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The Meisterstück 149 Calligraphy Appreciation Thread


fpupulin

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On 7/11/2021 at 8:18 AM, fpupulin said:

 

 

Yes, my dear friends, during the fourteen months of this thread, I believe I was an honest ambassador of Calligraphy. A passionate ambassador, I would say, because I believe in this product. Calligraphy is by far the pen I use the most today, and by far the one I enjoy the most with.


I opened this topic of "appreciation" some time ago, because I had the impression that at the time there were many discussions and comments non-first-hand, sometimes even misleading, on this pen, and I feared that this mass of confused and contradictory information could prevent someone from buying a pen that I consider, from a functional point of view, one of the best things Montblanc has put on the market in the last 20 years.


With the "pen pals" of this thread we shared a long road of experiments with papers and inks, to find which of the combinations could get the most out of this interesting nib. I imagine there will be exceptions, but certainly most of the friends who have looked at this thread have done so to tell their discovery and enjoyment of a contemporary flexible nib that really lives up to its name. For some, the Calligraphy nib has even represented the door to the fascinating world of calligraphy, which is undoubtedly a noble way to use a pen!


I remember when I bought my Calligraphy, I wondered if Montblanc shouldn't have mounted this special nib on a pen made especially for it, rather than on the very classic 149. Today I'm glad they didn't (although I'd like to find a way to distinguish at first sight my Calligraphy from the other 149s in my collection), and indeed the decision of Montblanc led me to a rediscovery of the 149 - my first "important" pen when I was not yet 20 years old -, its aesthetics and its perfect functionality. A 149 is not fancy: it's just a well thought out pen with a timeless style, and the flexible nib gives it a touch of originality and panache.

In recent months I have often compared the performance of the Calligraphy nib with those of the few flexible vintage nibs in my collection, mostly from the 1950s-60s. Here I want to offer you another comparison.

In Italy I found a beautiful Parker Duofold senior streamlined pen, made in Canada, with a beautiful flexible extra-fine nib, which will be at least 80 years old, waiting for me. With this pen and the Alt Goldgrün ink by Rohrer & Klingner I wrote a quote of my own invention on calligraphy, in Italian.

large.2016304416_ParkerDuofoldCanadaScrivereamanoFP.jpg.eef3522eb1b88d7f68738c9a7a03e718.jpg

Then, on the same laid paper, I wrote the same aphorism in English, using Diamine's Calligraphy and Ancient Copper ink with my Montblanc 149 Calligraphy (the guidelines on the leaf were then erased).

 

large.1139063272_Montblanc149CalligraphyHandwritingFP.jpg.1000f2aa661495ecac49033334d9f6d9.jpg


My enthusiasm it's not because I'm a sort of an ambassador on this forum, but because the Calligraphy nib really writes like a quality vintage classic!

 

It is very much for an impeccable and shiny contemporary pen, with a support service behind it should it be necessary ...

 

large.1116193311_HandwritingFP.jpg.a18db0cdf9dd1c7b4ac6bc665dcac4f2.jpg

 

I agree with you here and clearly see that this pen merits some more attention.

I have a collections of Mont Blanc that includes a 149. I know how the vintage nibs in vintage pen performs and I love only vintage pens.   

So within this thread I convinces myself this" new Calligraphy MB Nib" is outstanding. It is a wonderful tool in a trained skilled hand.

But  at the same time this pen looks like a TOOL OF CHICKEN SCRATCH in a hand of a "Chicken Scratch  Master Penman " 

Your penman ship doesn't change according to your tools but How many of you have bought a pen just looking at a penmanship of beautiful writing and the way it wrote those scripts? And again  you are very disappointed as your writing with this new pen docent look different than from other writing  of old pens did.

 

Well, Montblanc is not a magical pen to do that miracle but If you can't do things better with a PENCIL , THEN THIS PEN IS A FAILURE and an disappointment to some body.

