Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Colorverse Quasar



Recommended Posts

namrehsnoom

Colorverse Quasar

 

1182099977_colorverse-quasar-inkbottle.thumb.jpg.26af3e6949996e04738ea74b7d70092d.jpg


Colorverse is a South Korean company that produces inks that are well-known for their iconic bottles and for their astronomy-related names. The Quasar in this review is from their season 2 inks that were released under the theme “Astrophysics”. The package comes with a big 65 ml bottle and a cute 15 ml small one. Fellow member Lgsoltek graciously gifted me a whole bunch of samples when leaving Paris, giving me the opportunity to try out a range of new inks. This Colorverse Quasar was one of them. 

 

1970611535_colorverse-quasar-title300ppi.thumb.jpeg.7f95ba1d2f353725143c5970683615a6.jpeg


Quasar is a richly saturated purple-leaning blue. The ink writes really well in all nib sizes with very good lubrication. It’s also an ink with a serious golden sheen, especially when using wet nibs. On the other hand, no shading to speak of (probably due to the high level of saturation). Personally, this is not my type of colour and the ink is too saturated for my taste. But that’s just me, you can make your own judgement using the information below.

 

37088811_colorverse-quasar-detail1_5nib.thumb.jpeg.9e02d8747c8a6258e2580d7f2b72d361.jpeg

 

973656452_colorverse-quasar-sheen.thumb.jpg.90139e0576a4b3ac2271373948469957.jpg


Quasar has a very limited dynamic range, with almost no contrast between light and dark parts. To illustrate this, I did a swab where I really saturated portions of the Tomoe River paper with ink, pooling it on. This lack of contrast explains why you get little shading in your writing (especially in finer nibs - the blow-up below with a B-nib is a bit misleading in this respect). You can also see that Quasar is well-saturated. As a result, the ink works great with EF nibs, where it produces a very readable and contrast-rich line. 

 

1149233804_colorverse-quasar-saturation300ppi.thumb.jpeg.13f41d445e5eb7a2773520759edf0417.jpeg


On the smudge test – rubbing text with a moist Q-tip cotton swab – there is a huge amount of smearing, but the text itself remains crisp and clear. Water resistance is completely lacking. The still water test (letting drops of water sit on the page for 15 minutes) produces a colourful mess. With the running water test all ink simply disappears, leaving next to nothing on the page (see water test at the end of the review).

 

2059102401_colorverse-quasar-chromatography300ppi.jpeg.50740b446e29d2a8eef28d4ebe08725f.jpeg


I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On each scrap of paper I show you:

 

  • An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip
  • 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation
  • An ink scribble made with a Lamy Safari M-nib fountain pen
  • The name of the paper used, written with a Lamy Safari B-nib
  • A small text sample, written with the M-nib
  • The source of the quote, written with the B-nib
  • Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib)

 

Colorverse Quasar has a slight tendency to feather on the lower quality papers in my test set, most obvious when using a wet pen. I noticed no issues with better quality paper or when using finer nibs (M-nib or below). A bummer for me was that I also got some feathering on the Paperblanks paper, which is what I use for daily journaling. This is probable due to some inconsistencies during paper production. I’ve noticed that from time to time you get a bundle of paper of lesser quality. Happened a handful of times – I did a quick calculation: 11 notebooks (of 176 pages), a handful of bad bundles (5x 12 pages): that translates to 3% suboptimal paper. A bummer when it happens, but I can live with a 97% success rate.


The ink writes smoothly with good lubrication, and provides excellent contrast with the page. Writing looks good on both white and more yellow paper, but I do prefer the ink’s look on the cream paper. Drying times are fairly low – in the 5 to 10 second range with my Lamy Safari M-nib. 

 

At the end of the review, I also show the back-side of the different paper types, in the same order. A small amount of bleed-through is present on some of the lower-quality papers, but nothing too bad.

