Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Platinum Century 3776 Cap and Other differences


PotbellyPig
 Share

Recommended Posts

47 minutes ago, PotbellyPig said:

Is that a wetter ink or a dryer ink?  I know nothing about inks.  I’m still contemplating whether to get a UEF to complement my Sailor EF

 

This ink is completely new to me, bought to try with the new pen.  Diamine inks, in general, have a (very) good flow. All the reviews I have read for raw sienna indicate an average to good flow, so it’s certainly not a dry ink.  Control of the ink by the pen itself (I tried several different inks this morning) is awesome.  No converter issues so far - all good.

 

Based on the little writing I have done so far, you will only need an EF; the UEF seems quite specialised, notwithstanding the Sailor EF being known as an extremely fine line nib.  (Never wanted a Sailor myself, somehow).

 

Sorry I can’t be of more help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 26
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • PotbellyPig

    10

  • A Smug Dill

    4

  • awa54

    3

  • Peter_H

    9

1 hour ago, Peter_H said:

 

Based on the little writing I have done so far, you will only need an EF; the UEF seems quite specialised, notwithstanding the Sailor EF being known as an extremely fine line nib.  (Never wanted a Sailor myself, somehow).

 

I was told before I bought it that writing with a Sailor EF is like writing with a sharp pencil.  I like the feel.  But there is a little too much ink going on the page and/or some line width spreading going on with the standard black ink cartridge.  I have been told to try the Kiwa-Guro pigment ink as it is supposed to keep very fine lines thin.  This is just my perception.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll chime in here as someone who has used many fine and extra fine nibs in vintage Japanese pens...

 

First off, my experience is mostly with older pens that are usually unmarked as to nib width, however the *tipping* widths are easily seen and will clue an experienced user in on what to expect as far as *potential* finest line width.

 

So, here goes:  never mind the fractional millimeter width increments between F, EF, XF/UEF nib tipping, your biggest differences between these three (assuming the fine nibs in question are typical Japanese widths) is going to be how wet the feed is, how well your chosen ink flows, how much that ink feathers or spreads and the properties of the paper you're writing on.

 

I have wet writing nibs that feature microscopic tipping, yet write the equivalent of a fine and fines with stingy inkflow that wind up presenting as EF/XF when written on smoothly finished, bleed resistant papers. All of these subtleties disappear when you write on (most) cheap note paper, since it soaks the ink into the fibers, effectively spreading your lines as far as the pens inkflow allows. A heavy hand with an extremely fine nib can also break fibers in the surface of high quality papers and lead to the same sort of line spread as you get with more porous paper.

 

Remember also, that individual pens of the same stated nib size, even within a brand will vary in inkflow, as well as measured tipping width and tine gap. The big three Japanese makers have great QC, but even they show occasional sample variation!

 

I guess the upshot of all this, is that I'd suggest choosing pens that you like the look and feel of, inks that you enjoy the colors of and a tip size that won't cause trouble if you have to use it on average paper (so probably no UEF), then write with them and enjoy your pens, rather than obsessing over EF vs. UEF, or the difference between a good screw cap vs. the BEST screw cap. Once you have some time living with your early FP choices, your experiences will guide you to the next ones and eventually you may even find The One pen that makes you happiest, but don't expect that any amount of research will actually net you "The One" on the first few tries ...or if it does, quick, go play the lotto, before your incredible luck is all used up ;)

 

As to Kiwaguro vs. "standard" Sailor black (dye based formula), the standard black is more "watery" and with most papers will spread very slightly more than the nano/pigment based Sailor inks, but it's not a huge difference on good paper like Rhodia.

Maybe try a lighter hand, you might be inadvertently spreading the tines to allow more inkflow, or crushing/scraping the surface of the paper, so that ink soaks into the sizing or fibers more (or sizing residue may be building up on the nib tip, giving a wider, sloppier line).

It's easy to forget how little pressure a fountain pen requires to write well, especially if you also use paste/grease based ink ballpoints regularly.

 

 

David-

 

So many restoration projects...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, awa54 said:

I'll chime in here as someone who has used many fine and extra fine nibs in vintage Japanese pens...

 

Good advice, borne of long experience.  Kudos.

 

So, I have now inked my #3776 (aka “The One”) with the lovely Diamine Monboddo’s Hat.  It’s a winning combination, likely to be [semi-] permanent.

 

The gold-trim c/c for this pen (bought separately) is lovely - so smooth and well-fitting.  This is turning out to be great fun!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Monboddo's Hat is a little too dark to qualify as my favorite purple, but today I'm wielding a Rotring 700 (stealth MB Noblesse Oblige) filled with Diamine Billberry.

 

I personally wouldn't want a "One Pen to Rule them All", since IMO, variety is the spice of life... though a smooth, soft fine or EF, in a mid-sized resin barrel is my default for writing ease.

