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Re-Corking a Waterman Safety



Dennis B
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RussA requested I post my experience re-corking a Waterman Safety, so here it is.

 

First, the disassembled pen -

 

http://www.parkvillepen.com/images/waterman/w42parts.jpg

 

The first part is easy - like removeing a section. Heat the end and unscrew the end piece. Then you can pull out the spiral pin crossbar and remove the nib/feed from the spiral.

 

Scary part next. Again warming up the end piece, knock the spiral shaft out. Do not punch on the small circle, just the larger one. The small circle is the shaft lock pin. Once that is out, the fun of making a new cork seal begins.

 

This time I used a section of cork from a wine bottle cork. Much denser than the cork sheet I used for the Waterman. Punching out the piece of cork and turning to size is next. I use a Dremel type tool for turning down the cork.

 

The hardest part of all is making the center hole for the shaft. I had at least five failures here before I got one done using gradually larger drill bits to enlarge the hole for a snug fit.

 

Reassemble in reverse order. The hardest chore for me was getting the shaft lock pin pack in place. Mostly due to bad eyeseight and fumble fingers.

 

Just go slow and don't rush yourself if you try this. Also, do not lose any of the small parts.

 

Right now my pen has Waterman Florida Blue in it and is sitting nib up in a cup on a paper towel to check for leaks.

 

I'm not even sure what model this is as the imprint is worn off the end. The nib is a #2 and I'm guessing this is a 42V from its length.

 

Dennis B.

Fools rush in where ...

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Thanks for the exploded view Dennis. There are considerably more pieces to the Waterman when compared to a Moore's. Is it correct that the cork goes into the barrel, then the end piece/section srews down against the cork? Also, is the shaft larger than that of the Moore's, because that would make it harder to drill out without breaking up the cork?

 

For me, seeing something apart is worth a thousand words worth of directions in a repair manual. Thanks.

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Russ,

 

Yep more pieces to break or lose.

 

The cork goes into the end piece (the threaded piece that screws into the barrel) and then the turning knob goes in. The spiral shaft fits into the turning knob and is held in place with the locking pin.

 

Look at the end of a Waterman Safety. The larger circle is the end of the spiral shaft. The smaller offset circle is the locking pin.

 

The shaft is larger than the Moore's which requires a larger hole through the center. Took several attempts to make a cork that would work. Getting the turning knob back on the shaft with the locking pin was a bit tricky for me.

 

Always seems like a good idea to take a pic of all the parts while the pen is apart. Hope it helps if you decide to try one.

 

Cheers,

 

Dennis

 

PS, so far, so good on my seal. I've used the pen ans experienced no leaks (yet!)

:)

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Russ, Roger, Antonios,

 

Thanks! But don't hold your breath waiting for me to go into the repair business. I really wouldn't want to take the chance of breaking someone else's pen. Mine, well I can live with that, but not yours. :(

 

Antonios, go ahead and tackle the job yourself. I've shown that even the inept can do it with time and patience. What Safety do you have?

 

Bringing them back to life is part of the fun.

 

Dennis B

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I have this baby. It is an italian overlay - I am not sure of the terminology.

The cap is imprinted Waterman's 18K R. and the button says 42.

It has an ultra-noodle for nib - but unfortunately it has to be retipped also.

 

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/azavalia/W42it.jpg

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