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'Posting' nibs on Chinese pens. Another name?


AmandaW
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Are there any Chinese pens that have a posting nib (ie curved down) like the Pilot? Are there other names for that style of nib that should be searching?

It's all about the greys...

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Not that I'm aware.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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I know there used to be a few ( not quite the same as Pilot's ) in some vintage models but not any current ones , and likely cause there is no need of such , if any Chinese fountain pen hobbyist / user want XXF , they would today go for the Bladed Edge Grind nib in the defined triangular or heart profile , that would give them a pointy finely defined tip where they can laid down a fine fine fine line , that is due to the fact that the home language writing typically in quasi calligraphy / semi cursive form require using the pen almost vertically vs the typical angles as in Latin based Cursive , or they would use a more vintage style narrow profiled round off grind( like turning your typical western medium or fine 90 degree sideways and slim it further )

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An alternative name for a curved-down nib is a "Concord".

 

The Anglo-French airliner that the nib name references was  "Concorde" in France, and "Concord" in UK. It was so very slim and pointy that it needed to bend its nose down for pilot visibility on take-off and landing.

 

Scroll down to the ninth nib on this page.....

https://andersonpens.com/sailor-bespoke-nib-sizes/

 

And a full-size Concorde with its nib/nose tilted down...

https://www.alamy.com/concorde-an-air-france-concorde-landing-at-le-bourget-airport-paris-image1287571.html

 

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