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Collecting Antique Fountain Pens


gibsonworks
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Hello

I am not sure where I "heard" that black fountain pens are not considered collectible and/or as valuable as other pen colors. Is this true? Thanks.

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Well, I have one Sheaffer Snorkel that FOUR people tried to buy off me at a pen show a few years ago -- INCLUDING the guy who did the rehab on it.  Of course, that was likely more because of the nib.... :rolleyes:

And of course there's the "Black Pen Society".  I'm not a member, BTW -- but I somehow keep finding vintage and semi-vintage pens that are black....

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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6 hours ago, gibsonworks said:

Hello

I am not sure where I "heard" that black fountain pens are not considered collectible and/or as valuable as other pen colors. Is this true? Thanks.

No.  Not hardly.  Early fountain pens were nearly all black. I collect pens from the 1930s.  Pick virtually any pen from that period and you can pretty much rest assured that it was offered in black.  Pursue your tastes.  Black can be an elegant color for a pen.

 

Cliff

“The only thing most people do better than anyone else is read their own handwriting.”  John Adams

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15 hours ago, gibsonworks said:

Thanks, Cliff.

 

You are quite welcome!  If I can find the time, perhaps later this week, I will gather all of my black, vintage pens together and photograph them as a group, and then post them to this thread.  They're nothing spectacular but include a 1927 Sheaffer Flat Top, a 1930's "dollar pen", a few Parkers (51s, 45s, 21s, Parkette) and some others.

 

Cliff

“The only thing most people do better than anyone else is read their own handwriting.”  John Adams

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My small collection of vintage British pens has more black pens than the others put together. Why? I like black pens, and I suspect most people in the 1920s, '30s, and '40s did as well. Hence more black pens from that era were made, and as a result, more are available (and perhaps cheaper) now.

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It could be that black was easier to get/make than to change things around to using other colors of rodstock.

Of course I'm now minded of the old Ford adage about the Model T: "You can have any color you want, as long as it's black...."

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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Besides at several of the fountain pen shows, I've found the group, The Black Pen Society.  If you like black pens, then go for it!

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

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