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15 hours ago, inkstainedruth said:

...I got distracted by inks that are a little more subtle and nuanced.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

Nice turn of phrase, Ruth. I've always thought the original series of J. Herbin inks fit that description. 

 

I'm also a big fan of Quink Permanent Blue - making sure to always keep a couple of bottles on hand. Fortunately, Endless Pens makes that easy - I used to have to import it from England before they came around. The American distributor doesn't carry it. 😡

 

- Sean  :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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2 hours ago, N1003U said:

Typically, as a good rebel, I would have signed “John Hancock”...

 

Hi N1003U,

 

When you can duplicate his signature; then you've got it. :thumbup:

 

- Sean  :D

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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1 minute ago, corniche said:

When you can duplicate his signature; then you've got it. :thumbup:

 

- Sean  :D

The exact hand of his signature is another thing, but like his attitude that he wanted to sign large enough so George III could read his name without his glasses.

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Bo Bo Olson

The second richest man in the colonies behind Bennie Franklin, Johnny 'The Grasping Hand',  started the revolution for for only 15,000 pounds of guns and ammo, a fortune then, owed the British crown 100,000 pounds in smuggling duties. 

 

The tea tax had been rescinded, when Johnny paid the crooked (stole 15,000 pounds as treasure of Harvard...not prosecuted in it would give Harvard a bad name)) rabble rouser, Sammy 'The Tomahawk' Adams  to get get men drunk on free rum, and dress up in loaned Indian costumes, and throw the tea from the two of the three tea ships at Boston wharf so Johnny could break even with expensive smuggled tea, by destroying his competitors tea supply.

 

Questions like who told the British there was 15,000 pounds of guns and ammunition out at Lexington? I'd bet a super rich man like Johnny had a man at Lexington, paid to be the trigger man for the revolution. No grasping rich man, was going to throw away the arms of his rebellion with out a bit of insurance.

 

Everyone who put their name on the Declaration of Independence, left space for the man who paid for it.......he signed it after the war was over and the peace treaty signed...............that's why there was such a big space left for his 'big bold' signature.

 

Back in the day when most still had B&W TV's, we were taught lies, about his signature....I was taught lies that he signed on the first day.........none mentioned he made much of his fortune was made as a smuggler, nor his tea ship was not plundered at the Boston Tea Party.

 

Yep, the American Revolt, saved Johnny 85,000 pounds, and he was able to break even with his illegally bought there for more expensive smuggled tea, in tea was no longer taxed.

 

Do read 'Oliver Wiswell' by Kenneth Roberts written in the '60's. Even he didn't have the whole story. It will give you a different slant to the American Propaganda lies of the First American Revolt.

The book is so well written I kept hoping down to the second to last page the good guys would win.......and not the pewter candle stick robbing rebels.

It was a thrown war, the Generals and Admirals wanted to drag it out so they could get rid of that Liberal Pitt, and put in a Conservative government.

 

NY City had 100,000 refugees whose house, horse and candle stick had been stolen, and wanted to fight but, were not allowed to do that....it could end the war too soon.

 

A big deal is made out of the Stamp Tax.....the poor didn't have land to speculate with, to pay sales tax on it..........didn't even have any land to start with....had to be promised stolen Indian land to get them to fight at all.

Not sure if slave sale was taxed....would think so. All colonies had slavery. Which may be why there was such a tem tem, about the Stamp Tax....making slaves even more expensive.

 

What upset the normal folks of the city's, was having to room and board drunken horny soldiers, in the midst of horrible global cooling; where due to bad harvests, food was very, very expensive. 1785 the Thames froze over....had happened every @20-50 years due to the narrow arches of London Bridges.

Lizzy 1, use to go out and shoot to mark .... a flag stuck in the ice ; in the ice fairs.

Taxation with out representation....what BS, the well to do in the colonies paid 3% tax, the legally representation Englishman paid 8%.

No one actually wanted legal representation, which would have more than doubled the tax on those well enough off to have to pay it. Such a slogan sure sounded good.

