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New acquisition - Cross Peerless 125


Topcat666
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Recently acquired a Cross Peerless 125 in black F nib.

Sailor nib.

Excellent nib.

Writes very well.

The cap looks a bit big but so far that's the only criticism I could make.

At present, I can only say I am well impressed with it

I never would have looked at this pen or Cross as a brand but this was a suggestion by a member on another forum and a very good one too.

I'll have to learn to keep an open mind on pen brands and will look at Cross in the future.

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I love my Fine nibbed platinum Peeroless, (with gold furniture)  It has been my EDCwithin my bubble  during the pandemic.

I say it is my "best Sailor pen", both for writing pleasure and it's handiness and durability. Amazon's algorithmic chaos floated it into my hands at the beginning of this mess, thanks to Mall Watch here. 

 

I like platinum-plated Cross Townsends too, They are also tough, and easy to keep clean and bright.  

 

Cheers,

 

“It’s better to light a candle than curse the darkness

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  • 4 weeks later...

Yes, great pen.  During the pandemic I could not source a Sailor out of Japan after several months so got a Peerless 125 out of Europe with a Sailor Fine shipped to the US in 2 days for free.

 

 49835104996_8ad9d51a03_k.jpg[u

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  • 3 months later...

I have only just discovered the Cross Peerless 125 and the Sailor nib has proven to be a revelation. It is bringing me back to handwriting and is proving to be such a joy. I have acquired and used a number of fountain pens in the past but they never really 'clicked' until now. I thought to maybe buy a Sailor pen as well but these boards indicate that I may be getting the best experience with the Cross-Sailor hybrid. I have M and F nibs. Now that I'm hooked 🙄 I've started researching Pelikan as well. Any thoughts on how their nibs might compare with the M and F Sailor 18ct nib in the Peerless? (Also, that seems like a very odd colour for Cross to be calling 'titanium grey' - the pen at the top of the photo looks more brown/gold to me!)

Cross Peerless 125 MandFnib.jpeg

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/9/2021 at 7:04 AM, Chimera01 said:

I have only just discovered the Cross Peerless 125 and the Sailor nib has proven to be a revelation. It is bringing me back to handwriting and is proving to be such a joy. I have acquired and used a number of fountain pens in the past but they never really 'clicked' until now. I thought to maybe buy a Sailor pen as well but these boards indicate that I may be getting the best experience with the Cross-Sailor hybrid. I have M and F nibs. Now that I'm hooked 🙄 I've started researching Pelikan as well. Any thoughts on how their nibs might compare with the M and F Sailor 18ct nib in the Peerless? (Also, that seems like a very odd colour for Cross to be calling 'titanium grey' - the pen at the top of the photo looks more brown/gold to me!)

 

Pelikan will be smoother, wider line and wetter.

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Yes, I agree!  I find the Cross Peerless to be some of the finest pens made today.  Just absolute highest quality.  I now have two and have enjoyed both of them.  Some of my favorite pens.

 

Erick

 

Using right now:

Kaweco Dia2 "F" nib running Kaweco Blue

Eversharp Skyline "F" nib running Omas Sepia

Leonardo Officina Italiana "EF" nib running Noodler's Cayenne

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17 hours ago, Tseg said:

Pelikan will be smoother, wider line and wetter.

Hello. Thank you for your reply. I really like my Cross Peerless 125 Medium nibs (the Sailor nibs). I also have an S T Dupont M nib that I find quite pleasurable and a nice smooth writer. I really like big pens with a bit of heft, so I've been looking at a Pelikan M800 or M1000. Would I go for a Medium nib in a Pelikan or would that be too wide? Could someone advise me as to the piston filling action with the Souverans? I had a Montblanc 149, also a piston filler, which I never got on with and we eventually parted company. Any guidance much appreciated (apologies if my question is in the incorrect thread),

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2 hours ago, Chimera01 said:

Hello. Thank you for your reply. I really like my Cross Peerless 125 Medium nibs (the Sailor nibs). I also have an S T Dupont M nib that I find quite pleasurable and a nice smooth writer. I really like big pens with a bit of heft, so I've been looking at a Pelikan M800 or M1000. Would I go for a Medium nib in a Pelikan or would that be too wide? Could someone advise me as to the piston filling action with the Souverans? I had a Montblanc 149, also a piston filler, which I never got on with and we eventually parted company. Any guidance much appreciated (apologies if my question is in the incorrect thread),

 

The Sailor nibs on the Peerless pens are, in my experience, quite nice, but they are a different experience from the Pelikan nibs at the M800 and M1000 sizes.

 

Yes, the Pelikan questions might belong in a thread in the Pelikan forum (I am pretty sure there is at least one thread there dedicated to the M800 vs. M1000 discussion/debate), but as this thread is not hugely active, and the moderators here are generally tolerant of some off-topic meandering, and the Cross Peerless is a base reference point, so I will add comments here.

 

Compared to the Sailor nibs, the Pelikan nibs are wide and wet. The M1000 (based on three data points) is a gusher, and the M800 is a rich, wet writing experience. The M800 nib is fairly stiff, while the M1000 has a definite (and to my hand pleasant) softness and flex. If you like the size, weight, and balance of the MB 149, the M1000 will feel comfortable in your hand. If you like MB 146, the M800 will not feel strange, except that the nib is stiffer. If you like broad, wet-writing pens, you will enjoy Pelikans. If you prefer a narrower and more controlled flow, a Pelikan EF nib or another brand is indicated.

