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Lamy 2000, Is it worth it?


Nhartist40

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I finally bought a Lamy 2000 medium.  I was never that huge fan of the Lamy Safari, but recently I found that a Safari with a medium nib, instead of a fine nib writes nicely.  I got a good deal on a Lamy 2000 and took the plunge and now I get what all the fuss is about.  The nib writes beautifully.  It is smooth with just the right amount of feedback.  I had heard that some people needed to find some sort of sweet spot to write properly but I have had no problem with it at all.  I always thought it would be a good writer, but in fact it also draws well too--not because it has much line variation but because of the way it feels in the hand and the way it catches the paper.  I find it expressive or it helps me to be expressive.  It also is very beautifully crafted and the so-called space age (circa 1960) material really feels wonderful in the hand.  It is so nice that it surprises me that Lamy doesn't make more variations of the pen in the way that Parker did for its 51 line.  A demonstrator version would be lovely, if it had the same nib.  

 

I have done a much longer review on YouTube at https://youtu.be/jykBdsuPZ7k where I draw my cat Severus and I discuss the relationship of the pen to early 20th Century design. I am curious if other people have joined the cult of Lamy or have resisted.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Nhartist40 said:

I am curious if other people have joined the cult of Lamy or have resisted.

 

I don't like the LAMY Safari and Logo, which are my first few LAMY fountain pens. Some of the ‘blame’ has to go to Noodler's Ink, and also some to me; I didn't know enough about pens and inks at the time, and come to associate LAMY with imprecise, too-broad EF nibs (which is kinda true, at least for the Z50 steel nibs) and poor writing outcomes on paper (which, as it turned out, was mainly the Noodler's inks' fault).

 

I then bought some discounted, limited/commemorative edition LAMY hardcover notebooks that came packaged with rollerball(?) pens. To fit a fountain pen into the pen loops on those notebooks, I purchased a LAMY cp1, and that converted me. I've since bought maybe another dozen LAMY fountain pens.

 

However, if it had been resting on the shoulders of the LAMY 2000 (which I eventually bought, and now have two, one of which has as yet never been inked), then LAMY would probably have remained in my bad graces.

 

All the same, I'm glad you're enjoying yours so much!

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct, and valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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I have bought myself the stainless steel version of the Lamy 2000 with a B nib some years ago and I really love the pen. To me, it is the embodiment of sleek design when uncapped, feeling massive, without the least bit of fuss and ornament, and yet something I want to touch and hold in my hand for hours on end. (In German, we call that a Handschmeichler, a "hand-flatterer", it makes you feel good just by holding it in your hand.) And I love the big fat line that B nib lays down. Not at all suitable for taking tiny notes on the edge of whatever, but oh boy, if you let it loose on a sheet of paper...

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I consider the pen beautiful, and I have owned one. But I sold it because it hurt my hand to use. Turns out I really don't prefer grip sections that narrow from barrel to nib. I am ok with my Carene and my Sheaffer, but not the narrower 2000. 

 

So, my answer to your question is "No, not for me "

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The diameter/s of the section are like a shoe. Get the wrong size, you are going to have a very uncomfortable experience. An expensive experience.

The 2000 would be far too narrow for me also. The Aion would probably suit me better.

The Writing Desk in the UK list the vital stats of the pens they sell to avoid making such mistakes.

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3 hours ago, TSherbs said:

I consider the pen beautiful, and I have owned one. But I sold it because it hurt my hand to use...

 

So, my answer to your question is "No, not for me "


⬆️ Here be wisdom 👍

 

I find my 2000 to be absolutely delightful for me, but when I let a friend try it out she found its ‘nose-heavy’ balance to be absolutely intolerable for her.

 

If anyone is considering buying a Lamy 2000, but is unable to try one out first and is afraid that they may not like the pen, I advise them to check out the prices for which used/‘pre-owned’ ones get sold.