 

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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A Smug Dill
On 1/22/2021 at 6:12 AM, sgphototn said:

I've signed books.

 

In that context, my wife's signature pen — actually, pens, because we thought it was a good idea to have one or two extra on standby just in case — at her last book launch were Pilot Plumix pens, filled with purple ink if I remember correctly. Her book was a children's book with a comet theme, and the Pilot Plumix pens are colourful demonstrators shaped like comets, so it was more ‘fun’ for the kids to see her sign in vivid colours with them. They're also relatively cheap and readily replaceable, so if one got broken or taken when she was distracted talking to adults, it'd be no big deal.

 

Later on, she kept a spare brass Delike Alpha in her handbag as her impromptu book-signing pen, since those pens are small and almost indestructible, so she doesn't need to worry about what else gets thrown into her handbag, or remember to take it out between outings (and she's pretty much a use-the-same-handbag-daily-until-it-breaks kinda girl).

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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47 minutes ago, Bo Bo Olson said:

Everyone who put their name on the Declaration of Independence, left space for the man who paid for it.......he signed it after the war was over and the peace treaty signed...............that's why there was such a big space left for his 'big bold' signature.

 

 

Yea, but the legend version of the story sounds so much better. 😀

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TheRedBeard

Does anyone here remember the original question of this topic? ;):) )

All the best is only beginning now...

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On 1/15/2021 at 11:13 AM, Uncial said:

 

I don't think I've ever been to a meeting where anyone has pulled out a MB and set it on a table to 'show it off' or waggled snow peaks in anyone's face. I'm sure some have used them without me noticing. I've seen a fair few Cross, Sheaffer and Parker though but I tend to notice because I like pens. Nobody really comments on pens here and I suspect the vast majority of people never notice what's being used and really don't care. I use MB all the time and for years and years of use nobody has ever passed a comment. It tends to be more brightly coloured pens like Visconti that attract attention and that people think of as 'pretentious' with comment like, 'Oh, that's a bit flash!', and as a result I tend to reserve that type of pen for home use. I guess if you really want pretention though, you've got to go with one of Montegrappa's most hideous creations. But you're really after a non-pretentious pen for signatures only, I'd go with a BIC.

 

I've never been to a meeting where someone was using a fountain pen......   I clearly didn't frequent a better class of meeting......  ;)

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30 minutes ago, TheRedBeard said:

Does anyone here remember the original question of this topic? ;):) )

Touché.

 

We were looking for a special occasion pen that was nice but not overly flashy, if I am not mistaken...

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TheRedBeard
3 minutes ago, N1003U said:

Touché.

 

We were looking for a special occasion pen that was nice but not overly flashy, if I am not mistaken...

Perfect :)

 

All the best is only beginning now...

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Bo Bo Olson
2 hours ago, TheRedBeard said:

Does anyone here remember the original question of this topic? ;):) )

:headsmack: That is narrow minded............it had to do with sable haired signature brushes...eh?

A signature pen, is not IMO, bland. It is some sort of status pen, with the appropriate nib that makes a signature bold. I'm sure one could use an Esterbrook....some are pretty.

 

I have a simple burgundy Snorkel, made in Australia,  that has the nib....a factory stubb BB in maxi-semi-flex (Commonwealth and English Parker and Shaffer are often semi-flex in they had to compete with Swan's many flexes of nib)...........the signature wouldn't know the difference between that and others. Now if it was a fancy Admiral, or Saratoga or President, then it would be a 'signature pen.'

 

I have a stubbed BB 146 regular flex..........but my signature pen (doubt if I'll ever use it for it's purpose) is a rolled gold Pelikan 500 tortoise with a 30 degree grind OBB in a maxi-semi-flex nib. It's line is too wide to use it for writing. 2/3s-3/4ths a page for a 15 to 19 letter legal name. Can't use it for anything else.................now to run out and find something to sign with it.:unsure:

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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