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How do you keep track of ink in pens?


Claes

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One of my nightmares would be if I happened

to empty a pen into the wrong ink bottle...

 

How do you keep track on what ink is in what pen?

Since I presently am in an experimental mood (i.e.

changing ink quite often), I keep track in a LibreOffice

Calc sheet.

 

Have fun!
Claes in Lund, Sweden

 

 

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I keep a text file that's a log of everything about every pen I own. I know when I bought it, where and everything that happened to it and when. It's a long list, but it's searchable.

 

But, I also have a notebook titled Currently Inked. Cos it's visual. I cross out the entry when the pen gets cleaned.

 

large.currently_inked.jpg.f7e482b4b2e9839547e3e0d2c8ba7076.jpg

Will work for pens... :unsure:

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I have a special TN insert for that purpose. 
I write with the certain phrasings I use in different languages, the inked pen and the ink.
I also have a small note book made with left over smaller pieces of Iroful or Yusari paper. I use those notebooks to test out ink when I inked it . 
I am one of those people who inked a lot of pens at the same time, so a notebook to keep record is essential to me .

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I keep a very extensive google sheet.  It contains all of my inks (I’m a hoarder sadly) and all of my pens (not as big of a hoarder) and exactly what ink I have in each pen and when and how much I filled it with.  It’s part of a personal goal to begin using more inks, which I did in 23 compared with 22.  But it’s a far shot from putting a dent in my collection.  

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Labels. On the converter, or the barrel if it's not a converter-filled model.

large.AsvineP30EFnibwritingsampleinHerbinCacaoduBresil.jpg.cd53a8ac02a3ea8ab98bad447dfa2de8.jpg large.873458366_HowthenibsonthePlatinumBalanceandthePreppydifferapparently.jpg.0649ff8ed47c3b773f7eafe6403bfaef.jpg spacer.png

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct, and valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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I'm old and forgetful, I use a notebook that I keep next to my "inking station" and write pen and ink in there as soon as I fill a new pen. It also helps as visual reference for inks, and pen/ink coupling that work the best.

 

There's also Fountainpencompanion that can be useful to track inks, pens, currently filled, and track usage records if you're into that.

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Like others have mentioned, I keep an ink journal in a notebook. In my case, an A5 size book from Galen Leather with the old Tomoe River paper in it, and I use a shadow form behind the pages that has places to write the pen info, the name of the ink, the date loaded (and eventually the date the ink ran out) and a small swatch. This form has "Inkdex currently inked pens" on it, but I don't remember where I got it, and googling that doesn't seem very useful. 

 

I don't, as a rule, empty ink back into the bottle unless it turns out there is something wrong with a pen and I have to fix it before I can write. At the start of every day's journal entry, I write the pen and the ink that I'm using that day, and I use this notebook to remind me what's in the pen. I usually have a dozen inked pens in rotation, so it's hard for me to remember. 

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I keep a notebook, which I update whenever I ink or clean a pen. I keep the same info on a spreadsheet (less the writing sample, of course) with a quick note about the ink+pen combo. 

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Easy, I never have that many pens inked. Even when I'm testing a lot of pens, they almost always have a predictable ink in them, but "a lot" of pens inked at the same time for me means something like 5 or 6 pens. It's more likely that I'll have only 2 pens or so inked at any given time. 

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I have a file on my computer, listing the pens I own by brand.  Pens that are currently inked up get highlighted by changing the text from black to a bright color, and listing what the ink is.  When the pen gets flushed out, the ink name/color gets deleted and the the text is changed back to black until the next time that pen is inked up.  I also make notes (in a different color) if the pen needs to be flushed out soon.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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I use a pile of notecards, but why I don’t switch to one of MANY blank notebooks I have laying around is beyond me. I will rectify this tomorrow!

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23 hours ago, Claes said:

One of my nightmares would be if I happened

to empty a pen into the wrong ink bottle...

Yes!

And no!

As long as the ink in the bottle doesn't precipitate or form a gel, not much damage was done.

If you spoil, let's say 0.25 mL of residual ink from the pen into a half full bottle with 20 mL, the resulting mixed colour may be different from the original if you see the lines side by side, but will not be seen when on paper without any reference.

Don't worry too much! ;) 

 

23 hours ago, Claes said:

How do you keep track on what ink is in what pen?

I have a maximum of 4 pens filled at a time and keep them for 1 month. The pens are in a tray and the ink bottles are in another tray beside it. That way it's hard to mismatch something (but not impossible :) ).

Although, surprisingly interesting colours have been found in the past from such mixing by chance! :rolleyes:

One life!

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Libreoffice Calc too...

 

 

Encres stylos 1.png

"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

 

B. Russell

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I have Leuchtturm and Clairefontaine notebooks that I write the pen and ink names in.  Leuchtturm paper is ivory, and Clairefontaine has white paper. I like to see inks on both. The Leuchtturm gets longer writing since it has more pages. I got a third notebook, a Mnemosyne notebook that I write in for longer use or to post images here. When it’s done, I might will use a blank pages Leuchtturm notebook. 
 

I never empty the ink back in the bottle from a pen I’ve been using. I either write it dry, or empty it in the sink. 

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I have an ink inventory spreadsheet with a row for each ink (but not a pen inventory spreadsheet, which should perhaps tell you something) with a column for the pens that are inked with the ink in the corresponding row. Also a separate sheet for ink mixes. I also put a hang tag on the clip of each pen that is inked, with a notation with the ink name, written in that ink, and a scribble swatch (and sometimes also the nib type for pens I have multiples of, e.g. vintage Pilot Elites and Supers). I used to use adhesive labels but got tired of the removing the remaining adhesive from the pens and worried a little about the damage the adhesive might cause.

 

I do also inventory my inks on fountainpencompanion.com but I found it a bit too cumbersome to track my inked pens with it. I think the spreadsheet affords easier access to all the information I am interested in. 

 

It is very, very rare that I empty a pen back into an ink bottle. Since I am never sure if a new ink-pen combination will be a good match, I almost always first do a test run with about a half to a third full filler, converter, or refilled cartridge so there is little waste if there is not a good match. And, even then, unless I find a great match with an ink I love, I rarely do a full fill anyway since I like to change inks a lot.

My pens for sale: https://www.facebook.com/jaiyen.pens  

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I have a gray plastic index card box...pens are listed in alphabetical order, current ink under that.....of course it helps to have it very close to hand...a yard away may be too far....in often I find out I never made a card for a pen.:wallbash:

In reference to P. T. Barnum; to advise for free is foolish, ........busybodies are ill liked by both factions.

 

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Simple. A notebook. I write the following information 

 

Ink name

Pen (including nib size)

Some scribbles and date inked. 

 

Even with 8-12 pens inked, I never have to go back more than a couple of pages.

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Brad

"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain

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