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Walker Davison Eyedropper

anything about this maker?

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11 replies to this topic

#1 Pickwick

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 14:45

I have just acquired this ebonite eyedropper and restored it. The nib is marked: Walker Davison and Co Mansfield. There is no maker information on the barrel. The nib is a fine one and no flex to it. Researching the web I did find a listing For Walker Davison Mansfield Illinois, but no information whether the company made fountain pens

 

Researching FPN I found a mention of this maker but no history.

 

Anyone who has knowledge about the origins of this company would be much appreciated.


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


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#2 Roger W.

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 18:00

I've found a Massachusetts company incorporated in 1917 by that name in Mansfield, MA.  Does the pen say it is Illinois (which does also have a Mansfield)?

 

Roger W. 



#3 Pickwick

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 18:56

I've found a Massachusetts company incorporated in 1917 by that name in Mansfield, MA.  Does the pen say it is Illinois (which does also have a Mansfield)?

 

Roger W. 

Thanks for your reply. The only engraving is on the nib, and doesn't give the state There is nothing on the barrel at all. Was  the company you found in MA making pens?

 

Appreciated your research.


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#4 Roger W.

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 20:21

Thanks for your reply. The only engraving is on the nib, and doesn't give the state There is nothing on the barrel at all. Was  the company you found in MA making pens?

 

Appreciated your research.

Well, they could have been making pens - just said they were incorporated and some basic financials.  Though a company of that name and in the right town circa 1917 would be good for eyedroppers.

 

AHA!  OK, found 'em.  Bankruptcy 1920 reported in the Jewelers Circular May 5, 1920.  Maker of gold pens (means nibs so they must have been known for nibs primarily and not pens).  So if they incorporated in 1917 and the bankruptcy case was being reopened in 1920 they were very short lived.

 

Roger W.



#5 Pickwick

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 00:40

Many thanks Roger W.This is a well made pen, but it looks as though being short lived they were trying to compete with the major manufacturers who by then were well established in the business.

They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#6 Jeff L

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 01:37

Walker Davison is believed to be related to Paul Johnson of the Bay State Gold Pen Company of Mansfield, which also sold pens under Bay State Pen.

 

Bay State Gold Pen Co made nibs for many of the northeast companies like DeWitt-LaFrance.  Some Walker Davison have DeWitt-LaFrance parts.  Paul Johnson also used DeWitt-LaFrance for Bay State Pen.

 

As DeWitt-LaFrance made parts for Carter, Walker Davison and Bay State Pen are of interest to Carter collectors.



#7 Pickwick

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 02:30

Walker Davison is believed to be related to Paul Johnson of the Bay State Gold Pen Company of Mansfield, which also sold pens under Bay State Pen.

 

Bay State Gold Pen Co made nibs for many of the northeast companies like DeWitt-LaFrance.  Some Walker Davison have DeWitt-LaFrance parts.  Paul Johnson also used DeWitt-LaFrance for Bay State Pen.

 

As DeWitt-LaFrance made parts for Carter, Walker Davison and Bay State Pen are of interest to Carter collectors.

Thanks Jeff L for adding another piece of useful information. It's Appreciated very much. I've been collecting these types of fountain pens over the past couple of months. 


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#8 rhr

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 06:34

Walker Davison and Co., later Walker & Davison, was actually a co-partnership between John T. Davison and a guy named Walker, who I haven't been able to identify by given name, yet. Roger, does his name appear on the bankruptcy report? Their business started in the 1890s, and as Jeff said, they got their gold nibs from Bay State Gold Pen Co. before they started making their own, and De Witt-La France made their pen parts for them. Davison received a patent in 1905 for a button filler, the patent that was purchased by Parker and used on their Jack Knife Lucky Curve and Duofold pens. Davison's patent lists his address in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1905, so the company must have moved to Mansfield, Mass., at a later date, perhaps to be closer to their sources of production.

George Kovalenko.

:ninja:

Edited by rhr, 14 August 2013 - 06:43.

rhrpen(at)gmail.com


#9 Pickwick

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 13:34

Walker Davison and Co., later Walker & Davison, was actually a co-partnership between John T. Davison and a guy named Walker, who I haven't been able to identify by given name, yet. Roger, does his name appear on the bankruptcy report? Their business started in the 1890s, and as Jeff said, they got their gold nibs from Bay State Gold Pen Co. before they started making their own, and De Witt-La France made their pen parts for them. Davison received a patent in 1905 for a button filler, the patent that was purchased by Parker and used on their Jack Knife Lucky Curve and Duofold pens. Davison's patent lists his address in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1905, so the company must have moved to Mansfield, Mass., at a later date, perhaps to be closer to their sources of production.

George Kovalenko.

:ninja:

Many thanks for your further research which helps in identifying this pen's makers.


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#10 Roger W.

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 16:52

Walker Davison and Co., later Walker & Davison, was actually a co-partnership between John T. Davison and a guy named Walker, who I haven't been able to identify by given name, yet. Roger, does his name appear on the bankruptcy report? Their business started in the 1890s, and as Jeff said, they got their gold nibs from Bay State Gold Pen Co. before they started making their own, and De Witt-La France made their pen parts for them. Davison received a patent in 1905 for a button filler, the patent that was purchased by Parker and used on their Jack Knife Lucky Curve and Duofold pens. Davison's patent lists his address in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1905, so the company must have moved to Mansfield, Mass., at a later date, perhaps to be closer to their sources of production.

George Kovalenko.

:ninja:

George;

 

The short bit I gave is what I got - the listing in the Jeweler's Circular not the report itself.  I'm glad this topic got more replies as it looked the type to be DOA (Dead on Arrival) but, with the Carter tie in Pickwick got some good info.

 

Roger W.



#11 Pickwick

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 01:37

Roger W, Jeff L and rhr, Your researches have been very valuable in putting this jigsaw puzzle together. Your research is much appreciated.

Many thanks

They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#12 Richard

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 02:26

Walker Davison and Co., later Walker & Davison, was actually a co-partnership between John T. Davison and a guy named Walker, who I haven't been able to identify by given name, yet.

 

The guy in question was Philip S. Walker, who served as treasurer of the company and was listed among the individuals in debt when the company filed for bankruptcy on September 15, 1917, less than two years after they were incorporated on January 24, 1916.


Edited by Richard, 24 February 2014 - 02:27.

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