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14 hours ago, N1003U said:

If you like the size, weight, and balance of the MB 149, the M1000 will feel comfortable in your hand.

Thank you for the guidance. I never got along with my Montblanc 149 (F nib I seem to recall), I hated it and I'm concerned about making the same mistake twice. It might have been something to do with it being a piston filler - Montblanc and I went back and forth on this - to no avail. So I'm being cautious in my approach to Pelikan although the m1000's softness and flex really does appeal. Am posting a photo of the latest additions to my Cross-Sailor hybrid family, two metallic finishes (medalist and gold), with apologies to the mods for skiing a little off-piste. These pens are in very short supply in the UK and I came to the party late. So not much choice to be had but delighted with my score. Would love to see some photos of the more exotic versions out there.

 

Cross_Peerless_125.jpg

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1 hour ago, Chimera01 said:

It might have been something to do with it being a piston filler


If pens with piston fillers specifically are not your thing, Pelikan will be a difficult brand. The (very nice) piston filling mechanism is practically part of the definition of a Pelikan. I think Pelikan has maybe one or two models that are NOT piston fillers. 

 

One area where the Pelikan experience exceeds the MB, IME, is the ability to easily remove and exchange nibs, for purposes of the occasional deep cleaning/maintenance, and for when you want to quickly and easily change up the nib width on the same pen.

 

Where the MB experience exceeds the Pelikan (again IME, besides the classic MB cigar shape) is that Pelikan nibs generally lack any kind of personality other than a tendency to be a bit stubbish and rather wet-flowing. They are more often than not boring little spheres. The M1000 nibs do have a lovely softness and a bit of spread when you press lightly, but it is often overshadowed by firehouse-like ink flow. MB nibs appeal to me (a little) more from a flow and nib shape perspective.

 

I do enjoy the modem steel Pelikan nibs (crisp-writing and springy), but they come mostly on the smaller M200-series.

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Cross+Sailor=Peerless.  :thumbup:  It is a great combo IF you can get past the heft and girth.

I enjoy mine immensely, as I do the M1000 but for different reasons.

 

European nibs tend to be broader than their Japanese counterparts.

If you are inclined towards 'F' nibs then Japanese would be better whereas for 'B' it would be European.

The pen body/material is an entirely different matter.

 

The piston filler/cartridge discussion is moot, IMO.

Either is reliable and adequate unless your writing needs require the ink capacity offered by a piston filler.

 

On 7/30/2021 at 3:44 AM, langere said:

Yes, I agree!  I find the Cross Peerless to be some of the finest pens made today.  Just absolute highest quality.  I now have two and have enjoyed both of them.  Some of my favorite pens.

 

Erick

:thumbup:

 

On 2/20/2021 at 5:17 AM, Topcat666 said:

Recently acquired a Cross Peerless 125 in black F nib.

Sailor nib.

Excellent nib.

Writes very well.

The cap looks a bit big but so far that's the only criticism I could make.

At present, I can only say I am well impressed with it

I never would have looked at this pen or Cross as a brand but this was a suggestion by a member on another forum and a very good one too.

I'll have to learn to keep an open mind on pen brands and will look at Cross in the future.

An excellent choice, I am pleased you are enjoying it.  :thumbup:  Cross are robust, quality and VFM pens.

You can also consider the Townsend, should you like something will less heft and girth.

Engineer :

Someone who does precision guesswork based on unreliable data provided by those of questionable knowledge.

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  • 4 months later...
On 7/31/2021 at 3:56 PM, N1003U said:


If pens with piston fillers specifically are not your thing, Pelikan will be a difficult brand. The (very nice) piston filling mechanism is practically part of the definition of a Pelikan. I think Pelikan has maybe one or two models that are NOT piston fillers. 

 

One area where the Pelikan experience exceeds the MB, IME, is the ability to easily remove and exchange nibs, for purposes of the occasional deep cleaning/maintenance, and for when you want to quickly and easily change up the nib width on the same pen.

 

Where the MB experience exceeds the Pelikan (again IME, besides the classic MB cigar shape) is that Pelikan nibs generally lack any kind of personality other than a tendency to be a bit stubbish and rather wet-flowing. They are more often than not boring little spheres. The M1000 nibs do have a lovely softness and a bit of spread when you press lightly, but it is often overshadowed by firehouse-like ink flow. MB nibs appeal to me (a little) more from a flow and nib shape perspective.

 

I do enjoy the modem steel Pelikan nibs (crisp-writing and springy), but they come mostly on the smaller M200-series.

 

 

 

 I have finally gotten to the source of my problem, the Montblanc 149 which I purchased in the 1980s was not a piston filler but a bladder fountain pen. I've only realised this after reading up on the history of Montblanc fountain pens. Clearly I don't get on with bladder fountain pens.

 

I've since taken the dive with the recent acquisition of a Pelikan M1000 F. My daily writers at the moment are my Cross Peerless 125's - and the M1000 - which is proving to be a joy. So, piston fillers all OK :)

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On 8/8/2021 at 4:25 PM, 1nkulus said:

 

 

European nibs tend to be broader than their Japanese counterparts.

If you are inclined towards 'F' nibs then Japanese would be better whereas for 'B' it would be European.

 

 

I'd love to get a broad nib for my Peerless....

http://www.aysedasi.co.uk

 

 

 

 

She turned me into a newt.......

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