 

334558181_colorverse-quasar-sampletext300ppipt1.thumb.jpeg.025a85c5dbf94f4f9eeba210cbc8e4bc.jpeg

1917661815_colorverse-quasar-sampletext300ppipt3.thumb.jpeg.4102e468379b0d049090b66b256d9047.jpeg1603938272_colorverse-quasar-sampletext300ppipt2.thumb.jpeg.149d3323b1b4511689a2c66a358ff341.jpeg

1925211881_colorverse-quasar-sampletext300ppipt4.thumb.jpeg.e0fda79eaffd5f0fe2a3b37f49874d73.jpeg

 


Since scans alone are not always enough to give you a complete picture of the ink, I also provide you with a few photos for an alternative look at Quasar blue.

 

107256463_colorverse-quasar-sampletextphotodetail.thumb.jpg.05d668e28f953107f2fc14ea156220eb.jpg

 

1481461470_colorverse-quasar-sampletextphoto.thumb.jpg.7da089ae473e16bd103bd6945ca214e8.jpg

 

Writing with different nib sizes
The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing. Being a saturated ink, Quasar looks good in all nib sizes from EF up to 1.9 calligraphy nib. I personally prefer this ink with the F/M nib sizes. It’s presence on the page becomes a bit too dominant with the broader nibs.

 

1883227278_colorverse-quasar-nibsizes.thumb.jpeg.8b8a8daad57dc2dc1136c4b3316a7815.jpeg


Related inks
To compare Quasar with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test – all in a very compact format. Diamine Sargasso Sea comes close in colour.

 

1854604488_colorverse-quasar-relatedinks300ppi.thumb.jpeg.12fccba208fdba8f04343df4a1f8f016.jpeg


Inkxperiment – Looking Out The Window
With every review I try to do a single-ink drawing that shows what the ink is capable of in a more artistic setting. The most fun part of the ink review, and I quite enjoy brainstorming and then implementing these little pieces. I had only a very limited amount of ink available, so I needed to maximally reuse the Q-tips used for the swabs in the writing samples. 

 

91110357_colorverse-quasar-inkxperiment300ppi.thumb.jpeg.2e267f8b5ee67a367bdd93d68295f5d1.jpeg


For this inkxperiment I started with a piece of 10x15 cm HP photo paper. I used the Q-tips from the swabs to draw the windows. Next, I used a kitchen sponge and heavily water-diluted ink to sponge in the background. For the window contours, I used my Lamy Safari M-nib and pure Quasar.  Finally, a non-water diluted Q-tip was used to draw in the patterns, and the figure looking out the window.  This little drawing gives you an idea of what can be achieved with Colorverse Quasar in a more artistic setting.

 

1308347593_colorverse-quasar-collage.thumb.jpg.460423544989e13b7b459332a9c60b13.jpg


Conclusion
Colorverse Quasar is a very saturated blue with a strong purple undertone. The ink has a few shortcomings: prone to smudging, no water-resistance. But it works well in all nib sizes and writes flawlessly on better quality paper. I noticed a slight tendency to feather on lower-quality paper. For me personally, this ink is no good match: too saturated, and the colour doesn’t really speak to me. But that’s just me. You can draw your own conclusions with the info above.


Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib

 

952304656_colorverse-quasar-watertest.thumb.jpeg.3f36ef2e235b9b28b40fc74c6ea7cae9.jpeg


Backside of writing samples on different paper types
 

281449761_colorverse-quasar-sampletextbacksidept1.thumb.jpeg.27d7ad0d61899a000ebb60235c386f06.jpeg

2120121381_colorverse-quasar-sampletextbacksidept2.thumb.jpeg.1a1f11e6c54d97427f074d36d40d1335.jpeg

1505307357_colorverse-quasar-sampletextbacksidept3.thumb.jpeg.7481658745b9fd9a4c3581d1ad7dfae4.jpeg

1981087544_colorverse-quasar-sampletextbacksidept4.thumb.jpeg.cab0e880c2eaf2b60f6fbd44f0e98787.jpeg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 10
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • namrehsnoom

    3

  • A Smug Dill

    2

  • yazeh

    1

  • inkstainedruth

    1

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

Another fantastic review for one of the earliest sheening inks, I tried a long time ago. 

