Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

WRITING ON WRITING MATERIALS


Auntor
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 5
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • AAAndrew

    1

  • ASCIIaardvark

    1

  • Auntor

    4

A very ambitious, but also fascinating topic. This is an opportunity to do some solid research. Keep track of your sources, where you get your information. And don't be afraid of going back and revising as you learn more. All of us doing historical research learn more as we go along, and earlier statements may need to be changed as better information comes along. Not all sources on the internet are equally good. 😁

 

When you get to the 19th-century, be sure and check out my site thesteelpen.com. There's a very tiny amount related to the UK, the first place steel pens were made on an industrial scale, with much more on the US steel pen industry. 

 

If you have questions about steel pens, and the transition from quill to steel, feel free to reach out and ask. 

 

Good luck!

 

Andrew

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, AAAndrew said:

A very ambitious, but also fascinating topic. This is an opportunity to do some solid research. Keep track of your sources, where you get your information. And don't be afraid of going back and revising as you learn more. All of us doing historical research learn more as we go along, and earlier statements may need to be changed as better information comes along. Not all sources on the internet are equally good. 😁

 

When you get to the 19th-century, be sure and check out my site thesteelpen.com. There's a very tiny amount related to the UK, the first place steel pens were made on an industrial scale, with much more on the US steel pen industry. 

 

If you have questions about steel pens, and the transition from quill to steel, feel free to reach out and ask. 

 

Good luck!

 

Andrew

Thank you very much for your compliments and guidance,  Mr. Andrew.

You have a lovely website. It is a really helpful source of reference for my project.

Thanks again, 

Antar Biswas 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have also read somewhere about lead-based inks as well

 

I recall reading this too, but that's a vague citation... a Google search top result is a Smithsonian Magazine article about this, if you want to add a more trusted reference to lend your write-up more verisimilitude.

 

I, like many here, am a fan of writing materials & their history. So I'm interested where you're going with the series -- are you going to cover how writing systems evolved in many places like China & Rapanui (maybe), or are you tracing the origins of the commonly used tools of today (pen, brush, reed, etc), or something else as a unifying theme?

 

Do please post in this thread when you publish your next article :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, ASCIIaardvark said:

I recall reading this too, but that's a vague citation... a Google search top result is a Smithsonian Magazine article about this, if you want to add a more trusted reference to lend your write-up more verisimilitude.

Thank you for sending the reference. I will add this to the bibliography at the end of the series. And,I was also planning to write an article  on various ink recipes in the future. So it will surely help.

 

21 minutes ago, ASCIIaardvark said:

are you going to cover how writing systems evolved in many places like China & Rapanui (maybe), or are you tracing the origins of the commonly used tools of today (pen, brush, reed, etc), or something else as a unifying theme?

Yes, in fact,  I am dedicating the second part on writing materials evolved in the orient (china and indian subcontinent) and in mesoamerica (though I was thinking of the mayans).

 

32 minutes ago, ASCIIaardvark said:

Do please post in this thread when you publish your next article :)

I shall and possibly tomorrow itself.

 

Best wishes, 

Antar Biswas 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      37940
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      31089
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. jar
      jar
      26101
    5. wimg
      wimg
      25602
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Splat
      Ah Ruaidhri ya wee heid banger, you do indeed have an Irishman’s way wid dose words now. I’ll be from outer Aberdeenshire up in the blizzard riven braes of the Grampians.  Amateur medicine and surgery is it? Well what noble aspirations you do possess, we need to encourage such noble experimentations.  I pondered on leaving my own battered shell to science, but, until I read your pearls of wisdom and lament, I had comedown on the side of leaving my body to Findus frozen foods.  However, your rema
    • austollie
      Hi Smug Dill,   Nice project.  If it were me, I'd cover stuff like: - nib types available, i.e. styles, materials (SS vs gold), flex vs nails; - filling systems (I love the "thingie" comment) and how once can use them in practice (e.g. fill cartridges with a syringe); - pen body materials and their consequences (pen not balanced of too heavy and big for the hand); - and, whilst you've made it clear that you do not like vintage pens, a discussion of these beyond "I d
    • A Smug Dill
      Thanks for your input! Yes, not putting wood in the list of body materials warranting a mention was an oversight. I love pens with wooden bodies, but my main concern, or chagrin, is that I have not come across a wooden-bodied pen with a wooden cap that seals well. Actually, there is one, but it isn't really wood per se: the Pilot Custom Kaede's maple body is resin impregnated. All other wooden pens I have can dry out while capped and undisturbed; that includes several Platinum #3776 models.
    • amk
      That looks pretty good. You might want to add wood as a material (with its weakness of staining) and mention urushi. And under ergonomic considerations, the size of section (slender pens vs chunky pens), and shape of section, and 'disturbances' such as the Lamy 2000 'ears' and Pilot Capless clip getting in the way might be worth mentioning. Also possibly a general section on things you can do yourself with a bit of care, with a bit of practice, and things that are strictly "don't try this a
    • Detman101
      Hahaha...this is brilliantly funny! 🤣 I did not know about this section of the site...what gem!  
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Files

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. abdcolvinian
      abdcolvinian
      (29 years old)
    2. AndyN
      AndyN
      (59 years old)
    3. andyr7
      andyr7
      (70 years old)
    4. barefeetz
      barefeetz
    5. berryns
      berryns
      (38 years old)





×
×
  • Create New...