Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Bock #6 gold EF


Jacqueline W.
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello fountain pen collective wisdom:

 

I wonder if you could highlight me here. I've been for many, many years writing exclusively with an Aurora 88 extra fine gold nib or Japanese fine nibs (my usual ones have been those on Platinum 3776, Pilot 823 and the Prera), and have only very recently started to be less dogmatic, and use Bock nibs. I know that European F nibs are in general too broad for me, especially the Lamy and Pelikan. I have recently received a beautiful handmade pen with a steel nib Bock #6 Fine, but I found the nib too broad, so I ordered recently an extra fine, 14k Gold. To my surprise, I can barely see any difference when I write with the EF gold... It is still too broad. I thought first it was an ink or a paper issue, but I tried on several different brands with different inks, from wet to dry, and on the most fountain friendly papers, but it is still too broad for my own writing.

I do have another pen equipped with a Bock #8 extra fine platinum and that one does satisfies me, so why is the Bock #6 gold extra fine still too broad? Is it due to the metal choice? (I'm very ignorant on those matters, but would love to know the why...)

Also, I'm posting a picture here of the two nibs, on the left the Bock steel F, and on the right the Bock gold EF (I had a bit of a hard time seeing the difference between both nibs to be frank!) 

Thank you in advance for your thoughts! 

 

Jacqueline 

bock_06_steel_gold.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 15
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • amberleadavis

    3

  • mke

    1

  • hairlame

    2

  • Jacqueline W.

    4

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

I think the modern steel nibs are very nice and for the most part write just as well as modern gold nibs. 

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

But why does the gold Extra fine write as broad as the steel Fine? That was my question. 

 

Edited by Jacqueline W.
typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Because of the feed. Look at the breather hold and see how the feed channel is much more open on the steel nib.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Jacqueline W. said:

But why does the gold Extra fine write as broad as the steel Fine

Someone told me that gold nibs generally write a bit broader than the corresponding steel nibs. Might be that your Fine is at the lower limit of Fine, near to the EF. Personally, I find Bock/Jowo F extremely broad.

 

I recently got a Bock Pt950, grinded to a XXF, I guess such a custom-grind (XXF) would suit you better than a factory EF (which has a range of size).

Certainly, it is a little bit finer than a Pilot F - probably similar to a Platinum EF.

 

Here is a comparison between one of my Jowo 18k EFs and my Bock Pt950 XXF:

 

 

 

EF-XXF.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OH, and the ink makes a difference and the paper, and the air pressure - temperature ... sort of like cats, no two are exactly the same.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

Create a Ghostly Avatar and I'll send you a letter. Check out some Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 

Don't know where to start?  Look at the Inky Topics O'day.  Then, see inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks! the gold nib #6 EF has more of a "buttery" feel when I write, while the platinum EF (#8) that I have has more feedback but writes finer. 

Well, I'll have my EF gold Bock nib custom-ground at the first occasion... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

are you writing with the same light pressure on the gold nib as the steel nib?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Jacqueline W. said:

(I had a bit of a hard time seeing the difference between both nibs to be frank!)

 

Well, we can't see the underside of the tipping on the nibs, and that's what really matters. That said,

large.1909974063_JacquelineW.sBock14KgoldEFnibandsteelFnibheadtohead.jpg.73109f572a1247fa5e04313fdb894714.jpg

 

I'd say (what remains of the ball of) the tipping material on the gold EF nib is more elongated in shape, so its underside may well have been ground to have a marginally narrower contact surface with the page. However, I also think the tine gap on the gold EF nib is marginally wider, thus the nib is ‘tuned’ slightly wetter, notwithstanding that the steel F nib sits above an apparently much wider and deeper ink channel; the tine gap on the latter is extremely tight. Then there's the question of whether the surface of the inner walls on the tines of the gold nib is more wettable than that of the steel nib; of that I'm not sure.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

@SpecTP: yes, I've been using the same pen (a Ranga Abhimanyu) with these two different nibs, and with same inks too. The gold EF nib was always broader.

 

@A Smug Dill: thank you for doing this comparison! now I totally see why.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Jacqueline W. said:

Thanks! the gold nib #6 EF has more of a "buttery" feel when I write, while the platinum EF (#8) that I have has more feedback but writes finer. 