Although the price of a new 2000 is ‘non-trivial’, it seems that the ‘second-hand’ ones can be re-sold at very nearly the purchase price of a new one.
One could decide to think of the difference between the two prices as the cost of ‘renting’ one to try it out.

Foul in clear conditions, but handsome in the fog.

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I greatly enjoy my 2000, but I'm certainly not a diehard Lamy fan, or of any brand for that matter.  I tend to be coldly rational and have the same mindset as TSherbs.  If it's not pleasant to write with, it goes.  Even sold my lovely Parker Falcon for that reason.

 

That being said, the 2000 was the best $200 I have spent in this area.  I have a fine nib on mine that was wet, relatively fine, and extremely smooth right out of the box.  The pen feels good in my hand, too.  I've said several times that I look for excuses to use it when it's inked up.  Can't think of a higher compliment for a pen.

 

@Nhartist40, if you want a compilation of others' opinions on this pen, I have a whole thread I started while considering the 2000.

"Nothing is new under the sun!  Even the thing of which we say, “See, this is new!” has already existed in the ages that preceded us." Ecclesiastes
"Modern Life®️? It’s rubbish! 🙄" - Mercian
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21 hours ago, Nhartist40 said:

I finally bought a Lamy 2000 medium.  I was never that huge fan of the Lamy Safari, but recently I found that a Safari with a medium nib, instead of a fine nib writes nicely.  I got a good deal on a Lamy 2000 and took the plunge and now I get what all the fuss is about.  The nib writes beautifully.  It is smooth with just the right amount of feedback.  I had heard that some people needed to find some sort of sweet spot to write properly but I have had no problem with it at all.  I always thought it would be a good writer, but in fact it also draws well too--not because it has much line variation but because of the way it feels in the hand and the way it catches the paper.  I find it expressive or it helps me to be expressive.  It also is very beautifully crafted and the so-called space age (circa 1960) material really feels wonderful in the hand.  It is so nice that it surprises me that Lamy doesn't make more variations of the pen in the way that Parker did for its 51 line.  A demonstrator version would be lovely, if it had the same nib.  

 

I have done a much longer review on YouTube at https://youtu.be/jykBdsuPZ7k where I draw my cat Severus and I discuss the relationship of the pen to early 20th Century design. I am curious if other people have joined the cult of Lamy or have resisted.

 

 

I was never a big fan of the Safari either (mostly due to the grip section), even though it was the first fountain pen I used after re-discovering fountain pens.  I stayed away from the 2000 for a long time given my experience with the Safari. Then I finally purchased a 2000 when it was on a deep discount, and ended up loving it.  At the time it was a great bargain, given that it has a gold nib and is a piston filler. Now I have 4 of them ranging from EF to B, plus spare oblique nibs.  I like the squared off tipping shape that gives you an architect like experience in the EF and a stub like experience in the B.  All nibs are wet and smooth, though not completely lacking in feedback. The oblique nibs were easy to get as spares and allowed me to try that style of nib.  My only complaint is that the broad and oblique nibs could be a bit more crisp, but that can be fixed with help from a nib specialist. 

 

I quite enjoyed your video review, it was nice to get an Art Historian's perspective on the Bauhaus movement and mid century pens (I feel that the Aurora 88s of the 1940s and 1950s also influenced the design of the 2000;  the Aurora 88 is almost like a transitional pen between the 51 and 2000).  I look forward to seeing more of your videos.

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I have a few Safaris and rarely reach for them.  I have a few Studios and use them often.  My 2000, however, is rarely empty and is used almost daily.  It just works for me.  I have an F nib and it is always wet and will work quite well with most inks I've tried.  

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am glad my review sparked so many comments.  It is for me the joy of fountain pens that they connect so differently with different people.  For me the Lamy 2000 feels perfect, but I could see that for other people it would not work.  I have this response to the Pelikan 140 that so many people rave about.  It is just too small for my hands, and it actually hurts when I write with it.  I will soon do a review of the Pelikan Jazz pen that has a pretty nice nib for the money, but the pen is so uncomfortable I think there should be a warning label on it.  The section is really slipper, and the pen itself is so think that I find it almost impossible to write with.

