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Having ink flow issue on my Jinhao 85


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On 7/13/2022 at 9:28 PM, Number99 said:

Hello.

 

 I'm not an expert so I'm sorry if I'm wrong.

 

 Go back to the first image and tap the photo with the nibs.

 Next, tap the image with two xes in the upper right corner again to greatly enlarge the image.

 

 Looking at the nib points that appear in the resulting image, you can see the notebook paper on the other side through the gap. (It may be a reflection of light)

 It also looks like a foreign object is caught in the slit.

 

 If this is a foreign object, is this a deliberate insertion? (There is a description that the slit is widened), and does it affect the ink flow?

 

large.1544471640_Screenshot_20220714-0051242.png.ca8f38130ad89b18f1da752f6ac8e0f1.png

 

 

Sorry for very late reply, upon seeing this magnified image I tried to unclog the nib slit using very thin sheet of aluminum. But the issue with the ink flow is still there! 

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I use 3M #10000 polishing film to clean the slits, but be careful as it can be too flowy. (If the slit is the cause) (In that case, 1 or 2 times each to treat both sides equally)

 

 I've read about using some finer abrasive film or a feeler gauge (I've never used one) if it's just to remove debris.

 

 For reference, when the flow is bad, I first do an ultrasonic cleaning with a baking soda cleaning solution.

 

 If you plan to own a lot of fountain pens, it might be a good idea to prepare various tools and materials little by little based on the posts and opinions of experts rather than beginners like me.

 

 Or replace the pen tip unit.

 

 Sorry for going back to the starting line.

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/193157-wtb-tool-for-cleaning-nib-slits/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Number99
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I wonder if the front end of the feed is pressing upwards too tightly against the underside of the nib tines area?

 

Here is a simple experiment to try....

 

With scissors, cut a narrow strip of aluminium kitchen foil. Narrow enough to pass through the round holes at the front of the nib.

Pass the foil strip down through one hole and up through the other.

Slide the feed into the nib, without tearing the foil. That may need a few attempts. (In my kitchen drawer are rolls of standard foil and one roll of "non-stick" foil. The non-stick foil has a PTFE coating on one face, making it more tear resistant. It's thickness measures around 0.1mm, so ideal for this job.)

Snip off the tails of foil.

Test to see if that works!!!!!

IMG_20220806_164954-01.thumb.jpeg.4ffb5340fe2d0fd052410688e836c1cd.jpeg

 

In a pen with an open curved nib, and an ebonite feed, the small gap between tip of feed and nib can be adjusted by heat-setting the feed. Recommended gap size is "about the thickness of a sheet of paper".

 

With a tubular nib and plastic feed we need to find other ways to achieve the same result.

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I don't own this pen and hate to make assumptions but would love to help if i can. And i feel like everyone going a little bit too* deep into the problem when it might be simpler, maybe i'm wrong though.
 

On the third post Dipper gave you a good suggestions that you might want to re-read and to which i would like to add a few things that you might already heard before:
 1. Like Dipper already suggested - when you reassemble the pen check converter for airpockets/bubbles they can be a huge problem in the ink flow and form when you place converter into the pen not when pen converter is already outside of the pen ofc.
 2. Second thing is - how do you fill your pen? you just fill the converter like cartridge and stick it into the pen or you fill whole converter through the nib?  I can assume that you are refilling converter separately and then place it into the pen which is a ok thing to do, but if it's true I would like to propose few things for you to try: 

  • Try to refill the pen directly from the bottle, stick the pen into the bottle and pull the ink directly through the nib and feed, then dump it all back once and then refill one final time again, it will help to remove any trapped air or bubbles and your feed will have enough ink to make a clear path for ink from converter. 
  • Second method that also usually helps if you fill the converter separately - dip the pen with installed converter directly into the ink bottle making sure that whole feed is in, let it sit there for a minute or less, pull the pen out and clean it on the outside, it's a method if you do not like to refill the pen directly from the bottle, i myself do not exactly can explain how it works but for me it helped multiple times already, what it essentially does - it saturates all the channels and fins of the feed with as much ink as possible which helps the ink from the converter/cartridge to find it's way through all this saturated channels to the nib easier, and once they are saturated with ink you are fine to go all the way until converter/cartridge ends.
  • Third method - fill the converter and place it in pen, turn the pen nib up and start slowly turning the converter until you see ink through the hood opening or on your fingers lol, let it sit there for few moments and then start turning it back to return ink into the converter, what it does is similar to first method - you remove air bubbles from the converter or if it's trapper somewhere in the feed by forcing it through the feed to the nib and into the air.

If you are using cartridge for example second method works the best imho.
 

I had a similar sounding problem in a different pen a while ago, it was a fresh refill of the cartridge but the pen was skipping after a few lines, the flow was there but it was really really slow, it was happening for like 3 days straight and none of my usual methods like shaking or dipping a tip of the nib into the water didn't helped for long, turns out not only did i had an air bubble there which i couldn't remove from cartridge (no tapping on the side of the pen/cartridge with finger helped to remove it, which worked for me before), but also I pretty much didn't had any ink in the feed because when i decided to clean it to try to refill it again the water was almost crystal clean after placing feed into the water. So after that cleaning and reassemble i installed the cartridge again and it did helped a little bit but what helped me the most was the second method i described - just sticking pen into the bottle of ink until whole feed is saturated, and I haven't had any bad flow since. Your feed looks clean, your nib looks clean, it's a new pen that you cleaned multiple times already, assembly of this hooded nib pens is simpler than for any regular one, i feel like there shouldn't be any problems and right now I suspect a bad refill process. Like Dipper described on the previous post "feed is pressing upwards too tightly" could also be a problem, doubt you have one of those though.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/6/2022 at 9:49 PM, dipper said:

I wonder if the front end of the feed is pressing upwards too tightly against the underside of the nib tines area?

 

Here is a simple experiment to try....

 

With scissors, cut a narrow strip of aluminium kitchen foil. Narrow enough to pass through the round holes at the front of the nib.

Pass the foil strip down through one hole and up through the other.

Slide the feed into the nib, without tearing the foil. That may need a few attempts. (In my kitchen drawer are rolls of standard foil and one roll of "non-stick" foil. The non-stick foil has a PTFE coating on one face, making it more tear resistant. It's thickness measures around 0.1mm, so ideal for this job.)

Snip off the tails of foil.

Test to see if that works!!!!!

IMG_20220806_164954-01.thumb.jpeg.4ffb5340fe2d0fd052410688e836c1cd.jpeg

 

In a pen with an open curved nib, and an ebonite feed, the small gap between tip of feed and nib can be adjusted by heat-setting the feed. Recommended gap size is "about the thickness of a sheet of paper".

 

With a tubular nib and plastic feed we need to find other ways to achieve the same result.

Thanks a ton @dipper ,yes your guess about feed pressing too hard against the nib was right. I took out the feed and nib and placed it in hot water mimicking heat setting of ebonite feed. And to my astonishment it worked, the writing experience changed drastically, from dry dessert like writter to wet and juicy ink flow! Your suggestions genuinely saved my pen! 

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