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Front section stuck. Rubber cement?


JamesEdward
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Dear all, 

 

I got a 30s Parker Duofold Canada from a second-hand seller the other day. It seems someone has glued the front section in place. 

The feed was clogged with what I can only describe as malleable white-ish school eraser material. This is my pointer to assume it is rubber cement, although I have never seen or used the stuff. I was able to remove it with a toothpick. 

 

If a previous owner used this same material to glue the front section in place (some appears to be visible between the tiny space between barrel and front section) how would you recommend trying to loosen the front section? Pen has been in cold water for 3 days, some soap added. Had 5 runs in ultrasonic barn. One run of hot water, probably around 40 Celsius (104 F). I didn't dare hotter because of the celluloid.

 

Blind cap, feed and nib have been removed. No sac remnants, button and pressure bar MIA. 

 

Many thanks for your effort and help! 

Edited by JamesEdward
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Have you tried dry heat?  That would be my first course of action, a hair dryer will work in a pinch.

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I haven't yet. Thanks! Are there any guidelines to keep in mind, concerning duration, distance from nozzle, etc.?

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Parker sealed the sections on these pens with a rosin based thread sealant.  If the section hasn't been removed for a long time, it can be difficult to remove.    Gentle heat, and gentle persistent torque to unscrew are prescribed.

 

You might want to read this article that I wrote some time ago.  I think it'll help understand the combination of heat, pressure, and how to know what is enough and what is too much.

 

Note that when you reinstall the section, you should seal the threads.  Don't use shellac.  Shellac sets up and hardens.  Silicone grease lubricates the threads making it easy to over tighten, and any "sealing" action is because of the hydrophobic  properties of the grease.  I recommend, and use, a rosin based thread sealant.

 

I think that the white material may be white paint, which we see used in fountain pens, and which will clog the feed worse than a bad head cold.  Expect to have to knock the nib and feed out.  Use Higgins pen cleaner, or better yet Koh-I-Noor RapidoEze pen cleaner to get it out of the nib and feed.  Expect to pick it out using  shim stock and and maybe a brass detail brush.

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Heavens! Big big thank you for the advice. There are a lot of brands you mention that won't be easy to get in the Netherlands, I think. I will have a look of course! 

 

Is there someplace I could read about the importance of resealing the thread section? Perhaps also on a good product to do this with? 

 

Fortunately, I was able to wiggle out nib and  feed relatively easily with some anti slip mat in my hand. The feed was rife with the inky white gunk, but I got most of it out with a wooden toothpick. Still have to see how the flow is though...

 

Thanks again for your help!

 

Edit: found your post on Why use sealant? from 2018. Perfectly clear! 

Edited by JamesEdward
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I sell a rosin based thread sealant, and it's what I use in the shop.  Ingredients just ordered to make a fresh batch.  You can contact me back channel if you want more information.

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5 minutes ago, Ron Z said:

I sell a rosin based thread sealant, and it's what I use in the shop.  Ingredients just ordered to make a fresh batch.  You can contact me back channel if you want more information.

Thanks a million! 

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Just to let you know that the gentle heat, gentle torque worked perfectly! Used a hair dryer, heated to temperature which felt as "could hold for 2-3 seconds" and used anti slip to gently apply torque. Front section came out no fuss. It is not threaded though. Still use thread sealant when reassembling? 

 

Putting it down for the day to further inspect tomorrow. Many thanks for your help! 

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Check the fit.  Use a little heat going in as you did getting it out to relax the material and help to prevent cracks in the barrel   If it's snug enough that it doesn't shift easily or turn too easily, just put it in.  If it's a little tight, just a small dab of shellac in a spot on the section before you insert should be sufficient.  If loose, put a layer of shellac on the section, let it dry for several hours, and then use heat to soften it a bit while inserting the section in the barrel.

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Fit is pretty great. Section fits in snuggly, without any issue. Very happy with it!

 

Would you recommend discussing another issue with this pen in a new topic? I cannot get the nib to go into the section far enough. To such an extent even, that it hits the top of the cap. The nib only goes into the front section for about 2 millimetres I think. 

 

Is this a common problem, possibly? 

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If the nib and feed came out of the section, they will go back in.  I find it helpful to work with a lamp overhead, and a sheet of white paper on the desk or bench.  Look down through the section with light reflecting up through it.  You will be able to see the impression left on the wall of the section by the nib.  Try to get the nib into the same spot when  you reassemble things.  It'll go in much more easily. 

 

A nib and feed in a vintage pen should be a very snug fit.  If it isn't the nib will tend to shift.  It often takes much more force than you anticipate to get things back together.  Support the feed by the shoulder, not the very end of the feed in either a drilled out block of wood, or a knockout block. 

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46 minutes ago, Ron Z said:

Support the feed by the shoulder, not the very end of the feed in either a drilled out block of wood, or a knockout block.

 

With respect to the block of wood/knockout block, do you mean the section?  

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Many thanks! I will try the method with overhead light and white work area. I must admit that I do not understand what "the shoulder of the feed" is, unfortunately.

 

My method so far was to line up feed and nib, take that in left hand and front section in right hand and slide into each other. Is there a better or more prefered way?

 

How far should the nib be shoved into the section? Maybe I can use the imprint on the nib as a reference? I would insert this nib as far as the bottom "F", just below "Canada". Is that the correct depth?

Parker Nib.jpeg

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