Even on this point if a person who put the thoughts to own this pen and start to write with, will be ended -up by being a better writer to get more improved writing. It is the spirits and the energy that is transmitted by this pen  :)

Yes this is a nice pen and it will encourage you to learn more about dip pen writing as the warm-up writing.

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On 7/12/2021 at 3:57 PM, Inkyways said:

 

I agree with you here and clearly see that this pen merits some more attention.

I have a collections of Mont Blanc that includes a 149. I know how the vintage nibs in vintage pen performs and I love only vintage pens.   

So within this thread I convinces myself this" new Calligraphy MB Nib" is outstanding. It is a wonderful tool in a trained skilled hand.

But  at the same time this pen looks like a TOOL OF CHICKEN SCRATCH in a hand of a "Chicken Scratch  Master Penman " 

Your penman ship doesn't change according to your tools but How many of you have bought a pen just looking at a penmanship of beautiful writing and the way it wrote those scripts? And again  you are very disappointed as your writing with this new pen docent look different than from other writing  of old pens did.

 

Well, Montblanc is not a magical pen to do that miracle but If you can't do things better with a PENCIL , THEN THIS PEN IS A FAILURE and an disappointment to some body.

Even on this point if a person who put the thoughts to own this pen and start to write with, will be ended -up by being a better writer to get more improved writing. It is the spirits and the energy that is transmitted by this pen  :)

Yes this is a nice pen and it will encourage you to learn more about dip pen writing as the warm-up writing.

 

Dear pen pal, I do not thing that a pen, whichever one you discuss, could be a "failure" or a "toll of chicken scratch" because users can not use it at their best.

 

Examples like those posted in this thread are aimed at showing what a pen is able to do when used in a certain way. It is about potentiality. 

 

I am not supposed to drive a Ducati motorcycle like a World champion, but it is good to know what the motor could do under the care of a "user" more trained than me. This says me to what I can aspire to with exercise and dedication, and says me that the limits of my performances are not due to the "imperfection" of the tool, but to my own skills, which can be improved.  

 

Speaking for myself, during the last fifteen months or so I learnt a lot from my pen, and I discovered several things that the pen is able to do under proper guidance. From the samples posted by others users I learnt not only how I can improve my use of the Calligraphy but also that most of my failures are due to my errors and not to intrinsic limits of the pen itself. 

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I am posting another calligraphic exercise made with the 149 Calligraphy, once again an aphorism of my own on calligraphy.

 

large.1790982480_Montblamc149CalligraphyCharmedheart.jpg.5d4acab03c5b510ca9ad9b04bc1b7ba8.jpg

 

I used for the first time a paper that I consider exceptional. It is an Amalfi paper made by Amatruda, but not one of their more selected and celebrated ones. This is a kind of paper they suggest for use for ink-jet printers - so, I guess, of substandard quality for their parameters, as they consider it not suitable for wedding invitations.

 

The Amatruda paper for ink-jet printers is available in two size, A4 (more or less letter size) and A3 (double the size). The two sizes differ in weight, the A4 being 120 gr. and the A3 150 gr. But the more significative difference - which is not specified in the web page - is that the A3 size is a hand-made laid paper, while the A4 is not laid.

 

I found that the Amatruda laid is superb. The "vergelle" are parallel too the longer side, and the "catenelle" to the shorter side, so that you can use correctly the paper in horizontal at full size, or folded in two if you want it reduced to A4 size. It is beautiful to the touch and very responsive to the nib. This is one of the best paper I ever tried with my Calligraphy!

 

Buying Amatruda paper may be a bit complicated. I found that the web page of "Scuderia del Duca" (https://www.carta-amalfi.com), which is also available in English, is a good door to the Amalfi paper and the Amatruda world. Their service and communication are prompt and excellent.

