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Red Tortoiseshell M600



Chiroptera121

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chromantic
29 minutes ago, dms525 said:

 

The Leonardo section is a bit unusual in appearance, but it is extremely comfortable (for me) to write with. 

 

David

 

What is that red ink? It's quite nice.

It's hard work to tell which is Old Harry when everybody's got boots on.

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1 hour ago, chromantic said:

 

What is that red ink? It's quite nice.

 

It is Leonardo "Red Passion." It is similar to several other favorites of mine - Diamine Oxblood, Graf von Faber-Castell "India Red," and other brownish-red inks.

 

Thanks for asking.

 

David

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chromantic
9 hours ago, dms525 said:

 

It is Leonardo "Red Passion." It is similar to several other favorites of mine - Diamine Oxblood, Graf von Faber-Castell "India Red," and other brownish-red inks.

 

Thanks for asking.

 

David

 

No, thank you. I don't see any brown myself in the pic but some people also see brown in Monaco Red where I don't, whereas the brown in Oxblood is quite obvious to me.

It's hard work to tell which is Old Harry when everybody's got boots on.

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On 1/28/2021 at 10:38 AM, daenghafez said:

Here’s the foursome red pelikan..

 

C37A28BF-D2A9-4981-802A-32076B08E696.jpeg

Hi,

This is a very nice collection indeed! Yet, the one on the very left caught my eye in particular.

Is it the scarce and legendary 1935 portuguese “100 Oversize”, aka. “Magnum”,  possibly the most important evolutionary link in Pelikan fountain pen history, the prototype of 100N?

Where and when did you get it?

Would you please post few pictures of its nib and grip-section?

Thanks!

(:

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daenghafez
17 hours ago, stoen said:

Hi,

This is a very nice collection indeed! Yet, the one on the very left caught my eye in particular.

Is it the scarce and legendary 1935 portuguese “100 Oversize”, aka. “Magnum”,  possibly the most important evolutionary link in Pelikan fountain pen history, the prototype of 100N?

Where and when did you get it?

Would you please post few pictures of its nib and grip-section?

Thanks!

🙂

Hi there

 

I purchased the Magnum pen from a Portuguese seller some years back. The pen is in a very good condition and is working. Currently it is not in use and is kept in storage.
 

Here goes the photos..

3F620F5D-B28C-4ACB-A22F-4C68F9EAD79A.jpeg

0CE5C71B-DF18-4ABD-BED0-FDFFA5AB996D.jpeg

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10 hours ago, daenghafez said:

I purchased the Magnum pen from a Portuguese seller some years back

Hello —

 

Thanks for the post and the explanation. A very rare and interesting pen, indeed! Beautiful nuances of red! Congratulations on the find!

 

Does it have the “Emegê” engraving on the sleeve and cap top? Can’t see them...

 

What kind of surprises me is seeing from the nib type that the pen could have been manufactured somewhat later than expected - in 1937/38?

 

Although no official records exist, is it possible that this pen model has been manufactured for the portuguese speaking market beyond 1935?

 

Otherwise, may it also be possible that its original nib got replaced/upgraded for a more up-to-date 100N nib at some point?

 

All in all, to stay on topic, I miss very much this noble, organic, “antique red” color in many modern Pelikan pens and their new classical re-issues. I find many of their modern red pens somehow plain, lacking this unique “depth of color”. I understand materials are different now, yet...

Thanks for sharing!

 

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daenghafez
51 minutes ago, stoen said:

Hello —

 

Thanks for the post and the explanation. A very rare and interesting pen, indeed! Beautiful nuances of red! Congratulations on the find!

 

Does it have the “Emegê” engraving on the sleeve and cap top? Can’t see them...

 

What kind of surprises me is seeing from the nib type that the pen could have been manufactured somewhat later than expected - in 1937/38?

 

Although no official records exist, is it possible that this pen model has been manufactured for the portuguese speaking market beyond 1935?

 

Otherwise, may it also be possible that its original nib got replaced/upgraded for a more up-to-date 100N nib at some point?

 

All in all, to stay on topic, I miss very much this noble, organic, “antique red” color in many modern Pelikan pens and their new classical re-issues. I find many of their modern red pens somehow plain, lacking this unique “depth of color”. I understand materials are different now, yet...

Thanks for sharing!

 

1. Thank you for your compliment.

2. Yes, it does. It is at the captop with a faint engraving Emege. I was told by the seller that the pen is the earlier model. You can see it from the photo. The cursive Emege engraved at the cap tube is a later Magnum model.

3. I am not sure about the nib whether it had been replaced/upgraded and whether it came later. From my reading, a Magnum should have a triangle sign on the nib (which it doesnt have) but I cant vouch where I read it.

4. Some photos of this Magnum pen with its other junior.

 

256434B8-9C67-4A2F-BCC0-7DEAFBCED784.jpeg

11F49A06-9F9B-4FEE-99A3-9F95D539132F.jpeg

003F0BBD-2BAF-44E9-895D-6AC84F7D3F90.jpeg

7BE8D8C0-F62F-4D09-8F27-C50C1EE2E0FA.jpeg

319DA95D-4E19-4818-B0A6-E7E3ABA2BA4F.jpeg

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  • 2 weeks later...
Intensity

To me those vintage versions look very poorly.  Meaning their condition might be judged as great for vintage, but if I compare directly to a modern red tortoiseshell M101N, they look scary.  Actually I wonder if it’s the fate awaiting my M101Ns.  But hopefully the modern materials are more stable, so I won’t see such degradation over my lifespan.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 

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mizgeorge
2 hours ago, Intensity said:

To me those vintage versions look very poorly.  Meaning their condition might be judged as great for vintage, but if I compare directly to a modern red tortoiseshell M101N, they look scary.  Actually I wonder if it’s the fate awaiting my M101Ns.  But hopefully the modern materials are more stable, so I won’t see such degradation over my lifespan.

