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Montblanc x Fritz Schimpf 149 Italic Edge


Tom Kellie

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Posted Images

1346815883_SpecialEditionItalicEdge.thumb.JPG.635a3046db6eb0ce92089397a7580876.JPG

 

Special Edition — Italic Edge

 

 

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Third Collaboration Pen

 

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968371225_ItalicEdgeNib.thumb.JPG.c1be4ce14be6ad6e7421e4c4456a80ba.JPG

 

Italic Edge Nib

 

 

1185154689_ItalicEdgeEngraving.thumb.JPG.49d27e6e65b6b3f18bbd7c54e3a44743.JPG

 

Italic Edge Engraving

 

 

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Fritz Schimpf Engraving

 

 

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Fritz Schimpf

 

 

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Thanks for the pictures Tom! Hoping to get mine tomorrow. I was also thinking of using Fritzrot ink.  It just feels right for such a fine 149. 

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I measured my nib width at about 2.1mm.  Writing with it is a different experience than writing with any stub I’ve tried in the 1.1 -1.3mm range, and also very different than a customized Platinum Coarse nib ground to 1.2mm CI by Dan Smith. They all seem crisper than this nib, which has significantly more tipping than any of those nibs when compared, and, of course, it has more surface area in contact with the paper by way of its breadth alone, and it seems a wet writer.  Still, the line variation is there, and it is remarkably smooth and forgiving so far. I’m interested to hear the experience of others as they write with it.

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Very desirable! What's the written line width? It looks like this might be a "next-level" sort of pen for those who otherwise write with a 2mm Lamy Stub or a 1.9mm F-C Music nib, the latter especially. I don't know of many gold stub nibs close to 2mm in width. 

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5 minutes ago, arcfide said:

Very desirable! What's the written line width? It looks like this might be a "next-level" sort of pen for those who otherwise write with a 2mm Lamy Stub or a 1.9mm F-C Music nib, the latter especially. I don't know of many gold stub nibs close to 2mm in width. 

 

~ @arcfide:

 

Thank you for your kind comment.

 

Perhaps others who've received Italic Edge will be much better qualified to answer your question.

 

Italic Edge is truly a joy for writing and sketching, once a more dry ink balances the generous ink flow.

 

The carefully crafted nib tip is such that it's smooth, with crisp corners.

 

This is a pen well-suited for prolonged writing sessions on large pads of paper.

 

Not an ornament for display, Italic Edge is manifestly a working pen created to meet the needs of those who truly love to write.

 

Having written that, it bears mentioning that this afternoon several bottles of rather dry ink have been ordered.

 

As you put it, Italic Edge is a highly desirable writing and sketching tool.

 

         Tom K.

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From Fritz Schimpf’s website:

With a vertical stroke width of approximately 1.40 mm and a horizontal stroke width of approximately 0.30 mm,

 

Like you, Tom, I found drier inks performed well in the nib, with much shading.  Waterman Serenity Blue felt incredible, but was very wet.  I finally found a nib for Kyo-no-too Aonibi.  Robert Oster inks have also performed well so far.

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~ @Carrau:

 

What a great suggestion — Kyo-no-oto Aonibi (青鈍)

 

A bottle sits on my ink shelves. I'll try it.

 

Thank you also for the recommendation of Robert Oster inks.

 

After an afternoon of experimentation, the driest inks invariably resulted in the most satisfactory strokes, lines, curves, and dots.

 

It's quite a nib, isn't it? 

 

If other inks work well in your Italic Edge, I'll look forward to knowing about them as I respect your sound judgment.

 

           Tom K.

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I was bowled over with its performance out of the box with the Waterman Serenity Blue, and I’m sure it will reveal its capabilities with time and experimentation with technique and other inks.  It is a big nib, however, I think this will be right in your wheelhouse, Tom.

 

I always liked Aonibi’s color, but never found the right nib for it, and it languished.  Recently I have been writing with an extra-fine Diplomat Excellence, which is dramatically different from the 149EI in many ways, and requires very little pressure.  I have had to pay attention at the beginning of capital letters with the 149 EI / dry inks and apply a bit of pressure to start letters requiring a SW to NE upstroke to begin, or I see nothing on the paper.  That was not the case with Serenity Blue, being wetter in this nib.  Also, Serenity Blue had no difficulty with a purely vertical downstroke, using the nib in its broadest face.  When I tried this with drier inks, however, there was a little skipping with Aonibi.  I didn’t see this with RO Midnight Sapphire.  The peculiarities of inks, nibs, and papers.                               
 

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The price is breathtaking, even allowing for current inflation in the EU and US (albeit today the Euro and dollar though are equivalent so, for those with the funds, this might be an opportune moment to buy).

 

Given the numerous cautionary notes on the Schrimpf website regarding use and care of this nib, I'll be interested in learning your longer-term writing experience, inks you've found best suited to this nib and paper required to achieve optimum performance.

 

 

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Absolutely beautiful, Tom. Your photography continues to delight all of us. The new Fritz Schimpf Italic Edge 149 is a masterpiece. Its name is appropriate. It is a stunning fountain pen with a remarkable nib, even to those of us who are not especially drawn to wider nibs. Thank you for once again sharing your fountain pens and writing bounty. Enjoy it in good health for many years. Best wishes, Barry

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