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jchch1950
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Many pen users change the nibs on their pens, the reasons are multiple: performance, spare nibs,  dream pens were destroy. etc. But in some cases the pens that we wish to buy are available only with a limited options of nibs[ex:fine and medium ; extra fine and fine] but the same brand offers many other wides [broad,italic,stub, etc]. Will you agree  to buy at the same time a Pen  and a replacement nib knowing that he original nib is going to your spare parts box?

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19 minutes ago, jchch1950 said:

Will you agree  to buy at the same time a Pen  and a replacement nib knowing that he original nib is going to your spare parts box?

 

It depends. If I didn't have any PenBBS fountain pens already, but was desperate to try a PenBBS calligraphy nib — which, as far as I'm aware, is not available factory-fitted in any new PenBBS pens — then, yes, certainly. Ditto ordering a standalone Pelikan M205 BB nib from a German retailer, because apparently they aren't available through other European or overseas retailers, disregarding random sellers on eBay who may not actually be authorised Pelikan dealers in the region(s) in which they're domiciled. I wouldn't buy a new Pelikan fountain pen if I can get it much more cheaply from my trusted retailers in the Netherlands or the UK, so I'm probably still better off in terms of total expense to get a (cheaper) new pen and then a standalone BB nib, than to order a new Pelikan M2xx factory-fitted with a BB nib from Germany.

 

In any case, I have dozens of spare nibs sitting in a box, including more than ten Pelikan M20x nibs, and several Kaigelu 35mm nibs after they were swapped out and replaced by Kaigelu's NMF nibs (which had to be bought standalone). So I don't have any objection in principle to having spare nibs on hand, or doing things the more convoluted way if it ends up costing me less all up.

 

I've even bought multiple full fountain pens just to harvest their nibs to put into some other pen; for example, several Pilot Plumix and Pluminix pens for their broad-edged F, M, and B ‘calligraphy’ nibs, and a whole bunch of Nemosine pens for their <1.1mm-wide Stub nibs. Whether to keep the rest of the Nemosine Fission pen (which I discovered I seriously dislike) components in a spare parts box, or simply to throw them out with the trash, is the more irksome question.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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@A Smug DillWhat is a "Kaigelu's NMF nib?"  Is it the "long knife?"  Thanks

Children think adults have all the freedom and adults think children have
all the freedom.
 

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5 hours ago, OCArt said:

What is a "Kaigelu's NMF nib?"  Is it the "long knife?"

 

Affirmative.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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It seems a waste, yes. This particularly happens to me with vintage pens. I bought a Silver metal Parker 75 "Ciselè" that came with a medium size gold nib. Recently, I found a special nib: Accountant extra fine size, that is very juicy and writes softly, even tough this is a extra extra fine one. Now, this is a pen that rarely left unused.

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It depends. I prefer stubs so this may happen for me more than the average person.

 

Also depends on the brand, its swapability, and what options they have available. Sailor, I'm looking at you.

 

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23 hours ago, OCArt said:

What is a "Kaigelu's NMF nib?"  Is it the "long knife?"

 

 Mr Search Engine sez yes.

"Simplicate and add Lightness."

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I buy old used pens.....'vintage' or semi-vintage, so I can get any nib I want.

And sending an adequate nib to be thinned is SOP for many narrow nib lovers who want a needle nib.

Thought Japanese EF nibs should take care of the skinny wants.

 

I had a no line variation at all:crybaby:  OB Lamy Persona 18 K nail. It made into a CI B by Pendelton Brown.  His writing. EIj4i9e.jpg

FWL4Clr.jpg

 

I tend to think find a pen with a nib in the flex rate you want and send it to a pro to be made thinner, and or made into a Stub or CI or what ever and instead of hunting far and wide for "perfection", have perfection made exactly  for you by a pro.

IMO it would help to have a picture of how you hold a pen, so he/she can craft the exact angle you need.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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I don't usually opt for a spare nib, but I might opt for a second nib with a different size. I usually order EF nibs, but I did opt for a second B nib when I ordered my Santini pen.

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I recently ordered a plated B for my Pelikan M200 Cognac. It came with a fine, and its ok, but almost too fine for my tastes. Should arrive any day now as it had to come from Europe. US based dealers didn't have what I wanted in stock or were ridiculously priced or both. 

Brad

"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain

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Spare nibs come with pen collecting territory. Early on in my collecting endeavor, I got a TWSBI vac 700 in a fine. Almost immediately after I got into stub nibs, I ordered a nib nib from one of the online retailers. After switching, I realized the potential of having spare nibs around. Now that I have been collecting for more than 10 years, I find my interest go in waves. There would be periods where I would be interested in one thing, and then it would swing to something else. Having spaces lying around without selling them immediately allows me to come back again to old favorites that I have abandoned, or have a revived interest in.