Isn't it funny how different perceptions are! I think these vintage pens are utterly beautiful. Full of life and character (and I can guarantee they will write in just the same spirit) and just a joy to even look at, let alone use. 

 

To my eyes, mass produced modern pens just look boring by comparison. I'm sure most of them work beautifully (though reading a lot of posts would suggest that not all of them do), but I have no desire at all to own any of them. 

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Hi, there,

 

perhaps I can make a few comments trying to transcend the comparison of opinions. In my experience, there is no such thing as “those vintage pens”, or “those modern pens”. Such generalizations simply don’t happen to work here.

 

I don’t know what a pen is, until I have it in my hands. I’ve seen dozens of them in really poor condition, no matter of their age. Yet, I had some pens in such a condition and function that I couldn’t believe their age. I was also lucky to know few true masters of pen restoration. Not only as “collectibles”, but as first class writing instruments. I learned this is very much a matter of maintenence.

 

It is true that inventors of “high-tech” materials from 1900s couldn’t forsee how their materials could behave a century later, but the facts about materials cannot be generalized, because production costs of mass production (machining vs. injection moulding) are also part of the material technology “equation”. Some materials were substituted to reduce costs and increase profit.

 

In my experience, vintage pens are interesting to me (if fully functional) if they provide more versatile writing control, but are often not intended for heavy-handed writing.

 

I’ve also seen many of high-end writing instruments being produced nowadays using the same traditional materials as a century ago (ebonite, celluloid, bakelite). I don’t see what makes these materials inferior to, let’s say, self-polishing resin?

 

 

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Intensity

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.  What I meant is not that the vintage pens shown on the last photograph are not beautiful, but rather they really show their age--they look like aged plastic.  Aged plastic, unlike tarnished silver, looks cheap to me. Some of it of course is the mechanical wear, like scuffs and scratches.  But the difference is beyond that: it's the discoloration too.  The discoloration is what I worry about.  Like translucent parts yellowing or becoming more opaque, and various parts generally losing their initial appearance and looking like poorly aged plastic.  Was the dark red always that dull and dark?  Or was it originally brighter and clearer?  etc.

 

When there is no point of comparison with modern pens, it's easy to overlook discoloration and deterioration and treat the pens as they are in their current state.  When we have modern releases of vintage pens--as in the case of red tortoiseshell M101N and to some extent this new M600 Red Tortoiseshell--the difference between the brand new and vintage becomes extremely apparent.  That's the scary part for me: how unkind time was to the plastics used in the vintage pens.  (Not just plastic either--the metal parts also start to show age over time, lose coating, dull, etc.)

 

I love lucite Parker 51s that age super well and look excellent even now 50-70 years later.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 

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Karmachanic
4 hours ago, Intensity said:

To me those vintage versions look very poorly.

 

No wabi sabi for you then!

"Simplicate and add Lightness."

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Intensity

Not with plastics, for sure.  I just make an automatic association with celluloid rot and rubbery dolls turning sticky.  Wood, metal, stone, and ceramic (, and paper) aging don't bother me.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Bikerchick
On 1/28/2021 at 10:38 AM, daenghafez said:

Nice trio red pelikans. By the way, did you paint the Pelikan name at the captop of M101N brown tortoise? Nicely done!

 

Here’s the foursome red pelikan..

 

C37A28BF-D2A9-4981-802A-32076B08E696.jpeg

 
That is some spectacular eye candy you've got there.  I have a fondness for Pelikans, especially the tortoise ones. That Magnum is gorgeous. I want one, but they're exceptionally hard to find, not to mention pretty expensive. I missed one on eBay a few weeks ago because it was a little out of my price range.

Enjoy!

What is this money pit obsession hole I have fallen into? 

 

My other passion

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🙂

My primary pen -

Well... it’s not a M600, it’s not a Magnum, but it’s still a red tortoiseshell pen - the noble brownish vintage dark-red I would also like to see in some modern Pelikan pens or their “historical re-issues” very much...

E2BD85E7-13D9-4518-99BF-245123C8986E.jpeg.a4cc4741574658ab27b70808a89c2b5a.jpeg

Hope you like it...

 

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Bikerchick
3 hours ago, stoen said:

 

Hope you like it...

 

 

Like it? I don't.

I love it. 
What a beauty. 

What is this money pit obsession hole I have fallen into? 

 

My other passion

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stephenchin
On 2/23/2021 at 3:58 AM, stoen said:

🙂

My primary pen -

Well... it’s not a M600, it’s not a Magnum, but it’s still a red tortoiseshell pen - the noble brownish vintage dark-red I would also like to see in some modern Pelikan pens or their “historical re-issues” very much...

E2BD85E7-13D9-4518-99BF-245123C8986E.jpeg.a4cc4741574658ab27b70808a89c2b5a.jpeg

Hope you like it...

 

Completely agree.  After many versions, Peikan has not come close to the gorgeous hue on the vintage Pelikan red hard rubber of the 30's and 40's.  

 

BTW, there is Pelikan documentation in the Magnum.  I believe I may even have a photocopy of an original Pelikan factory invoice or Portuguese distributor order showing it in the 30's.  I'll see if I can dig it up easily.  But I believe it has been posted on here before.

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