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Aurora Optima: Arguably The Best Modern Italian Pen, Especially If You Use Pens For Writing.



dms525

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I would if I had one :(

I pick one up every year I'm at the London Pen show.
. . . I put one down every year at the London Pen show.

I know one day I will own one.

That's a beautiful bunch. Thank you :)

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I pick one up every year I'm at the London Pen show.

. . . I put one down every year at the London Pen show.

 

 

 

I can't seem to find out if the London Pen show is still on in early October 2020. An email to WES has not been answered (sent a few weeks ago).

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I can't seem to find out if the London Pen show is still on in early October 2020. An email to WES has not been answered (sent a few weeks ago).

Let us know if you hear of anything. I've a feeling it'll be postponed amid the Covid 19 restrictions.

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Let us know if you hear of anything. I've a feeling it'll be postponed amid the Covid 19 restrictions.

 

Yes, I will do. I may try and phone them if there is a number, but I think you are right and it won't go ahead as things are getting worse with Covid-19.

 

Best wishes

 

Peter

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My six

 

fpn_1600997158__six_optimas.png

 

Three Italian Flag pens at the top, then Mare, Primavera, and a recent 14k-nibbed Optima at the bottom, the first I bought.

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My six

 

fpn_1600997158__six_optimas.png

 

Three Italian Flag pens at the top, then Mare, Primavera, and a recent 14k-nibbed Optima at the bottom, the first I bought.

The Italian flag set is one I really regret parting with when money got tight several years ago...I still have a red Auroloide that has a music stub nib and an 88 Demonstrator.

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I am sorry to hear that Carguy, although if a couple of them went through Peyton St pens a few years ago then they are well-travelled to a place where they are still appreciated. :)

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Several weeks ago, I decided to wake up my Africa, but to my utter dismay, I discovered that the plunger had disengaged from the rod. As I have been unemployed [without new income] since the end of January, I had to put it in the waiting for repairs ward. I will miss it; it is a lovely pen, very smooth. I hope that next year things will improve and I can get it and two other invalids repaired.

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Several weeks ago, I decided to wake up my Africa, but to my utter dismay, I discovered that the plunger had disengaged from the rod. As I have been unemployed [without new income] since the end of January, I had to put it in the waiting for repairs ward. I will miss it; it is a lovely pen, very smooth. I hope that next year things will improve and I can get it and two other invalids repaired.

http://www.taskyprianou.com/me_sad_140.jpg

 

I'd offer a free repair if I knew what I was doing. Sadly I've no real clue in that dept.

Can I send out an ink sample to cheer you up? :)

 

Things will get better.

 

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Several weeks ago, I decided to wake up my Africa, but to my utter dismay, I discovered that the plunger had disengaged from the rod. As I have been unemployed [without new income] since the end of January, I had to put it in the waiting for repairs ward. I will miss it; it is a lovely pen, very smooth. I hope that next year things will improve and I can get it and two other invalids repaired.

My Africa has had both the end cap disengage & a year later the body broke into @ the section. Both times I sent it to KENRO who shipped it off to Aurora & each time it was repaired.

 

I understand your reluctance to spend money when less is coming in but you might check with Kenro when possible to see if yours could be repaired thru their repair department. It was a pleasure to have mine repaired @ nominal cost.

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Having heard several times of Barkingpig's problem, with the barrel's proclivity of separating into two pieces, in conjunction with the long repair time and lack of communication, has put these pens on the no buy list.

 

Am I missing something?

"Simplicate and add Lightness."

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I have read of the same problems so understand your position. So far I am six of six on the side of no problems so I will just keep enjoying them until maybe I don't. Then again, I drove an Alfa Romeo for six years in the 1970s so perhaps I am inured to such things. :)

They are definitely great writing pens and stylish to boot. I recommend them. Or Pelikan. The car analogies one can imagine are not way out of line.

 

edit:extra info

Edited by praxim

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Having heard several times of Barkingpig's problem, with the barrel's proclivity of separating into two pieces, in conjunction with the long repair time and lack of communication, has put these pens on the no buy list.

 

Am I missing something?