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I don't recall ever intentionally buying a spare nib but when I first started experimenting with repairing pens I ended up with a small collection of nibs, some of which are vintage Sheaffer nibs. I've lately begun swapping nibs out on some of my pens looking to improve the writing experience. My taste in nibs varies and right now I'm back to preferring fine nibs. At some point I know I'll want to write with an italic stub again and it's nice to be able to swap out a nib without spending money on another pen.

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2 hours ago, gerigo said:

Spare nibs come with pen collecting territory.

 

I agree, although my reading is that it isn't what @jchch1950 was really asking.

 

I think the crux of what he/she was asking is, if you want a particular pen body and a particular (presumably same-branded) nib on it out of a particular product line/ model, but that combination is not on offer at all for whatever reason, would you “agree to” spend more and acquire separate pieces to assemble your ideal pen within that limited scope, knowing you're paying more eyes wide open and will end up with ‘spare’ components you don't want or have a use for. Not so much about pen collecting, but about getting what you want, even if it's just one (particular) pen.

 

I frame it differently. As an individual consumer, user, hobbyist, whatever, it's up to you to decide what you ideally want; but manufacturers, and the industry as a whole, are not obliged to provide it on your ‘ideal’ or preferred terms just because you see yourself as being prepared to pay the asking price for the ‘basic’ model. It's not incumbent on them to make sure your wants are as well looked after as those they see as being ‘mainstream’, even if it make you feel marginalised or alienated, because you as an individual is not in a position to dictate what is, or ought to be, mainstream. It's not a matter of belittling anyone, but simply observing relationship dynamics, and seeing no good reason to be more ‘inclusive’ if it doesn't increase the manufacturers' and retailers' profit margins or otherwise serve their best business interests. That's assuming what you want is not so in line with what other hobbyists globally want, such that you have the benefit of critical mass.

 

Moving on from there, the formulation becomes: would you rather pay more and get exactly the product you ideally want (but nothing else); or would you rather pay more in return for two separate retail products in order to assemble what you ideally want, and end up with one or more spare parts in a drawer (or garbage bin)? Paying less than that is not an option that others are obliged to offer you. Can you “agree to” their terms in order to get material satisfaction for yourself, knowing that you've had to make a compromise psychologically; or would you refuse and opt for a “lose-lose” outcome, such that if the manufacturer or industry will not offer you what you want on your terms, you'd rather stay dissatisfied just to make a point that it won't get your money until it “comes to the table” or “plays ball” as if you're a force to reckon with?

 

For me, if I'm not in control of the total spend I must part with to secure exactly what I want, then I'd rather end up with spare parts (for which I may have no foreseeable use) than without for that expense.

 

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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There are many ways to skin a cat.

 

I have sometimes bought a pen and spare nib just to save in cost. Yep! Sometimes you find the pen with a "standard" nib (say, M) at a much lower price than the same pen with a nib you like but is not so common (say EF). And when you factor in costs, it makes more sense to get the cheaper one and a replacement nib than the one with the correct nib.

 

Other times, it was a matter of wanting to have several nibs for the same pen (say an EF, M and 1.1mm stub) to play with.

 

And yet, some times I couldn't find the pen with the nib I wanted, only the "standard" (usually M) and had no other option but to also get the extra nib.

 

Other possibilities have already been described. Point is, in answer to the OP, why not?

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2 hours ago, txomsy said:

There are many ways to skin a cat.

 

I have sometimes bought a pen and spare nib just to save in cost. Yep! Sometimes you find the pen with a "standard" nib (say, M) at a much lower price than the same pen with a nib you like but is not so common (say EF). And when you factor in costs, it makes more sense to get the cheaper one and a replacement nib than the one with the correct nib.

 

Other times, it was a matter of wanting to have several nibs for the same pen (say an EF, M and 1.1mm stub) to play with.

 

And yet, some times I couldn't find the pen with the nib I wanted, only the "standard" (usually M) and had no other option but to also get the extra nib.

 

Other possibilities have already been described. Point is, in answer to the OP, why not?

I've done this a couple of times. It is also usually a lot cheaper to buy the spare nib (steel ones at least) on the same order to avoid paying shipping again, even if you end up with more nibs than you need.

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On 4/20/2022 at 11:54 AM, SpecTP said:

I don't usually opt for a spare nib, but I might opt for a second nib with a different size. I usually order EF nibs, but I did opt for a second B nib when I ordered my Santini pen.

How do order a second nib from them? I can't seem to find it on their site. What do they charge for that?

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39 minutes ago, CoolBreeze said:

How do order a second nib from them? I can't seem to find it on their site. What do they charge for that?

 

they offer a second nib with the drop down menu option at the bottom past the menu option to pick the pen.

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6 hours ago, CoolBreeze said:

How do order a second nib from them? I can't seem to find it on their site.

 

https://www.santini-italia.com/faqs.html

Quote

I want to buy an extra nib for my pen.

 

If you are interested in buying an extra nib for your pen please use ...

 

 

6 hours ago, CoolBreeze said:

What do they charge for that?

 

That depends on what exactly you want to add.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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