Well, I'll have my EF gold Bock nib custom-ground at the first occasion... 

That was going to be my suggestion!  

Festina lente

Optimism kills

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/30/2022 at 10:12 PM, Jacqueline W. said:

Thanks! the gold nib #6 EF has more of a "buttery" feel when I write, while the platinum EF (#8) that I have has more feedback but writes finer. 

Well, I'll have my EF gold Bock nib custom-ground at the first occasion... 

If you're still looking, I've had good luck with the steel EF bock nib (Kaweco branded #6 version for the Supra). I got it on a whim and was impressed that it wrote a nice wet fine line, pretty close to a Sailor fine nib, with no adjustment needed.

I got the EF because I wasn't keen on the relatively broad line from the Bock F nib. I wasn't expecting much, but was surprised at how much finer and crisper the steel EF was compared to the the steel F.  Thank you for posting the pictures of the Bock 14k EF nib, I would not have expected that the tipping width was so close to a steel F nib!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my general observation on nib width is that the potential for overlap between adjacent widths increases as the line width decreases, since the linear measure required to effect a proportional difference shrinks.

 

of course feed flow and tine gap will play a significant role as well ...and again, the smaller the tip, the more a subtle change in flow might be seen.

 

I don't knowingly own any Bock nibs, but I've noticed a significant amount of line width overlap between F and EF nibs from Jowo and Pelikan, most often manifesting as EF nibs that lay down lines no thinner than an F from the same maker :(

Japanese manufacturers aren't exempt either, many of my marked Pilot EFs are only subtly finer than concurrent F nibs (though plenty of unmarked, or "posting" nib Pilots from the 60s are significantly finer than 70's and later F nibs).

 

any way you look at it, judging the relationship between these two nibs, with their different elasticity and tipping profiles is not going to tell you much, especially since sample variation is likely to be almost as significant as type differences.

David-

 

So many restoration projects...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, awa54 said:

I don't knowingly own any Bock nibs, but I've noticed a significant amount of line width overlap between F and EF nibs from Jowo and Pelikan, most often manifesting as EF nibs that lay down lines no thinner than an F from the same maker :(

 

I've definitely noticed the same thing with Jowo nibs, which is one of the reasons I was surprised by the strong difference in tipping between the Bock EF and F steel nibs. But my sample size is low, so I don't know if its just random chance or if there's a clear and consistent difference between the Bock EF and F nibs.  I'm slightly tempted to get another Bock EF just to see, but that will  have to wait for another pen purchase...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I can see the tip of the feed from the tine gap, that means the pen is too wet for my taste since I use regular cheap old school notebooks. I press the tines together until no light shines through and I have my personal favourite type of pen flow. I really don't enjoy light as a feather pens - that makes the tip too small for the broadness of the pen and forces an unnecessary amount of lightness of hand which is tiresome in prolonged stretches of writing. I have to be able to enjoy the pen as I like it which needs some pressure for the cursive without babysitting the pen too much. I don't see why pen manufacturers wouldn't size the nibs using a single tip size with different flow options. I wouldn't say no to smoother fine tips with more resilience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a Jowo #6 14K EF in my pocket now, although it's actually an "Edison Flex" nib with their cut-outs and of course Brian's tuning to get it to my preferred fairly wet but not a firehose performance.

 

It's definitely on the wider side and I'd put it fatter than say my F-marked celluloid 146 and some of my other marked German pens. It's definitely wider than my EF celluloid 149. I have a lot of American pens that I call Fs, but who the heck knows what size they actually are(barring the stubs/obliques, I just call my widest 51 an F, my narrowest an XXF, and the others XFs whether or not that's actually correct but I think it's close).

 

I've come around to realizing as a general rule that I can write well(or legibly at least) with stub-ground B and larger nibs, so do great with a typical B 146 or 149. I DON'T get along so well with standard round Bs. My main pen for YEARS was an 80s MB 146 in M, and I'm finding on the more recent MBs I've bought that even the Ms are getting too big/sloppy for me and I've resolved to never intentionally buy a new Montblanc M again(or have it swapped if that's all I can get on something I want). Since a lot of shops only stock Ms and Fs now, I'm going to be sending a lot in for either EFs or Bs...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share








×
×
  • Create New...