horn of the tropical waterbuffalo’s particular characteristic is its warmth and smoothness. Like tortoiseshell, ivory and wooden products, it is affected by heat, and will expand and contract. It is a so-called living thing. To cover for this problem, when used for writing instruments, the area near the thread between cap and body is reinforced with ebonite.

オランダ水牛
オランダ水牛は半透明のアメ色に濃茶のたて縞が、またはアイボリー色に黒のたて縞が美しく、その紋様は二つとない個性を表現します。

Dutch waterbuffalo has translucent rain-colour to deep tea coloured mottled shading or otherwise ivory coloured to black shading, that kind of pattern expresses two beautiful characters.

黒水牛
黒水牛はほかのアクセサリーなどの細工物は生地に染色して、真っ黒に仕上げますが、当社では生地のまま黒地に渦状縞を生かして仕上げます。

Black waterbuffalo is used for accessories and the like, and the natural black often dyed, to give a pitch black finish, but our company keeps uses a finish that keeps the natural black [shading?] alive.

生ゴムに硫黄を加えて作られる硬質ゴム系の素材で、すべりにくく手にやさしい特徴です。毎日のように使う手の脂で鈍い光沢が出ます。逆に使い方が少ないと艶が失せ、ネズミ色してしまうが欠点です。
Ebonite is hard rubber made by adding sulphur to natural rubber, and has a characteristic warmth and good feeling in the hand. Used every day, it develops a gloss from skin oils. However, its problem is that if used infrequently, it loses its gloss and develops a grey colour.

ブラックエボナイト
黒々とした光沢を維持するには毎日でも使い、眼鏡用のクロス手入れます。

Black Ebonite
To keep the black gloss, use daily, and maintain using an eyeglass cleaning cloth.

レッドマーブル
赤茶色のマーブル模様が美しき人気があります。
ブルーマーブル
青緑色のマーブル模様のエボナイトは稀少です。

Red Marble
The red and brown marble pattern is beautiful, and is very popular.
Blue Marble
Blue and green marbled ebonite is scarce.

セルロイド
NJGニュージェードグリーン
JGジェードグリーン
LBラピスラズリブルー
RRリップルレッド

Celluloid
NJG New Jade Green
JG Jade Green
LB Lapis Lazuli Blue
RR Ripple Red

原料は綿花の花芯(コットンリンター)。発色が鮮やかで質感のある色柄が楽しめます。
The raw material is cotton. The colours are vivid, with an enjoyable texture and pattern.

Edited by troglokev, 18 May 2009 - 21:27.


#15 FrankB

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 09:54

troglokev wrote:

"Cocobola wood
Also called South American rosewood, its colour ranges from pale yellow to deep red, mingled with a black striped pattern, the colour darkens with use to a deep glossy finish."


puddle.gif Oh, drool! puddle.gif

#16 rhk

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 10:38

QUOTE (FrankB @ May 18 2009, 10:54 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
troglokev wrote:

"Cocobola wood
Also called South American rosewood, its colour ranges from pale yellow to deep red, mingled with a black striped pattern, the colour darkens with use to a deep glossy finish."


puddle.gif Oh, drool! puddle.gif


That is my other Hakase, model #2009, the one behind.





#17 Inka

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 12:43

QUOTE (troglokev @ May 17 2009, 05:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
...I'm reasonably sure that I can do better than Inka's machine translation software!

I was hoping someone would do so.
Great job, from what I can tell [not able to read it myself]; always nice to see true translations and not software generated.
Thanks.
thumbup.gif
“I view my fountain pens & inks as an artist might view their brushes and paints.
They flow across paper as a brush to canvas, transforming my thoughts into words and my words into art.
There is nothing else like it; the art of writing and the painting of words!”

~Inka~ [Scott]; 5 October, 2009

#18 troglokev

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 12:54

QUOTE (Inka @ May 18 2009, 10:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (troglokev @ May 17 2009, 05:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
...I'm reasonably sure that I can do better than Inka's machine translation software!

I was hoping someone would do so.
Great job, from what I can tell [not able to read it myself]; always nice to see true translations and not software generated.
Thanks.
thumbup.gif

It would be fun to see what the machine translation comes up with for some of that, now that you've got a transcription!
tongue.gif

#19 greencobra

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 14:25

Nice! All I can say right now. No, really super nice! Anything like this from Japan knocks me out. And how about the care involved with the instruction sheet. They do it right. Love the look of that pen and so glad you shared this with us. Up until now I wasn't aware of Hakase. embarrassed_smile.gif


JELL-O, IT'S WHATS FOR DINNER!

#20 rhk

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 17:38

QUOTE (hari317 @ May 17 2009, 04:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thank you Ruud, I was looking forward to this review. It is truly a very rare pen with an unusual design and your documentation of it is much appreciated. From the photos it looks like the section is also made from buffalo horn and the feeder used is different from the usual Pilot plastic feeders. Would it be possible to take a closeup shot of the nib showing the engraving?

Warm Regards,
Hari


Here are pictures of the nib and the feed. The dirty spots on the nib are ink. Ruud













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