 

I understood the problem of the plunger has been only for the pens produced for the first years of production, but later the system has been modifyed.

I think, but I'm not sure, that also the problem of the barrel easy to broke is only for some colors of the auraloide or acrilic material used for the body.

I had one of the early produced pens with the plunger brocken, and Aurora Service changed both the plunger and the barrel of the pen, even if the barrel was ok. Is the blue/green in the picture.

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My Africa has been repaired by Aurora via Kenro once before. The barrel and section began to separate and leaked ink. It took a really long time, lying over for the Italian everyone-gets-August-off month, but it eventually came back with only shipping expense. I don't expect it to be repaired without charge again, given its age, but I might contact Kenro just to see.

 

This has not turned me off of Aurora, because the ones I have are a delight when they aren't broke.

 

I understand the remarks about Alfa Romeo very well; between my brother and me, we have had five Morgans [all Plus 4] in the family. :lol:

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Wow David! Wonderful set, you guys are making me jealous!

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Aurora Optima: Arguably The Best Modern Italian Pen, Especially If You Use Pens For Writing.

 

 

David

 

I'd love to know why you think so. I have no opinion since I have never tried one, but I do have a couple of vintage and a modern 88, which I admire but I'm not sure I would lavish this much praise on them. Does the Optima have different nibs from the 88?

Edited by Paul-in-SF
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I'd love to know why you think so. I have no opinion since I have never tried one, but I do have a couple of vintage and a modern 88, which I admire but I'm not sure I would lavish this much praise on them. Does the Optima have different nibs from the 88?

 

Here's why I admire the Aurora Optimas:

* The size is about perfect. It fits well in my hand, posted or unposted and fits securely in shirt pockets. (Larger pens which I may prefer for writing at my desk stick up too far in a shirt pocket.)

* The section is of comfortable size and shape for long writing sessions.

* The shape is neither boringly conventional nor outrageously unconventional. I find it attractive.

* The materials in many editions are of great beauty.

* The nibs: Made in-house. Almost all of mine have been custom-ground, but, including the few that are factory standard, all are among my best writing nibs. They are mostly just slightly toothy, enough to give some feedback but not too much to interfere with smooth, rhythmic writing.

* They are piston fillers. The pistons work smoothly and, for me, reliably without exception.

* The ink window is clear and, unlike some with colored plastic, actually informative regarding the amount of ink remaining.

* Ink delivery is consistent up to when it is completely exhausted. The double reservoir is useful, but not often for me.

 

These are details, but I could just say, "They are beautiful and reliable and enjoyable to write with." On the flip side, I find them to be flawless.

 

There are other pens that are as beautiful or more so, but most don't write as well. Others write as well, but are not as attractive. Others are wonderful, except for some annoying attribute.

 

Regarding the 88 versus Optima nibs: The modern "large" 88's and 888's (limited editions) use exactly the same nibs as the Optimas. Note that, for both the 88's and Optimas, the standard issues use 14Kt nibs and the LE's use 18Kt nibs. FWIW, I don't perceive any difference in how the 14 and 18Kt nibs write.

 

Maybe TMI, but you asked.

 

Happy writing!

 

David

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I love my Auroras - both 88s and Optimas - and endorse all the reasons David points out. I would also like to add a few more points.

 

One thing about nibs that matters a great deal to me (and I don’t see people talking about this) is having long tines and the tipping material right at the point of the nib, as is the case especially with Aurora and Sailor nibs. This makes the nib more precise and gives me greater control. I can see exactly where the ink will flow to the paper. Montblanc nibs, at the opposite end of the scale, feel clumsy and imprecise to me because the tines are short and the tipping material is underneath the nib, a little back from the point, so the contact point between nib and page is obscured.

 

The long section on both the 88 and Optima is very comfortable and, again, promotes precision and control in writing.

 

Beyond this, I find the nib widths to be more consistent than other large European brands, and if you like a fine nib (as I do) then Aurora is one of the few non-Japanese makers that actually provides a true fine nib.

 

Optimas and 88s are engineered for reliable, comfortable writing, made to a high quality, with beautiful materials that are distinctively Aurora’s.

Edited by MoriartyR
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