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Inks that won't stain urushi sections



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MartinPauli

As mentioned above Urushi is resistant to all known acids and alkalis, as well as water and temperatures up to 300 degrees celsius.

 

But the substrate the urushi is applied on can be a problem. Applied properly on Ebonite there is no propblem. If urushi is applied on Brass as many pens are, you have to care for the brass. Ultrasonic and warm water is ok. For serious cases you can drop the section with nib int a glass jar filled with Acetone and put it into the Ultrasonic bath

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Nurmister
1 hour ago, MartinPauli said:

As mentioned above Urushi is resistant to all known acids and alkalis, as well as water and temperatures up to 300 degrees celsius.

 

But the substrate the urushi is applied on can be a problem. Applied properly on Ebonite there is no propblem. If urushi is applied on Brass as many pens are, you have to care for the brass. Ultrasonic and warm water is ok. For serious cases you can drop the section with nib int a glass jar filled with Acetone and put it into the Ultrasonic bath

 

This is very interesting: I never considered the substrate as hindering or allowing certain cleaning to be applied.

 

There was another thread in which a materials science student recommended Titanium as a substrate for urushi, given its corrosion resistance: would it be a better substrate?  Or are there other considerations? I always wondered why Namiki chose brass for the Yukari Royale.

 

The topside of a nib is its face, the underside its soul (user readytotalk)

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MartinPauli

I assume for brass and other metals used for urushi pens there are no problems wwith watche, Spiritus or Acetone and Ultrasonic. Most urushi works are executed on a wooden base.

When the urushi has not completely sealed the wooden core, the wood can react to water and temperature and eventually crack the lacquer when expanding or shrinking. For screen printed Maki-e I would not take any responsibility and recommend not more than warm water. screen printed urushi is mostly mixed or soluted with chemicals or oils and therefore not as resistant as pure urushi

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Stewiesdad
9 hours ago, MartinPauli said:

As mentioned above Urushi is resistant to all known acids and alkalis, as well as water and temperatures up to 300 degrees celsius.

 

But the substrate the urushi is applied on can be a problem. Applied properly on Ebonite there is no propblem. If urushi is applied on Brass as many pens are, you have to care for the brass. Ultrasonic and warm water is ok. For serious cases you can drop the section with nib int a glass jar filled with Acetone and put it into the Ultrasonic bath

Thank you, that puts my mind at ease. I might still be hesitant about using my ultrasonic cleaner, for the ebonite component underneath the urushi, but soaking the nib unit for a few hours makes a huge difference in cleaning. So basically, try and not use an urushi pen in sunlight seems the be the main concern? But would, say, an afternoon spent writing at an outdoor café on a sunny day potentially damage the urushi? 

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jandrese
2 hours ago, Stewiesdad said:

Thank you, that puts my mind at ease. I might still be hesitant about using my ultrasonic cleaner, for the ebonite component underneath the urushi, but soaking the nib unit for a few hours makes a huge difference in cleaning. So basically, try and not use an urushi pen in sunlight seems the be the main concern? But would, say, an afternoon spent writing at an outdoor café on a sunny day potentially damage the urushi? 

I used to ultrasonically clean my nibs/feeds/sections. There is not much benefit over flushing unless, and still kind of not really, pigment inks, iron gall inks, or something else has clogged the ink channels in the feed. 

 

Regarding using urushi pens outside, sunny or not (UV penetrates clouds), I do hesitate, but have done it. UV is kryptonite to urushi. Of course, it will not disintegrate immediately, it's not made out of vampire stuff, but I suppose over time it could damage or at least discolor the surface. That said, many things that are used outside in Japan are painted with urushi, even entire temples. "Damage" due to honest use is valued in Japan and urushi can be repaired more or less. Your pens, your choice.

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Stewiesdad
17 minutes ago, jandrese said:

I used to ultrasonically clean my nibs/feeds/sections. There is not much benefit over flushing unless, and still kind of not really, pigment inks, iron gall inks, or something else has clogged the ink channels in the feed. 

 

Regarding using urushi pens outside, sunny or not (UV penetrates clouds), I do hesitate, but have done it. UV is kryptonite to urushi. Of course, it will not disintegrate immediately, it's not made out of vampire stuff, but I suppose over time it could damage or at least discolor the surface. That said, many things that are used outside in Japan are painted with urushi, even entire temples. "Damage" due to honest use is valued in Japan and urushi can be repaired more or less. Your pens, your choice.

Thank you, well put. I like to use my pens and not baby them. Well, I do in that I am careful with them, but they are still tools to be used. Likely after reading the various answers,  I will treat the urushi ones the same as the resin ones. 

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Tinjapan

Urushi dishes, including sake cups and soup bowls are readily available and we have many in our household.  Water is NOT poison for urushi.  I would not put my urushi pens in my ultrasonic cleaner though. It may be safe but I”ll someone else try it with their pens.  

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MartinPauli

Think about, in Japan and other countries in Asia almost everthing was lacquered either protected or decorated with urushi. Soup bowls, Palanquins, fishing rods, Samurai armors, sword sheeth (Saya), hundreds of years old construction and decorations in temples and shrines and dry lacquer sculptures, water pipes and water cisterns inside, Suzuribako, Inrô, instruments, tea utensils. There are things made by masters to be preserved but the mayority of "urushimono" to be used in daily life with care. In Japan there is a term "Yô no Bi" meaning "Beauty through use". A old object, well treated can become  even more beautiful. Important term in Japan in valuing things is also "Jidai" age of things. Negor lacquer represents Yô no Bi the best

Negoro-Heishi.jpg

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      Even so, you'd end up with a fragmented list, and it becomes an O(N²) process for each prospective requestor to check what is available: effectively recreate the list of currently active servers (without any reliable up-to-date info upfront about the inks and number of samples on offer in the thread) from the sequential list of posts, which may be spread over two or even more pages, and then query each server independently to check what is currently on offer.   It comes down to not hav
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