 

I wrote the text with a Diamine ink of their "Guitar" series, the "Tobacco Sunburst". I read some contrasting reviews of this ink, mostly indicating that it is too much on the dry side. I found it very well-behaved on the Calligraphy, and this confirms my general impressions that - at least with my individual pen - the Calligraphy nib is more suited for relatively "dry" rather than overly "wet" inks. Furthermore, I find the color of this ink a truly tobacco-like, vintage shade, which I like very much.

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1 hour ago, fpupulin said:

I am posting another calligraphic exercise made with the 149 Calligraphy, once again an aphorism of my own on calligraphy.

 

large.1790982480_Montblamc149CalligraphyCharmedheart.jpg.5d4acab03c5b510ca9ad9b04bc1b7ba8.jpg

 

I used for the first time a paper that I consider exceptional. It is an Amalfi paper made by Amatruda, but not one of their more selected and celebrated ones. This is a kind of paper they suggest for use for ink-jet printers - so, I guess, of substandard quality for their parameters, as they consider it not suitable for wedding invitations.

 

The Amatruda paper for ink-jet printers is available in two size, A4 (more or less letter size) and A3 (double the size). The two sizes differ in weight, the A4 being 120 gr. and the A3 150 gr. But the more significative difference - which is not specified in the web page - is that the A3 size is a hand-made laid paper, while the A4 is not laid.

 

I found that the Amatruda laid is superb. The "vergelle" are parallel too the longer side, and the "catenelle" to the shorter side, so that you can use correctly the paper in horizontal at full size, or folded in two if you want it reduced to A4 size. It is beautiful to the touch and very responsive to the nib. This is one of the best paper I ever tried with my Calligraphy!

 

Buying Amatruda paper may be a bit complicated. I found that the web page of "Scuderia del Duca" (https://www.carta-amalfi.com), which is also available in English, is a good door to the Amalfi paper and the Amatruda world. Their service and communication are prompt and excellent.

 

I wrote the text with a Diamine ink of their "Guitar" series, the "Tobacco Sunburst". I read some contrasting reviews of this ink, mostly indicating that it is too much on the dry side. I found it very well-behaved on the Calligraphy, and this confirms my general impressions that - at least with my individual pen - the Calligraphy nib is more suited for relatively "dry" rather than overly "wet" inks. Furthermore, I find the color of this ink a truly tobacco-like, vintage shade, which I like very much.

 

Thank you the "Scuderia del Duca" reference.

 

Amalfi paper has a nice feel to it, though it may not work smoothly with all inks and pens- just my extremely limited experience with only one 'Il Papiro' notebook. That said I hope to try out a notebook and some inkjet paper from "Scuderia del Duca"!

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On 7/15/2021 at 11:11 AM, fpupulin said:

I am posting another calligraphic exercise made with the 149 Calligraphy, once again an aphorism of my own on calligraphy.

 

large.1790982480_Montblamc149CalligraphyCharmedheart.jpg.5d4acab03c5b510ca9ad9b04bc1b7ba8.jpg

 

I used for the first time a paper that I consider exceptional. It is an Amalfi paper made by Amatruda, but not one of their more selected and celebrated ones. This is a kind of paper they suggest for use for ink-jet printers - so, I guess, of substandard quality for their parameters, as they consider it not suitable for wedding invitations.

 

The Amatruda paper for ink-jet printers is available in two size, A4 (more or less letter size) and A3 (double the size). The two sizes differ in weight, the A4 being 120 gr. and the A3 150 gr. But the more significative difference - which is not specified in the web page - is that the A3 size is a hand-made laid paper, while the A4 is not laid.

 

I found that the Amatruda laid is superb. The "vergelle" are parallel too the longer side, and the "catenelle" to the shorter side, so that you can use correctly the paper in horizontal at full size, or folded in two if you want it reduced to A4 size. It is beautiful to the touch and very responsive to the nib. This is one of the best paper I ever tried with my Calligraphy!

 

Buying Amatruda paper may be a bit complicated. I found that the web page of "Scuderia del Duca" (https://www.carta-amalfi.com), which is also available in English, is a good door to the Amalfi paper and the Amatruda world. Their service and communication are prompt and excellent.

