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Esterbrook 66



peterg
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Was going to sell this pen but...

It has a great nib that makes my writing look decent!

Looking like a deminutive Dollarpen it was produced from about 1935 until the War stopped play. Made in their own UK factory.

P1040050 - Copy.JPG

P1040067 - Copy.JPG

P1040049 - Copy.JPG

Edited by peterg
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A beautiful line. I have always admired these pens. Great catch!

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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I have a Relief 2-L with a Fine 314 nib that I would never sell. These pens are quite nice.

Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

Robert Frost

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Estycollector

Very nice and thank you 🙏 for posting.

"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"

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inkstainedruth

Nice pen, peterg! And you're right -- that nib is awesome. I don't blame you for wanting to keep it.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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What are the differences between the 2-L, the 12, and the 66?

Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

Robert Frost

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You have the 2-L, which has a very British '30s look to it. It may be because of the ties between Esterbrook and Conway-Stewart, who made the Relief pens in the UK..

The Relief 66 looks like a longer version of the Dollar pens, with a different clip and lever. The cap has the "Relief" stamp, but the barrel is stamped "Esterbrook"

The Relief 12 looks exactly like a CS 28, but with the Relief stamp, and the Relief/Esterbrook nib.

 

Brian Anderson has a lot of information on his Esterbrook site:
http://www.esterbrook.net/relief.shtml

Edited by gweimer1
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  • 1 month later...

And now I have one of your Relief 12 pens, filled today with Diamine Onyx Black ink, which goes oh so well with the gray hatch pattern.  Thanks, again, Gary!

Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

Robert Frost

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20 hours ago, corgicoupe said:

And now I have one of your Relief 12 pens, filled today with Diamine Onyx Black ink, which goes oh so well with the gray hatch pattern.  Thanks, again, Gary!

 

😎

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 10/25/2020 at 2:24 PM, corgicoupe said:

What are the differences between the 2-L, the 12, and the 66?

The 2 L and 12 were made by Conway Stewart to their standards.

 

The 66 was more stylisticly an Esterbrook pen, made by Esterbrook in 'their factory' in England. This factory was probably that of Hazell, Watson & Viney, Esterbrook's UK distributer who had built up a substantial stationery business or (I think more likely) John Mitchell's of Birmingham. Esterbrook had close relations with Mitchell's from the very beginings when he took five of their craftsmen with him to establish his US business. Plus, Mitchell's manufactured Esterbrook dip pen nibs in the UK. Like Altura and Waterman's, Mitchell's were bought out by Esterbrook in 1947.

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