Like you I didn't like it at all and I love blue. 

I find it interesting how in your scan/photo before the comparison, looks like blue black and quite dull. 

Finally, I truly loved your inkxperiment. Truly beautiful. :thumbup:

It's more interesting for artwork than writing.... 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
inkstainedruth

Wow.  That ink has some serious sheen to it, doesn't it.  Possibly too much for me.

But thanks as always for the great review.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for another great review!  This time, I especially appreciate the comparisons (so I know not to try those inks :lol: ) and the art lesson (as always - love this bit).

Link to post
Share on other sites
mizgeorge

Fabulous review (I should say another fabulous review). The ink's leaving me feeling a bit nonplussed. I'm not that keen on the colour of the sheen and it's certainly not going to replace any of my much less expensive royal-ish blues.

 

Thank you :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
A Smug Dill

Great review!

 

Hmmm, that combination of colour and sheen just keeps screaming “Diamine!” in my head, and even though I like the colour(s), I don't think I can bring myself to pay Colorverse (per ml or per retail stock unit) prices for the ink.

 

7 hours ago, namrehsnoom said:

A bummer for me was that I also got some feathering on the Paperblanks paper, which is what I use for daily journaling. This is probable due to some inconsistencies during paper production. I’ve noticed that from time to time you get a bundle of paper of lesser quality. Happened a handful of times – I did a quick calculation: 11 notebooks (of 176 pages), a handful of bad bundles (5x 12 pages): that translates to 3% suboptimal paper.

 

Aside: I take it you're using the Paperblanks Flexis 100gsm paper there, then? I've amassed dozens of them (at heavily discounted prices from Amazon Australia), stupidly before I tested how the paper actually performs with (at least my collection of) fountain pens and inks in practice, until last month when I started using a ‘Leonardo's Sketches: Sun & Moonlight’ Flexis midi. Only then did I discover that the paper exhibits bleed-through with more inks than not (although feathering is rare), and it's very sensitive to the wetness of the line. If you're indeed using Flexis notebooks for journalling, then I'll have to go look up all of your past reviews and find what I have, to see how the Paperblanks midi I'm using compare in terms of resisting bleed-through.

 

(I will note that Colorverse Vortex Motion and Dark Energy did surprisingly well in my notebook; but I don't have Quasar to test.)

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

Link to post
Share on other sites
namrehsnoom
2 hours ago, A Smug Dill said:

Aside: I take it you're using the Paperblanks Flexis 100gsm paper there, then?

 

I mostly use Paperblanks Embellished Manuscripts series (Ultra). Mainly because I like the cover designs and the magnetic closure. And the paper is usually very fountain pen friendly across a wide range of inks and nib sizes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
A Smug Dill

I thought the hardcover Embellished Manuscripts notebooks usually have 144 pages each, and occasionally special/anniversary editions have 240 pages, of 120gsm paper. From what I've seen, usually only Flexis have 176 pages each in Midi and Ultra sizes (but some of them have 240 pages).

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

Link to post
Share on other sites
namrehsnoom
1 hour ago, A Smug Dill said:

I thought the hardcover Embellished Manuscripts notebooks usually have 144 pages each, and occasionally special/anniversary editions have 240 pages, of 120gsm paper. From what I've seen, usually only Flexis have 176 pages each in Midi and Ultra sizes (but some of them have 240 pages).

You are totally right. I looked up the wrong type online instead of checking my actual notebook. It’s definitely 144 pages for the normal editions. And I actually have 12 notebooks (forgot to count the current one). Still adds up to about 3% lesser quality paper.  I can live with that. I like these notebooks enough to tolerate the deviation. Usually the paper is top-notch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now







×
×
  • Create New...