 

I love the idea of people "renting" their pens.  That is one of the great things about well-made fountain pens.  They can be resold for almost what you paid for them in the first place, and in some cases they even go up in value.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have a Lamy 2000 and a Safari Matt Black with a 1.5 Stub nib.

 

I looked at the Lamy 2000 and reviews for a long time before I 'pulled the plug'.  A member on here talking generally (not about the Lamy 2000)  suggested if you want to get gauge for the size of a fountain pen, you could buy the (cheaper) ballpoint. The L2000 FP was expensive at the time, so I purchased the BP to check the size (£26) It was too thin for my liking, and I hate the clip to this day. 🙁 Anyone who has a L2K ballpoint, try a broad refill! 🙂

 

I'm sure the 'try the ballpoint first' on most pens is good advice.....It's not for the L2K.  The FP is quite a bit larger in diameter IMO.

 

I decided the L2K FP was too expensive for me at the time. I continued to read reviews on here, in particular a member that was a big MB collector/user really rated the L2K.  Then by chance, the L2K was heavily discounted by one seller but only available in a M nib. I ordered the pen. My cursive is quite small, and I found the M to be quite 'wet' (common for L2K from what I gather) I returned the pen to Lamy (Germany) explaining it was 'brand new' and I wanted to swap the nib for a F. I think it took around 5-6 weeks (this was many years ago, I have no idea if they still offer this service. It was all done free of charge) She's been in storage for a while. I really must get her 'inked up' again soon.

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On 2/20/2023 at 11:25 AM, Nhartist40 said:

I love the idea of people "renting" their pens.


Totally agree. I plan for a large percentage of my pens to be eventually end up in the hands of another custodian. 
 

I have a love-hate relationship with my Lamy 2000. It’s one of two non-vintage pens I own. I bought it because I love the design and figured I could get it to write decently. I was wrong. A medium laid down too thick a line and a fine was scratchy. I ended up going with a medium, but had it ground down to halfway between a medium and a fine. Even then, the nib took a lot of tuning on my part to get it to write well. That said, the pen writes beautifully for me now, and I do love the design. I particularly like that it’s a pretty understated pen. I can use it in a meeting without a bunch of people noticing and asking questions. 

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9 minutes ago, es9 said:


Totally agree. I plan for a large percentage of my pens to be eventually end up in the hands of another custodian. 
 

I have a love-hate relationship with my Lamy 2000. It’s one of two non-vintage pens I own. I bought it because I love the design and figured I could get it to write decently. I was wrong. A medium laid down too thick a line and a fine was scratchy. I ended up going with a medium, but had it ground down to halfway between a medium and a fine. Even then, the nib took a lot of tuning on my part to get it to write well. That said, the pen writes beautifully for me now, and I do love the design. I particularly like that it’s a pretty understated pen. I can use it in a meeting without a bunch of people noticing and asking questions. 

My L2K Fine writes 'wet' and is pretty close to most of my Mediums, which is probably why it's not scratchy at all 👍 I thought I had read years ago, so may not be the case now, that Lamy tested the nibs in QC before they left the factory? Both my M and F wrote as they should to me, but I'm pretty easy to please 🙂

