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Drying piston-fillers.


Darryl Foster
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About four days ago I flushed out my TWSBI ECO. My intention was to see whether it would dry without being taken apart. However, at the time of writing, it still has small drops of water inside the barrel. When I flushed it I wicked the nib and assumed - or, rather hoped - that it would air dry, albeit slowly. As anyone else experience of this? 

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1  Ignore and refill

2  Place nib down in a glass resting on tissue until.

"Simplicate and add Lightness."

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Wouldn't the tissue stop air getting into the barrel and so allowing the water droplets to evaporate? 

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Water in the pen won't evaporate anyway, since there'd be little or no airflow unless you're constantly working the piston; and even if you are, you'll get RSI long before you see any change. The tissue would wick away water through the feed and nib, and encourage whatever's in the barrel to drain out.

 

You could always try the pen centrifuge (pentrifuge?) if you really need to avoid taking apart the pen, although a good shake and a wipe with a tissue* should get out enough water that what's left won't make any noticeable difference to the next load of ink.

 

(* We're no longer teenagers, are we?)

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I don't know what a 'pen centrifuge' is. Even so , I got fed up with waiting for my TWSBI ECO to dry, so I inked it up. 

The reason I was eager to get the pen to dry (without having to take it apart) was my concern about causing wear and tear. Many of my pens are stored and it - so I believe - is important to make sure they are dry. I conducted my 'drying experiment' in the hope that, should the pen dry, I could apply the same technique to my other piston-fillers. Alas, this was not so.

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On 9/23/2022 at 1:18 PM, Darryl Foster said:

I don't know what a 'pen centrifuge' is.

Follow the link in my previous reply. It's a neat idea and looks quite cheap and simple to make. It'll help you empty a pen completely without having to worry about where the mess will end up.

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Novel though the idea is I can't help but think of the consequences should the pen come loose while spinning. I mean it is only obvious that the nib would be crushed. 

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13 minutes ago, Darryl Foster said:

I can't help but think of the consequences should the pen come loose while spinning.

 

Then don't let it come loose! It's not as if the creator of the device has not already thought of that:

 

On 7/2/2006 at 6:11 AM, Ron Z said:

One other important item - the end ouf the spout is lined up with a solid, wide piece in the basket (just happens to be at the end of the rib). This stops smaller pens and things like 75 or 51 sections from flying out through the holder, and the nib through the holes in the basket. The nib will press against the plastic tab, but that's OK.

 

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct, and valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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12 hours ago, Darryl Foster said:

 Maybe there's the risk of silicone grease being forced into the feed by the centripetal force.  

 

Ron has probably repaired more pens than a lot of us on here have even seen or had in our hands.

 

Aside from that, I'm PRETTY sure he modeled it after something that Parker sold to repair shops back in the 40s to help with cleaning out 51s. That's especially significant as 51s are notoriously difficult to get both clean and also empty completely. The Parker version, which I've seen for sale on a few occasions, was basically a big bowl with a motor mounted to the bottom and a metal arm that had a tube for the pen attached to one side.

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I had no idea of this. I'm sure it's a fine machine, but I just wondered about the force pushing some silicone grease into the feed. Of course, water would be expelled but if only a small amount of grease were to find its way into the feed it would be very difficult to clean out. That said, I suppose it would be dependant on the velocity of the drum as I assume water would need a lower velocity than silicone grease to be expelled.

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I've been using the centrifuge, and a motorized version,  since I built the original in the thread, so about 15 years or more.  Because I test every pen that I restore, I use the the motorized version with just about every pen that comes through the shop.  We're talking about thousands of pens at this point.   Silicone grease migration won't happen - it's too thick and the good stuff is designed to resist washing off, while most of the ink and/or water comes out in the first few seconds. 

 

The design of the hand cranked centrifuge was triggered when I  discovered that the Whirlclean that Parker sold to dealers was hand cranked.  :eureka:       The motorized one that I made is essentially a copy of Parker's design with readily available parts.

 

 

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