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"Historical" Red and Green Ink Question.


afishhunter

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On 8/2/2022 at 5:07 AM, Z man said:

By the way, there are a little more than a couple gallons of inks from the 1930s through the 1950s on my shelves with more up to the 1990s. There is no consistency because formations came and went. Also, as just one example, Sheaffer had a dozen color variations in the 1950s.

 

It would be very nice to see photos of your vintage ink bottles, please, if it wouldn't be too much trouble. 

Script nib for writing screenplays. • Fine nib for my best writing. • Extra fine for my *very* best writing. • Medium for requesting a séance. • Bold for adventure stories. • Manifold for many various types of writing. • Coarse for indignant letters. • Oblique for making a point in a roundabout way. • Italic when I'm inclined. • Stub for when I intend to leave a manuscript unfinis

 

My pens for sale: https://www.facebook.com/jaiyen.pens

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On 8/2/2022 at 12:19 AM, afishhunter said:

think this is where I should post my question.

Concerning the red and green fountain pen inks commonly used in the 1920's/1930's to the 1960's/1970's:

Was the Red a "Fire Engine" bright red (similar to that of today's ballpoint red) or were there commonly available variations, such as maroon, "brick red" or a "red-black" commonly available? 

Was the Green a Grass/Bright Green (similar to that of today's ballpoint green) or were there commonly available darker shades of green commonly available?

 

Aside from Black, Blue-Black, Red, and Green, were other colors of fountain pen inks, such as (but not limited to) Browns and Purples, commonly available?

 

Thank you in advance

 

Thank you for posting this question. I'd love to see more discussion of vintage ink. Sometimes experienced folks and/or experts will chime in and it's useful to have a collection of information in one place. 

 

(And please don't hesitate to ask any fountain pen-related question. If it's a question someone isn't interested in or doesn't like then they always have the choice to ignore it.)

Script nib for writing screenplays. • Fine nib for my best writing. • Extra fine for my *very* best writing. • Medium for requesting a séance. • Bold for adventure stories. • Manifold for many various types of writing. • Coarse for indignant letters. • Oblique for making a point in a roundabout way. • Italic when I'm inclined. • Stub for when I intend to leave a manuscript unfinis

 

My pens for sale: https://www.facebook.com/jaiyen.pens

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4 hours ago, PithyProlix said:

And please don't hesitate to ask any fountain pen-related question. If it's a question someone isn't interested in or doesn't like then they always have the choice to ignore it.)

Exactly right. I hope the OP comes back to experience the truly helpful part of FPN. 

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@amberleadavis Here's an Inky T O D for you: "Show Us Yer Vintage Ink". I didn't find a similar topic. 

Script nib for writing screenplays. • Fine nib for my best writing. • Extra fine for my *very* best writing. • Medium for requesting a séance. • Bold for adventure stories. • Manifold for many various types of writing. • Coarse for indignant letters. • Oblique for making a point in a roundabout way. • Italic when I'm inclined. • Stub for when I intend to leave a manuscript unfinis

 

My pens for sale: https://www.facebook.com/jaiyen.pens

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1 hour ago, PithyProlix said:

@amberleadavis Here's an Inky T O D for you: "Show Us Yer Vintage Ink". I didn't find a similar topic. 

 

Absolutely, do you  have pictures to share. I'll have to hunt some down.  If you get a chance, start the topic, I'll be back at a real computer by Monday.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, amberleadavis said:

 

Absolutely, do you  have pictures to share. I'll have to hunt some down.  If you get a chance, start the topic, I'll be back at a real computer by Monday.

 

I'll need to take some photos but I can certainly get it started.

 

:thumbup:

Script nib for writing screenplays. • Fine nib for my best writing. • Extra fine for my *very* best writing. • Medium for requesting a séance. • Bold for adventure stories. • Manifold for many various types of writing. • Coarse for indignant letters. • Oblique for making a point in a roundabout way. • Italic when I'm inclined. • Stub for when I intend to leave a manuscript unfinis

 

My pens for sale: https://www.facebook.com/jaiyen.pens

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6 hours ago, Misfit said:

Exactly right. I hope the OP comes back to experience the truly helpful part of FPN. 

My thoughts also. 

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Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Skrip Emerald Green (#72) is the only I have had to date.

20220807_143703.jpg

Brad

"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain

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What an interesting question!

 

To build on it, I wonder how a pen or ink company today decided what type of red or green to make. If you were to make [YOURNAME] Red, how would it look?

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On 8/4/2022 at 11:59 AM, inkstainedruth said:

No, the term is "being RUDE".  

There was NO reason for Z man to answer a newbie that way.  None whatsoever.

I'd like to apologize to the OP for Z man's behavior.  (Of course, it would be NICER if Z man did his OWN apologies in future....)

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


Amen.

My other pen is a Montblanc and...

 

My other blog is a tumblr.

 

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8 hours ago, Muncle said:

What an interesting question!

 

To build on it, I wonder how a pen or ink company today decided what type of red or green to make. If you were to make [YOURNAME] Red, how would it look?

 

IMMHO, Most likely, as Diamine, Montblanc, Pilot, Waterman, Sailor and most others do, it would be a range of red shades.

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