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Antique Store Find! Pilot...something. Help me identify it.


Emc^2

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Hi all!

 

I just bought a Pilot celluloid pen at a local antique store and I can't find anything on it. I know it's a Pilot and that it's old. I am confused on the filling mechanism (solved), and would like to find out the model #/name and history of the pen.

 

UPDATE: The filling mechanism is a Japanese Eyedropper with a closing valve. I still would like to find out the model #/name and history on it.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.603298b9fa83997a3c4c961153669aaf.jpeg

image.thumb.jpeg.5842fcd1146ec1a0954b645dfe113ab2.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.1795578ca96f1765cb44eddf6fc78c83.jpeg

 

Edited by Emc^2
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After asking around some more in different places, I am 99% sure this a "Japanese Eyedropper" pen. You fully close it when you are not using it to prevent "burping" and then when you want to use it, you open the valve a bit. 

 

Still wondering if anyone knows the style number or name of the model?

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Yes, it looks an eyedropper with a shutoff valve. I don't know much about these early Pilot models but, given the way the clip is attached to the cap, I believe it is previous to the 53R (1953). A steel nib might indicate a WWII-era pen, not sure. The nib might be flexy but you'll need to repair that tine gap. It's very likely ink will leak where the shutoff valve rod enters the barrel and it will need new seals.

 

Hopefully someone with expertise will chime in.

My pens for sale: https://www.facebook.com/jaiyen.pens  

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Interesting.  A couple of weekends ago I picked up several pens at an estate sale, including an unknown to me brand called Elliott.  When I did a quick online search, it turns out to be a Japanese brand.  Seeing this thread is now making me wonder if it's got a similar type of fill system (I had originally presumed that it was like that of old Sheaffer vacuum fillers).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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On 9/10/2023 at 7:57 AM, PithyProlix said:

Yes, it looks an eyedropper with a shutoff valve. I don't know much about these early Pilot models but, given the way the clip is attached to the cap, I believe it is previous to the 53R (1953). A steel nib might indicate a WWII-era pen, not sure. The nib might be flexy but you'll need to repair that tine gap. It's very likely ink will leak where the shutoff valve rod enters the barrel and it will need new seals.

 

Hopefully someone with expertise will chime in.

 

Great, thanks for the information. I will take a closer look at the tines! It writes beautifully.

 

On 9/10/2023 at 11:29 AM, inkstainedruth said:

Interesting.  A couple of weekends ago I picked up several pens at an estate sale, including an unknown to me brand called Elliott.  When I did a quick online search, it turns out to be a Japanese brand.  Seeing this thread is now making me wonder if it's got a similar type of fill system (I had originally presumed that it was like that of old Sheaffer vacuum fillers).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

This was a new style for me as well. Originally I thought it was some sort of vac pen, so I bought knowing that I may have a learning curve ahead of me, but I have been pleasantly surprised that it was not the case. It's a great pen and writes like a dream. Super flexy, smooth nib, a true gem of a find.

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Good to know.

For three bucks, I was willing to take a risk.  Of course one of the other pens turned out to have a major crack in the cap, which I didn't notice until I got home.  But, also three bucks.  Forget what that brand was, Windsor, I think -- sort of a pretty material.  The best of the bunch was what I thought (from the listing photo) was going to be a Parkette (I have one that looks to be the same material for the barrel and cap), only to discover when I got in the door that it was a "Deluxe Challenger" button filler. B)

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

ETA: Forget what the fourth one, a lever filler like the Windsor, was.  But 4 FPs for 3 bucks apiece?  Sure!  Just hope they write well (they all looked as if they might have EF nibs on them... :wacko:).

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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The identification of 53R, 49R, and earlier R-type fountain pens seems to be done mainly by the presence or absence of an inner cap, the pattern of engraving on the barrel, the shape around the clip attachment area, and the date of the nib, and further by examining whether the characteristics of each part are consistent.

The 49R and 53R can be interpreted as common names, as we have information that these are Pilot's internal codes and not model names.

 

I could say something about the pen, but I won't because I am not familiar with it and I think it would be irresponsible for me to refer to it based on an image with inappropriate angles and significant blurriness.

 

I think the best way to be sure is to do your own research based on a reliable image of the pen at hand. There are blogs by three experts and enthusiasts who study these pen species.

But they are vast articles in Japanese.

I can PM you the links if you wish.

 

Supplemental Explanation: 

•These classifications are probably the result of research by Japanese enthusiasts. I have not seen any article describing this, showing catalogs.

•The JIS law was established in 1949. I don't know when Pilot adopted JIS, as there are various theories, and the 53R includes some without the JIS mark.

•1953 from which point the ban on the use of gold nibs was lifted.

•With so many damaged pens on the market, it is not surprising that parts have been replaced.

 

Correction to add.

JIS for fountain pens started in 1949 as JIS S 6616, and JIS for nibs started in 1961 as JIS S 6025.

These were later unified as JIS S 6025 : 2002.

Therefore, it is necessary to verify when the JIS mark was first stamped on the nib.

Regarding my statement above, it cannot be said that *fountain pens are not JIS certified because there is no JIS mark on the nib.

 

*JIS-acquired fountain pens manufactured in the early period between 1949 and 1960.

Edited by Number99
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