 

I wrote the text with a Diamine ink of their "Guitar" series, the "Tobacco Sunburst". I read some contrasting reviews of this ink, mostly indicating that it is too much on the dry side. I found it very well-behaved on the Calligraphy, and this confirms my general impressions that - at least with my individual pen - the Calligraphy nib is more suited for relatively "dry" rather than overly "wet" inks. Furthermore, I find the color of this ink a truly tobacco-like, vintage shade, which I like very much.


I second the comments here with regard to Amatruda papers. They may be my favo(u)rite papers for writing with a fountain pen. They have almost no bleed through (only with heavy application by the wettest of pens does one occasionally get a spot on the back of the paper), are very well behaved with a variety of inks, and have a lovely surface texture (NB: your mind will sometimes gather a bit of fiber, but I find the problem occurs most when writing with a heavy hand.

 

All of the Amatruda papers are wonderful to the touch, and they are my go-to papers for personal correspondence.

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Well, after a year of um'ing and ar'ing about this pen, I've pulled the trigger on it and will arrive this week. I concur with others that Franco really shows what this pen is capable of, simply beautiful. For me, it will be a purchase in recognition of a couple of significant life events so one that I can't wait to learn how to use better.

 

On a side note, I know this has been done to death in this and other threads but is there a consensus around some of the top (non-permanent) inks to use? I was going to try MB royal blue and MB Midnight blue as first stop. Any other mainstream blue inks you would recommend?

Short cuts make delays, but inns make longer ones.
Frodo Baggins, The Fellowship of the Ring, A Short Cut to Mushrooms

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2 hours ago, Ceelo said:

Well, after a year of um'ing and ar'ing about this pen, I've pulled the trigger on it and will arrive this week. I concur with others that Franco really shows what this pen is capable of, simply beautiful. For me, it will be a purchase in recognition of a couple of significant life events so one that I can't wait to learn how to use better.

 

On a side note, I know this has been done to death in this and other threads but is there a consensus around some of the top (non-permanent) inks to use? I was going to try MB royal blue and MB Midnight blue as first stop. Any other mainstream blue inks you would recommend?

I wish you well with your new pen. If you look through this topic, there are many posts showing many different inks with varying results. I have settled on using MB Permanent Blue or Permanent Black. Each works well, but the black tends to smudge. I do clean my pen between ink fills by rinsing it with cold tap water. The permanent inks take longer to flush clean, but the pens do eventually discharge almost-clear water. 

 

I have been perfectly happy with the MB permanent inks, so I haven't ventured further. I wrote to Montblanc USA about using MB permanent inks in their Calligraphy pens. They discouraged this practice, but say that any other MB ink will work just fine. I copied that correspondence and posted it in this topic, too. 

 

Since buying this pen, it has been my most-used fountain pen. Earlier today, i was practicing some writing using Franco's post from July 7 as my guide. Please enjoy using this amazing writing instrument and let us know what inks you use and how they work out. 

 

If you haven't already seen this topic:

 

You should read it. @Martty had some difficulty with his Calligraphy 149 which was resolved when he started using MB Permanent Blue. 

"One can not waste time worrying about small minds . . . If we were normal, we'd still be using free ball point pens." —Bo Bo Olson "I already own more ink than a rational person can use in a lifetime." —Waski_the_Squirrel

I'm still trying to figure out how to list all my pens down here.

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8 hours ago, Ceelo said:

Well, after a year of um'ing and ar'ing about this pen, I've pulled the trigger on it and will arrive this week. I concur with others that Franco really shows what this pen is capable of, simply beautiful. For me, it will be a purchase in recognition of a couple of significant life events so one that I can't wait to learn how to use better.

 

On a side note, I know this has been done to death in this and other threads but is there a consensus around some of the top (non-permanent) inks to use? I was going to try MB royal blue and MB Midnight blue as first stop. Any other mainstream blue inks you would recommend?


