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question about antique fountain pen


Al-Muizz 953
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Can anyone advise whether this antique pen is likely to be usable, based on the below photo?  Is it salvageable?  Would it use a cartridge/converter or is it a quill-style dip-only pen?  I understand it is made out of bakelite so probably dates to before 1930.


Thanks in advance.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.b430b1be2d912446eb0a0bcd10a597c6.jpeg

 

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It's a dip pen. It appears that the nibs are interchangeable although I don't know if they are of a standard modern size. 

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13 hours ago, OCArt said:

It's a dip pen. It appears that the nibs are interchangeable although I don't know if they are of a standard modern size. 

thank you OCArt

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It's lovely, and definitely still useable as OCArt says, it's a dip pen so has no internal reservoir. 

It looks like the nib collar / ferrule is rusted, but these can be replaced if it's a standard size, or you may wish to keep it original. (Here's what the collar looks like removed: https://tomsstudio.com/products/nib-ferrule )

Most dip nibs have a standard width / curve to their shank but there are some that are smaller. Mapping pens and crow quills are very obviously different as they have a tubular body rather than an open curve, but some Japanese nibs also have a different fit to European nibs. 

It's worth pointing out that the nib doesn't fit into the middle of the nib collar where the four flanges form a cross, but between the edge of the flanges and the collar rim. It can be a stiff fit. If a nib rusts in place it can necessitate pulling the whole collar out and discarding it. The vast majority of dip nibs are semi-disposable. They will rust over time, and pointed nibs will blunt and occasionally snap. I can't give a timeframe because it depends how much the nib gets used rather than timespan of use.

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Lots of different flex rates in dip pen nibs........many chase 'Wet Noodle' superflex fountain pens; my limited experience is that Wet Noodles are out flexed by 2/3rds of the dip pen nibs.

 

You will have to look for them. On the whole not expensive out side perhaps the Leonards (sp), Hunt 99-100-101 (I lucked into.), Gillette 303/404. I've seen those Hunts and Gilettes....which flex if there is an earthquake in California.

 

It's a nice set, more IMO for the matching letter opener.

Bakelite I'm sure was in use up to the '40's.....but there were other plastics in use back in the day.

Pool balls from 1875. The plastic coating of Martin guitars from at latest 1920, perhaps before. 

 

Look up what AA Andrew has to say about dip pens and nibs, he's the resident expert.

 

Just because something is from the '30's don't make it all that 'old'.B)

I've a few dip pens close to 1900 my guess, that I didn't even make a photo of.

 

I don't know what it would cost.....but I'm stuck in yesteryear's prices.

Someone else could tell you if it's a fair deal or a rip off.

 

 

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Bo Bo Olson said:

 

Bakelite I'm sure was in use up to the '40's.....but there were other plastics in use back in the day.

Pool balls from 1875. The plastic coating of Martin guitars from at latest 1920, perhaps before. 

 

Martin guitars (and many others) used nitrocellulose lacquer, and ping pong balls were also nitrocellulose. So they have plenty in common with a fair few vintage fountain pens!

 

 

Instagram @inkysloth

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