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Parker Pen Hallmark Listing for Precious Metal Pens!


DocNib
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Hope this will help some of you who want to know what those little indentations and stamp marks are on your precious metal Parker pens. I had customers back in the 80's who thought that these were defects or dents in pens such as the '75' and the Premier. A 10X to 22X loupe should do the trick in ascertaining what the symbol is, then compare it to the list...

 

Hallmark List from the mid-1980's...

http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p113/DocNib2006/DocNib%20Pics%201001-2000/scan.jpg

 

ENJOY!

Docnib

PS--I had a Pelikan nib the other day with 2nd symbol under 18CT Gold (French Assay Office)...curious!

Edited by DocNib
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  • 13 years later...
On 7/21/2008 at 8:00 AM, DocNib said:

Hope this will help some of you who want to know what those little indentations and stamp marks are on your precious metal Parker pens. I had customers back in the 80's who thought that these were defects or dents in pens such as the '75' and the Premier. A 10X to 22X loupe should do the trick in ascertaining what the symbol is, then compare it to the list...

 

Hallmark List from the mid-1980's...

http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p113/DocNib2006/DocNib%20Pics%201001-2000/scan.jpg

 

ENJOY!

Docnib

PS--I had a Pelikan nib the other day with 2nd symbol under 18CT Gold (French Assay Office)...curious!

 

This link no longer works (thanks, Photobucket). Can you re-post somewhere else and give us a new link? Thanks. 

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I think there's also an article about various precious metal hallmarks for Parkers on www.parkercollector.com.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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  • 11 months later...

Hmm - just picked up a Sonnet missing its cap band, which has a rather lovely 18 k nib with a 750 hallmark and a sideways diamond bisected on long axis with a PW. 

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I was thinking of asking this too.

 Made in France Premier with American Maker's Mark.

 The French 180 has the same example.

 

Does it mean that only the nib is made in U.S.A.?

 

https://parkerpens.net/codekey.html

 

large.2043050056_Screenshot_20220716-1853422.png.8dd0e457ea69cca9c73b1db4e97addae.png

*The date of the pen is unknown because the image is quoted from the internet.

 

Edited by Number99
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The diamond with an arrow and "P P" is Parker Pen's "house mark".  It's a maker's mark, rather than a gold content mark.  They used the diamond mark in other countries; by the time this nib was made, makers marks weren't strictly regulated at all.  Also, when this nib was made, it could arguably have been made under Parker USA's umbrella.

 

This nib was made in France; in addition to the wordmark "France", there's a French eagle's head gold content mark to the left of the wordmark; it signifies .750 gold content, or 18kt.

 

-- Joel -- "I collect expensive and time-consuming hobbies."

 

INK (noun): A villainous compound of tannogallate of iron, gum-arabic and water,

chiefly used to facilitate the infection of idiocy and promote intellectual crime.

(from The Devil's Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce)

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1 hour ago, Kalessin said:

The diamond with an arrow and "P P" is Parker Pen's "house mark".  It's a maker's mark, rather than a gold content mark.  They used the diamond mark in other countries; by the time this nib was made, makers marks weren't strictly regulated at all.  Also, when this nib was made, it could arguably have been made under Parker USA's umbrella.

 

This nib was made in France; in addition to the wordmark "France", there's a French eagle's head gold content mark to the left of the wordmark; it signifies .750 gold content, or 18kt.

 

Thank you.

 My question is solved.

 

 I may still be wrong.

 I understand that by adding the Parker U.S.A. house mark to the French hallmark, it expresses that it meets the gold standards of both France and the United States, as well as the manufacturing standards of the maker.

 

Edited by Number99
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16 minutes ago, Number99 said:

I understand that by adding the Parker U.S.A. housemark to the French hallmark, it expresses that it meets the gold standards of both France and the United States.

 

No, the presence of this maker's mark has zero significance on whether the item with this mark meets a gold standard or not. Parker has used these marks in various designs since more than 70 years and they can be found on solid gold parts (next to a gold content hallmark such as the nib shown above) but also on non solid gold parts (in the absence of a gold content hallmark such as on gold filled caps).

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4 hours ago, joss said:

 

No, the presence of this maker's mark has zero significance on whether the item with this mark meets a gold standard or not. Parker has used these marks in various designs since more than 70 years and they can be found on solid gold parts (next to a gold content hallmark such as the nib shown above) but also on non solid gold parts (in the absence of a gold content hallmark such as on gold filled caps).

Thankyou.

 

 I'm sorry, I entered "gold" instead of "precious metal"... (in Japanese before conversion...It's not Google-san's fault, it's me)

 I knew that it was also used for silver-plated products.

 I thought that the Maker's Mark corresponds to the workshop mark for precious metal products, but I was wrong.

 

However, I am glad to know that the French 180 section/nib unit stamped only with the American Maker's Mark and 750m is not Franken pen.(585m is stamped with the French Maker's Mark)

 

 

 

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