You won’t regret it, my friend!

 

As you probably saw, I ventured with several Diamine brown inks, namely Golden Brown, Ancient Copper and Tobacco Sunburst. The three are, to my judgment, a bit on the dry side, and they work flawlessly in my Calligraphy, as they allow for the very fine strokes the nib is able to do.

Wet inks invariably broaden the thin strokes, so they sacrifice in part the line variation that I appreciate so much of the Calligraphy nib.

As others have written before, the Calligraphy nib is perhaps a bit less “instinctive” than others at first sight. Be patient, Ceelo, and it will probably take - as many of us experienced - one of the first places in your pen collection as using time is concerned.

Have fun!

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14 hours ago, Ceelo said:

Well, after a year of um'ing and ar'ing about this pen, I've pulled the trigger on it and will arrive this week. I concur with others that Franco really shows what this pen is capable of, simply beautiful. For me, it will be a purchase in recognition of a couple of significant life events so one that I can't wait to learn how to use better.

 

On a side note, I know this has been done to death in this and other threads but is there a consensus around some of the top (non-permanent) inks to use? I was going to try MB royal blue and MB Midnight blue as first stop. Any other mainstream blue inks you would recommend?

 

Welcome to the club! And may you enjoy it in good health

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9 hours ago, fpupulin said:

Just for completeness:

 

large.1167819149_Apenapoem(2)FP.jpg.b00d5c315fb7599c331b094af90d3d19.jpg

 

I first spotted this as an image and wrote a comment there. And my first thought was that most likely this was the first ever poem composed in praise of what at first glance seems a humble fountain pen!

 

Truly remarkable, I would say.

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On 7/18/2021 at 12:32 AM, Ceelo said:

Well, after a year of um'ing and ar'ing about this pen, I've pulled the trigger on it and will arrive this week. I concur with others that Franco really shows what this pen is capable of, simply beautiful. For me, it will be a purchase in recognition of a couple of significant life events so one that I can't wait to learn how to use better.

 

On a side note, I know this has been done to death in this and other threads but is there a consensus around some of the top (non-permanent) inks to use? I was going to try MB royal blue and MB Midnight blue as first stop. Any other mainstream blue inks you would recommend?

 

Dear Ceelo, congrats on your new pen. A most wonderful purchase that I think you will not regret, although it might require some patience in getting to master the unique character of the Calligraphy. As @Frank C mentions, I had some initial trouble with skipping. I used MB midnight blue and royal blue but the skipping did not stop. Since I’ve used MB permanent blue, however, the skipping has disappeared completely. It is a very nice ink to use and cleans out very well to the point that clear water is being discharged, as Frank C also mentioned. I do take care to flush with water after each new filling of ink, just to be on the safe side. Cheers, Marrty.

 

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On 7/10/2021 at 9:34 PM, Frank C said:

As promised, here are a few photos of my Brother P-Touch labeler and its results:

 

 

 

Some of my labels. They adhere well to the plastic, but remove easily and without damage after being on for years. "CP" stands for Cult Pens, "DD" stands for their Deep Dark exclusive Series of Diamine inks. "Pen won't fill" is because I used paper labels with strings to identify my pens needing service. After the housekeeper cleaned, the labels were in a little pile, no longer connected to the pens. 

 

 

 

I have a spare MB 149 cap, so I made a "Calligraphy" label for it. I also discovered that my labeler has a built-in Calligraphy font. I am using a 149 Calligraphy to prop it up. 

 

IMG_0491.thumb.jpeg.b1ba7cbfaae42d30bf72712054a191c6.jpeg

 

The prototype. It is on one of my original MBs with the 14C fine nib. At some point, MB changed the threads on the caps; this one is the older version. The background is one of my Moleskines that I use for Calligraphy 149 practice, per @fpupulin's recommendation. 

 

For me, this is a less-expensive and less-elegant way to distinguish my Calligraphy 149 from the other pens. But it doesn't require a trip to Texas to accomplish.