 

My only owned 3776 Plats are an early production (BHR feed) and current production Gathered, they're both slip caps, both excellent writers and both have only average dry-out resistance, with the newer one being slightly more prone to drying over a week or more of disuse. Needless to say, neither is close to being The One, but I like the barrel design and feel in hand, so they stay!

 

I'd like to eventually find a nice ebonite feed, black resin/GT model, but haven't seen one at the right price recently :(

David-

 

So many restoration projects...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/20/2021 at 9:10 PM, awa54 said:

Monboddo's Hat is a little too dark to qualify as my favorite purple, but today I'm wielding a Rotring 700 (stealth MB Noblesse Oblige) filled with Diamine Billberry.

 

Not tried Bilberry; I tend to go for saturated colours since these always look good with an EF line.  So, for example, Raw Sienna is a bit “under” for me - I may go back to Macassar.

 

 

 

On 10/20/2021 at 9:10 PM, awa54 said:

I personally wouldn't want a "One Pen to Rule them All", since IMO, variety is the spice of life... though a smooth, soft fine or EF, in a mid-sized resin barrel is my default for writing ease.

 

Of course, everyone is different, thank goodness.  For me, finding “The One” does not mean neglecting my other pens.  Indeed, the way thing are organised here, my FC Hexo (inked in Obsidian) will usually get more paper time than my 3776 (inked in Monboddo’s Hat).  All my pens are, at a minimum, “good” writers - it is just that my Platinum is exceptional!  Doesn’t stop me enjoying the feel of a Waterman or a LAMY in my hand, though.  The only real difference now is that I no longer have an urge to actively expand my small collection.  Of course, if I stumble across something, that may be different but FOMO and seeking the next “big thing” have gone.  Won’t stop me browsing pens, of course - that is fun as well!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Peter_H said:

 

Not tried Bilberry; I tend to go for saturated colours since these always look good with an EF line.  So, for example, Raw Sienna is a bit “under” for me - I may go back to Macassar.

 

 

 

Billberry is a nicely saturated purple-blue, just not as deep and dark as Monboddo's

Sort of like a purple-dominant Sargasso Sea

 

It's not that I don't use very dark colors, I just like ones with more brightness to show that saturation off better

David-

 

So many restoration projects...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      37958
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      31099
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. jar
      jar
      26101
    5. wimg
      wimg
      25602
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Texas42
      Dang. You are a great friend!   One comment as a relative newcomer would be within the cleaning section: issues/differences in cleaning vacuum filler, piston filler in addition to cartridge/converter. I just cleaned out my Pilot 823 and while it wasn't particularly difficult I was a little paranoid about the drops of water that I could not get out. Perhaps this is something you are already including.   Anyway, great project and very thoughtful of you. I know it's a project fo
    • Splat
      Ah Ruaidhri ya wee heid banger, you do indeed have an Irishman’s way wid dose words now. I’ll be from outer Aberdeenshire up in the blizzard riven braes of the Grampians.  Amateur medicine and surgery is it? Well what noble aspirations you do possess, we need to encourage such noble experimentations.  I pondered on leaving my own battered shell to science, but, until I read your pearls of wisdom and lament, I had comedown on the side of leaving my body to Findus frozen foods.  However, your rema
    • austollie
      Hi Smug Dill,   Nice project.  If it were me, I'd cover stuff like: - nib types available, i.e. styles, materials (SS vs gold), flex vs nails; - filling systems (I love the "thingie" comment) and how once can use them in practice (e.g. fill cartridges with a syringe); - pen body materials and their consequences (pen not balanced of too heavy and big for the hand); - and, whilst you've made it clear that you do not like vintage pens, a discussion of these beyond "I d
    • A Smug Dill
      Thanks for your input! Yes, not putting wood in the list of body materials warranting a mention was an oversight. I love pens with wooden bodies, but my main concern, or chagrin, is that I have not come across a wooden-bodied pen with a wooden cap that seals well. Actually, there is one, but it isn't really wood per se: the Pilot Custom Kaede's maple body is resin impregnated. All other wooden pens I have can dry out while capped and undisturbed; that includes several Platinum #3776 models.
    • amk
      That looks pretty good. You might want to add wood as a material (with its weakness of staining) and mention urushi. And under ergonomic considerations, the size of section (slender pens vs chunky pens), and shape of section, and 'disturbances' such as the Lamy 2000 'ears' and Pilot Capless clip getting in the way might be worth mentioning. Also possibly a general section on things you can do yourself with a bit of care, with a bit of practice, and things that are strictly "don't try this a
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Files

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. 13R14N
      13R14N
      (55 years old)
    2. ACX
      ACX
      (65 years old)
    3. Baenlynn
      Baenlynn
      (38 years old)
    4. beardedpens
      beardedpens
      (27 years old)
    5. Behike54
      Behike54





×
×
  • Create New...