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Nibs Pre-Tuned



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MoriartyR

I think there’s an additional point to be made here about what should be the requirement for a good online sales business. Dill’s example with Parker is a good example where their business is not currently fit to service remote sales. They provided a functioning nib, but the line width was not acceptable to a reasonable customer even though it presumably satisfied Parker’s manufacturing tolerances. So Parker failed because their business only works acceptably for customers who can test the pens in-store.

 

The point is that if you are buying remotely you cannot dip-test the nib and the seller therefore needs to build into their service a way to address this.

 

Many online clothes stores long ago realised that customers need a fuss-free returns process in order to buy with confidence without trying the clothes on. And the customers need reliable advice on the fit of each garment (e.g. shoes fit slightly larger than size so order a half-size larger than usual). These companies, like Pret a Porter / Mr Porter have worked this out beautifully and their business model works. Anyone who sells fountain pens online needs to address this issue of the customer not being able to try the nib before buying, otherwise they will (and should) be put out of business by vendors who can address this.

 

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Detman101
1 hour ago, MoriartyR said:

I think there’s an additional point to be made here about what should be the requirement for a good online sales business. Dill’s example with Parker is a good example where their business is not currently fit to service remote sales. They provided a functioning nib, but the line width was not acceptable to a reasonable customer even though it presumably satisfied Parker’s manufacturing tolerances. So Parker failed because their business only works acceptably for customers who can test the pens in-store.

 

The point is that if you are buying remotely you cannot dip-test the nib and the seller therefore needs to build into their service a way to address this.

 

Many online clothes stores long ago realised that customers need a fuss-free returns process in order to buy with confidence without trying the clothes on. And the customers need reliable advice on the fit of each garment (e.g. shoes fit slightly larger than size so order a half-size larger than usual). These companies, like Pret a Porter / Mr Porter have worked this out beautifully and their business model works. Anyone who sells fountain pens online needs to address this issue of the customer not being able to try the nib before buying, otherwise they will (and should) be put out of business by vendors who can address this.

 

"Customer Service" is such a rare find these days.
From fountain pens...to online gaming...to storefront retail.
Everyone seems to have a "Buy/use my product and don't you dare complain!" attitude...
Then they complain when their business/company/gaming server goes down in flames.
Is the world really that ignorant and angry? Why not just take care of the customer??
That WAS the original point of starting the business....wasn't it??

 

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MoriartyR

Detman, I think people have pen stores and they decide to expand into online sales without really understanding that online is a different business than brick & mortar. Most of the really successful online businesses in different industries have reinvented the traditional business model to redefine what service means. Some of them - Amazon, Uber, etc. provide really great customer service - streets ahead of traditional businesses. There is much more to it than just building a website.

 

I actually think that service is even more important for online businesses. When you, as a customer, do not see who you are dealing with, creating trust is essential otherwise there is no brand, no customer experience, no customer loyalty.

 

 

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Detman101
7 hours ago, MoriartyR said:

Detman, I think people have pen stores and they decide to expand into online sales without really understanding that online is a different business than brick & mortar. Most of the really successful online businesses in different industries have reinvented the traditional business model to redefine what service means. Some of them - Amazon, Uber, etc. provide really great customer service - streets ahead of traditional businesses. There is much more to it than just building a website.

 

I actually think that service is even more important for online businesses. When you, as a customer, do not see who you are dealing with, creating trust is essential otherwise there is no brand, no customer experience, no customer loyalty.

 

 

That is a great explanation of the foundation of their shortcomings. Such a shame that they aren't flexible/adaptable enough to transition. And as always, it's the customers that suffer first.
Thank you.

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