 

Brother makes another labeler that connects to a computer and functions as a printer. I would guess that Franco's connected 8s artwork could be printed with that. Brother also makes a "Gold Print on Black Tape" for my labeler:

 

In a week or two, I will peel the label off to see if there is any damage to the MB cap. I suspect that the "Precious Resin" won't be damaged. 

 

 

 

I reached out to my local gold smith, and enquired about the possibility of having a small copy of the gold sticker with the calligraphic swirl made in solid gold, with the swirl in black enamel. 

 

He said it's entirely possible, and he'll get back to me with a quote after the summer holiday. 

 

I will update once I have had it made and stuck to the cap. I know it's the expensive way to go, but hey, it's not like collecting Montblancs is cheap anyway. 

 

 

 - P. 

 

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This promises to be a fine sticker, albeit expensive…

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I received Montblanc Permanent Blue and the new writer's edition Scarlet Red ordered from MB directly. It took under 24 hours from clicking "order" to having it in my hands. I mean they send from northern Italy and I'm from a neighbouring country living relatively close by, but that's insane.

 

I haven't tried scarlet red yet, but man oh man permanent blue is fantastic. If I didn't read praise for it in this thread I would have never, ever bought it!

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56 minutes ago, invisuu said:

I received Montblanc Permanent Blue and the new writer's edition Scarlet Red ordered from MB directly. It took under 24 hours from clicking "order" to having it in my hands. I mean they send from northern Italy and I'm from a neighbouring country living relatively close by, but that's insane.

 

I haven't tried scarlet red yet, but man oh man permanent blue is fantastic. If I didn't read praise for it in this thread I would have never, ever bought it!

Great to hear!

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On 7/23/2021 at 1:12 PM, invisuu said:

I haven't tried scarlet red yet, but man oh man permanent blue is fantastic. If I didn't read praise for it in this thread I would have never, ever bought it!

I purchased MB Permanent Blue and Permanent Black when I first saw them in a boutique in 2013. I opened the black at the time and thought, "OK, it's black." I never opened the blue until my Calligraphy 149 arrived. I think that the nano particles in the permanent inks are well suited to use in a flexible nib in the Calligraphy 149. 

 

As @como said previously in this topic, "Absolutely!! And I bet that Franco singlehandedly increased MB Permanent Blue and Permanent Black ink sales by 5,000%! Why else would one go buy a “boring” AND PERMANENT ink and put it in any expensive pen?! 😀"

"One can not waste time worrying about small minds . . . If we were normal, we'd still be using free ball point pens." —Bo Bo Olson "I already own more ink than a rational person can use in a lifetime." —Waski_the_Squirrel

I'm still trying to figure out how to list all my pens down here.

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He he he...

 

But, seriously, I took the opportunity of my Italian trip to buy another bottle of Blue Permanent, which in Costa Rica is available only occasionally.

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Here it is! I love Montblanc Scarlet Red. It goes from orange to a deep "brick" red, depending on the stroke. It has great surface tension, as can be seen from the figures 8. This is despite the pen basically being empty at writing this. I still miss Corn Poppy Red, but this makes me feel better a little bit.

 

Permanent blue looks amazing in my view. The shading is incredible and it's the only ink I've tested thus far that shades in this pen. Not as great surface tension, but not an issue during regular writing.

 

Please keep in mind the photo is taken under yellow light and the paper is off white / "ivory".

 

642-EE48-C-349-D-49-C8-A3-F3-0-BD7-B393-

 

Now, onto sad news...despite emptying and thoroughly flushing the pen just 1 day after filling it with Permanent blue, it seems to have stained my ink window. There are actually tiny particles embedded into the ink window; I'm guessing a chemical reaction. I can not clean it out. Has this happened to anyone else? The ink is new, with the updated packaging design, so it can't be old and faulty. Should I contact MB about it?


B14-A5885-F528-479-D-B650-927-CDD5-A07-F

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