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Renaissance Wax


davisrankin
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Waxing a pen surface might protect it temporarily, but the wax eventually wears out, and it might be difficult to remove after a while to start fresh. Not sure about specific Renaissance wax.

 

Also keep in mind that some pen materials, such as celluloid, need to breathe and be in storage with good air circulation to avoid what is known as "celluloid rot". Celluloid pens should not be waxed at all.

 

From what I've read so far, waxing is not recommended for pens. Rather the preferred method of restoration is polishing a pen's surface.

Edited by Intensity

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 

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As noted, there are good reasons not to use wax on celluloid pens, any kind of wax including Renaissance wax. We used to use carnauba wax, but even that contains acids which could react in a negative way with celluloids.

 

There was a study a few years ago that showed that Renaissance wax is especially difficult to remove without harsh solvents, and even then some remained behind. The only thing that I use now is a polish that contains only a micro crystal abrasive in a water suspension - no wax or solvents.

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Dale Beebe sold a tin of Renaissance Wax to me at a pen show to use it on a resin 146 before I was warned not to apply it to pens at the very same show. Okay, so it's been in my toolbox for well over a decade. What is it good for? (The only thing I wax these days are my car's headlight covers after polishing them, but I use a recommended synthetic wax.)

Edited by FredRydr
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As far as i know Renaissance wax is developed by The Britisch Museum to protect the items in the collection.

I use it as a protective coating on collection pens (and other old items) that i display and i don't use it on pens that are in use on a daily basis.

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Its a wax which provides a micro thin layer to prevent oxidation.

 

I use it on gold and gold plated watch cases. Does it work, maybe if they are just stored but it probably wears off when they are used.

 

The BritMu items most probably don't move once its applied so it does the job for them.

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Dale Beebe sold a tin of Renaissance Wax to me at a pen show to use it on a resin 146 before I was warned not to apply it to pens at the very same show. Okay, so it's been in my toolbox for well over a decade. What is it good for? (The only thing I wax these days are my car's headlight covers after polishing them, but I use a recommended synthetic wax.)

 

 

You make a good point, a surprisingly large number of people confuse polishing with waxing.

 

But does no one - (apart from me) wax their car any more, I still polish the car and then a coat of wax or sealant.

 

I still polish my wood furniture with a high beeswax - just realized after I typed that - using wax and polish as interchangeable verbs.

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Renaissance Wax is no longer used in museums. They found it was having a detrimental effect on some items. I wouldn't put it - or any other wax - on a fountain pen.

Regards,

Eachan

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Renaissance Wax is no longer used in museums. They found it was having a detrimental effect on some items. I wouldn't put it - or any other wax - on a fountain pen.

I looked to see if I had the article bookmarked. I can't find it anymore, but that was the gist of the article I mentioned above, plus details of how hard it is to remove.

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I'm a regular user of Renaissance Wax!

 

I have used it on many materials; woods, metals and plastics as well as just about every pen I currently own or have ever owned and after many years of use have never seen any negative effects. And as far as the claims that it takes some sort of a "nuclear" option to remove I have never found that to be the case. YMMV

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I'm a regular user of Renaissance Wax!

 

I have used it on many materials; woods, metals and plastics as well as just about every pen I currently own or have ever owned and after many years of use have never seen any negative effects. And as far as the claims that it takes some sort of a "nuclear" option to remove I have never found that to be the case. YMMV

David Nishimura re polishing and wax.....I agree with him.....

 

https://vintagepens.com/FAQrepair/polishing_pens.shtml

 

Fred

say good nite Gracie.........................

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I have a tin of this stuff at home. I used it occassionally on vintage ebonite pens. If I should not use it on pens, perhaps I can still use it on my shoes? :-))))

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I'm a regular user of Renaissance Wax!

 

I have used it on many materials; woods, metals and plastics as well as just about every pen I currently own or have ever owned and after many years of use have never seen any negative effects. And as far as the claims that it takes some sort of a "nuclear" option to remove I have never found that to be the case. YMMV

 

My information came from a study done by museum archive people, not someone who is a hobbyist. There is a link in David's article that I think went to the study. That is no longer available.

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My information came from a study done by museum archive people, not someone who is a hobbyist. There is a link in David's article that I think went to the study. That is no longer available.

 

As I remember that study referenced specific antiquities, though I could be wrong, so I'l stick to my many years of experienced use as a "hobbyist" rather than your judgement as a so-called "expert".

 

And to be clear I'm not advocating that anyone should or must use it, just passing along that my long term and continued use has been nothing but positive.

 

As far as fountain pens I have found that it has been a great help in mitigating the ring marks commonly left on pen barrels from both posting and capping. I've also found that when applied to pen sections it makes there clean-up after inking quicker as well as keeps any ink from creeping onto the section when left in a vertical pen holder, yes I've had a couple of older pens that occasionally did that with certain inks. And with ebonite pens it has been great to keep them looking perfect and shiny without any discoloration from inks, handling or water used in cleaning. Currently all of my vintage and modern Pelikans, Pilots, Montblancs, Kawecos, Sheaffers and various ebonite pens have been waxed and I couldn't be happier with them.

 

So...the haters can hate, and if you don't want to use it...don't. Just giving my "experience" and opinion. YMMV.

Edited by austinwft
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And to be clear I'm not advocating that anyone should or must use it, just passing along that my long term and continued use has been nothing but positive.

 

Which is in effect, advocating. It's not a matter of "hating" anything. But prudence based on the observations of people who are engaged in long term preservation of old items. Damage often does not show up until years later as the effects of a trigger may be delayed.

 

You can of course do as you wish. They are your pens. But my comments are addressed to others who may be contemplating using wax. Thirty years of of pen collecting and repair experience, and 16 years in the business.... That's a very broad and deep data set to draw from when giving advice.

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I fully underscribe the the comment of Austinwft. Especially (his/her reaction at) where the word hobbyist comes in. Bit of topic but my genaral feeling about these so called professionals: Only by making mistakes one can learn. So encourage people to take some risks to become experts themselves instead...

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...So...the haters can hate....

Why do people label those who disagree as "haters"?

 

Don't answer; it's a rhetorical question.

Edited by FredRydr
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I don't "hate" wax! I just wouldn't use it on pens. The difficulties have been explained. I'm not aware of any possible benefit.

Regards,

Eachan

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