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It sounds like some had very different experiences than I had with the 2000.  When I was transitioning into retirement, I decided to purchase a fountain pen or two.  Last time I had purchased a fountain pen had been in the '80's so I thought I'd better do some research.  Initially, I was just going to buy one that I thought looked nice but quickly discovered that there are a LOT of beautiful pens and I could drop hundreds of dollars on something I didn't like.  There are limited brick and mortar stores in the bay area where I could try one out.  The one that popped up was the Lamy store in downtown SF.  The woman who helped me there was very patient and helpful as I tried just about every model under $300.  The ones that stood out for me were the 2000, the Studio with a gold nib (her personal pen) and the Aion (the 2000 being my favorite).  I knew I could purchase online for much cheaper than the Lamy store's premium prices but she was so helpful I bought the least expensive one there, a beautiful, emerald green Aion.  I immediately ordered a 2000 online with a fine nib since it was the most appealing to me and I felt most confident about the purchase since the 2000 seemed to show up on the Top 5 lists of so many people who have way more knowledge than me.  I'm glad I had the opportunity at the Lamy store because, if I had just dipped my toe in the water with a Safari with a steel nib (like the one I owned in the '80's), I don't think I would have gotten into FPs as much as I have.  Even though I have always loved its design since I discovered them in Design school (still do), the Safari tends to be too light and scratchy for my tastes.

 

Since then, I have tumbled down the rabbit hole and have purchased a Studio, a CP1, EF, F and M gold nibs for all, a Gravitas pocket pen, a recent Schon Pocket Six (to open the Jowo #6 trapdoor), and another 2000 with an EF nib for sketching since I found the F nib line a bit fat and wet for sketching.  I lean toward more modern designs as they appeal to me as an Industrial Designer and Design professor.  Overall, I've been really pleased with all of the pens with the exception of the CP1 which flows beautifully with the EF z57 nib but I just can't get used to the skinny body.  I use the 2 pocket pens all of the time since they are such great EDC pens. The Studio with its z55 F nib is probably my smoothest writer and the Aion with a z57 EF nib is my smoothest sketcher.  But, when I sit down to write or sketch for any extended period of time, I always find myself gravitating to my beloved 2000's.

 

I love the 2000s for their aesthetic, their design history, the weight (give or take 5-10 grams), the balance and feel in the hand, the warmth and texture of the material, and how well mine have written from Day 1.  I also love the easy inking, large capacity and the beautifully machined and highly functional spring clip of the 2000.  I tend not to choke up toward the nib so the section diameter and taper doesn't bother me.   I tend to hold them closer to the "ears" which also don't bother me as they seem to bother some people.  I figure that it is either that or the step that is often present between the body and section of many pens.  We're going to be spending a few weeks in Italy soon and I've decided that I'm taking the two 2000's and the two pocket pens.  As much as I want to find a beautiful, colorful more "traditional" looking FP like the gorgeous pens I see everyone posting here, I'm so happy with my current pens that I feel I can wait until I find my perfect grail pen.  Maybe in one of the brick and mortar stores in Italy!

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I was scared to buy one as there are so many reports about nibs, so I stick only with Pilots and Penbbs for now.

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I love the Lamy 2000. Usually I'm an 'ooh shiny' person, but the Lamy is just such a good writer, such a super pen, particularly with a broad nib. Takes plenty of ink, not pernickety in any way, light to hold and warm in the hand. 

 

I do find the ballpoints a bit tricky though; my hand seems to slide up them much too easily. 

Too many pens, too little time!

http://fountainpenlove.blogspot.fr/

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There's a reason it's been in continuous production for 66 years or so. I'll go out on a limb and say it's because people continue to purchase it.

Add lightness and simplicate.

 

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The L2K is my 'Love/Hate' pen.  I've owned at least 5 (all bar one of which were purchased second-hand) and have in turn sold them all on but have always felt the urge to buy another one.  I've had various nibs, medium, broad, oblique...  I currently have one L2K with a medium nib.  I actually cleaned it out last week and have used it a little since.  I love the design and the feel of it but it just doesn't quite write as well as I want it to.  But I shall probably keep it because I know that if I sell it, in six months I'll have the urge to buy another one.....  ;)

http://www.aysedasi.co.uk

 

 

 

 

She turned me into a newt.......

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13 hours ago, Thinkpad_maven said:

I was scared to buy one as there are so many reports about nibs, so I stick only with Pilots and Penbbs for now.

 

There are a lot of other pens though....;)

http://www.aysedasi.co.uk

 

 

 

 

She turned me into a newt.......

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