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Jinhao 100 Centennial nib question


Peter_H
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I recently ordered a Jinhao 100 Centennial from China, which should be arriving imminently.  I realised - too late! - that the EF nib I have specified is not an original Jinhao nib.  So, assuming I am not happy with it:

 

- anyone know what make/style of nib I am likely to get?

- can it easily be replaced with a “better” EF nib?

- if, so what would you recommend?

 

I recall reading that there was a switch from #5 to #6 nibs recently for this design, but I don’t normally mess with my pens these days, so any detailed advice would be welcome.  A fine line is always my clear preference.

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My pen has now turned up and I’m delighted.  The EF nib is actually a Kaigelu, which not only looks good but writes beautifully with the Diamine Woodland Green currently in the piston filler.  A well made, nicely balanced, reliable (I think) writer. 🙂

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I don't have that pen but good to hear you like the nib your pen came with. If your pen came with a #6 nib, that'll give you many options if you later still wish to experiment with other nibs since I've seen several replacement nibs in that size.

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  • 1 month later...

I don't know if Jinhao do make a EF nib in #6 size. I think that their usual nib that also comes on the X450 & 750 is also used in the Centennial.

The difference is merely a micro-thin layer of gold-plating.

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  • 6 months later...
On 11/6/2021 at 3:24 PM, Dip n Scratch said:

The difference is merely a micro-thin layer of gold-plating.

 

Micro-thin, indeed!  The whole lot has come off this nib, without any obvious excess friction (cleaning, polishing). ☹️

 

Maybe it was a duff coating or perhaps it does not like Diamine Woodland Green?  There are no practical consequences, it just looks a bit boring.  I fitted an identical nib to a Moonman T1 a while ago and that has been fine.  Monboddo’s Hat is inking that one, also from Diamine.  Strange.

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17 minutes ago, Peter_H said:

Micro-thin, indeed!  The whole lot has come off this nib, without any obvious excess friction (cleaning, polishing). ☹️

 

It happens. I've even had gold-plating come off Kaigelu, Platinum, Pelikan steel nibs in time, so I certainly don't expect any better from Chinese brands aimed largely at the budget end of the fountain pen market.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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On 5/30/2022 at 12:01 PM, A Smug Dill said:

 

It happens. I've even had gold-plating come off Kaigelu, Platinum, Pelikan steel nibs in time, so I certainly don't expect any better from Chinese brands aimed largely at the budget end of the fountain pen market.

 

Interesting.  My old Sheaffer nib lasted for decades, with the gold plating in apparently perfect condition.  The Jinhao 100 Centennial under consideration sported a Kaigelu #6 EF nib, as supplied with the pen, not a Jinhao one.  I happened to subsequently buy 3 of these bare nibs very cheaply and have fitted one to my Moonman - still seems fine.

 

Back in the day, I was professionally involved with thin film technology for quite a while.  That was for integrated circuits, using vacuum sputtering or chemical vapor deposition.  I suspect that pen nib makers use (electro)chemical deposition methods and may not prepare the surfaces especially carefully.  Then again, these coatings are ultimately only a few atoms thick, so not exactly hard wearing!

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  • 4 weeks later...

“Problem” solved!

 

Well, not really a problem, more of an irritation.  Upgraded to a #6 Bock EF.  Nice nib; kept the original feed, as the Bock would have needed surgery to fit the Jinhao housing and converter.  Works well and is very smooth.

 

273413406_Bock1.thumb.jpg.e48acaebf60e726b14b3f63f4b63e708.jpg

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The Jinhao nib used to be a medium that was on the broad side compared to the European makers. There was only that, take it or leave it.

Happily they seem to be offering something better as a recent purchase of a X450 showed. I had no need of changing the OE nib supplied with the pen, which is a nice discovery.

The Jinhao 100 as a more 'upmarket' pen ought to have an actual choice of tip width.

Personally I would check with the seller & move on if they can't supply what you want.

You can get three Kaigelu EF nibs  very cheaply

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1 hour ago, Dip n Scratch said:

The Jinhao nib used to be a medium that was on the broad side compared to the European makers. There was only that, take it or leave it.

….

You can get three Kaigelu EF nibs  very cheaply

 

When I purchased my 100 Centennial, Jinhao offered F,M,B but the seller also offered EF - which turned out to be a Kaigelu.  This wrote rather nicely, but the bicoloured gold coating soon came off the nib (see above).  Coincidentally, I had ordered three Kaigelu EF nibs, very cheaply, (from China) to swap out a Moonman F nib I disliked.  Although I could have fitted one of the remaining two, I got the Bock instead (to see if their reputation was warranted).  Not very different in terms of line width, flow or smoothness, but somehow it seems easier to write with.  Although both are number 6 nibs, the Bock is a little wider and the shape seems to work slightly better for my extended writing.  It looks good, too!

 

Now all of my 10 fountain pens have different nibs, which was the original aim.

 

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27 minutes ago, mke said:

As the typical coatings are micrometers, it must have been nano.

 

😁😂 Since Ångstroms are non-SI, I suppose so!  Actually, I suspect poor surface preparation/contamination, but have swapped my kitchen paper towels for face tissues when removing excess ink after filling, as an obvious precaution.

 

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