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Low pH- & mid-pH soil hydrangea inks


Audrey T
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Hydrangea (Birmingham) vs Himeajisai “Hydrangea” (Kobe #57) FP inks

 

The Birmingham version goes on a greyish blue but dries to a violet-periwinkle. Both very pretty.

 

 

 

1396988068_Hydrangea.x.2.BirminghamKobe_on.Clairefontaine.1_18_2022_AT.thumb.jpg.80db387e4f191bb74abbfb15df9851f4.jpg

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Those look both like pretty nice inks. Specially the Kobe one.

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Just now, txomsy said:

Those look both like pretty nice inks. Specially the Kobe one.

I too am especially partial to that one.

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Recently I've been obsessed with the color 

Perano

which i found out is similar to the color of hydrangeas and with research led me to Pilot Iroshizuku アジサイ Ajisai Hydrangea
 
So perhaps that is another ink flower candidate!
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36 minutes ago, peroride said:

Recently I've been obsessed with the color 

Perano

which i found out is similar to the color of hydrangeas and with research led me to Pilot Iroshizuku アジサイ Ajisai Hydrangea
 
So perhaps that is another ink flower candidate!

That's a new term for me -- thank you!

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1 hour ago, yazeh said:

Funny none of the capture the beauty of hydrangea :)

I do like the color range you can see in a swab, though -- a little bit floral 😉

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2 minutes ago, Audrey T said:

I do like the color range you can see in a swab, though -- a little bit floral 😉

Exactly :)

 

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The hydrangeas in Georgia (USA), which is where I spent most of my life and where they are pretty ubiquitous, are predominantly soft, pastel colors, e. g. blues tend towards powder blue or baby blue. That Perano color is another good example of a common hydrangea color there. We call them 'wild hydrangeas'. I have seen many other kinds with deep colors, of course, but, I automatically associate 'hydrangea' with soft colors. 

Script nib for writing screenplays. • Fine nib for my best writing. • Extra fine for my *very* best writing. • Medium for requesting a séance. • Bold for adventure stories. • Manifold for many various types of writing. • Coarse for indignant letters. • Oblique for making a point in a roundabout way. • Italic when I'm inclined. • Stub for when I intend to leave a manuscript unfinis

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1 hour ago, PithyProlix said:

I automatically associate 'hydrangea' with soft colors

Mee too😀

 

and in a different mindset, infinitely hot, like neuron star hot ! 🥵

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1 hour ago, PithyProlix said:

The hydrangeas in Georgia (USA), which is where I spent most of my life and where they are pretty ubiquitous, are predominantly soft, pastel colors, e. g. blues tend towards powder blue or baby blue. That Perano color is another good example of a common hydrangea color there. We call them 'wild hydrangeas'. I have seen many other kinds with deep colors, of course, but, I automatically associate 'hydrangea' with soft colors. 

I get that. The thing with hydrangeas is that there is such a wide range of colour in a single flower, that can go from powder blue to  pastel violet. And that's near impossible to capture.....

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Thank you @Audrey T for this comparison.

 

18 hours ago, Audrey T said:

Hydrangea (Birmingham) vs Himeajisai “Hydrangea” (Kobe #57) FP inks

The Birmingham version looks like a very nice blue in the swab but is almost a grey-blue in the writing. What is your impression about how much ink is needed to force the blue to become dominant?

One life!

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8 minutes ago, InesF said:

Thank you @Audrey T for this comparison.

 

The Birmingham version looks like a very nice blue in the swab but is almost a grey-blue in the writing. What is your impression about how much ink is needed to force the blue to become dominant?

I wouldn't call it a blue-grey IRL (in case it might look that way in the photo); it's got more of a violet tone. But let me try it later with a different pen, to see what happens.

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1 hour ago, Audrey T said:

I wouldn't call it a blue-grey IRL (in case it might look that way in the photo); it's got more of a violet tone. But let me try it later with a different pen, to see what happens.

It depends in part on the paper, I think, but you're right, it does seem to have more grey in it than I realized. I guess I would call it more lavender than violet (with some of that "half-mourning" feel that ushers in some grey). I find most Birmingham inks pretty desaturated, so that affects my perception of the color. In a minute I'll post a handwriting sample (medium + 1.1 mm stub), and also a photo of the rinse water so that you can see the blue base.

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1 hour ago, Audrey T said:

I wouldn't call it a blue-grey IRL (in case it might look that way in the photo); it's got more of a violet tone. But let me try it later with a different pen, to see what happens.

Birmingham's Hydrangea in two different nibs and in water. (Light is bright artificial light.)

 

 

Hydrangea.Birmingham.writing.samples.med&stub.AT.jpg

Hydrangea.Birmingham.rinse.water.AT.crop.jpg

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Thanks for this neat comparison. All of these inks resemble quite well the hydrangeas we have in the garden (well, at least during warmer seasons). Along with ajisai, I'd like to add on iroshi's ama-iro (which of course doesn't mean hydrangea, but does resemble our most abundant plants).

Life is too short to drink bad wine (Goethe)

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Someone recently sent me a note written with Birmingham’s Hydrangea ink, and it was a light blurple-lilac shade, much closer to the color on BPC’s website.  I tried to photograph it, however, the photo makes it look blue like AudreyT’s first example.  I’ll try to get it in a specialized light setup to see if I can  get a truer image.

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1 hour ago, Carrau said:

Someone recently sent me a note written with Birmingham’s Hydrangea ink, and it was a light blurple-lilac shade, much closer to the color on BPC’s website.  I tried to photograph it, however, the photo makes it look blue like AudreyT’s first example.  I’ll try to get it in a specialized light setup to see if I can  get a truer image.

It may depend in part on the paper -- and the size nib, too.

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No doubt!  It appears to have been written on Rhoda paper, with a relatively broad round nib.

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