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christof

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Here comes a group picture of the most important pens which I was able to ad to my collection in 2017:


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1. Pelikan 100N, first year model

2. Pelikan 100N, Gray, ca. 1950

3. Pelikan 101N, Tortoise, ca. 1950

4. Pelikan 100 with 14 carats overlay by Georg Lauer, 1930's

5.+6. Pelikan 400/450 Set in Gray, ca. 1950

7. OMAS Extra, 1940's

8. Waterman's #92, Lizard pattern, 1930's

9. Monte Rosa (Dimmler), 1940's

10. Böhler Glorex, 1930's


C.
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#4 seems like a very significant pen. Congratulations on a great 2017.

 

 

Here comes a group picture of the most important pens which I was able to ad to my collection in 2017:
1. Pelikan 100N, first year model
2. Pelikan 100N, Gray, ca. 1950
3. Pelikan 101N, Tortoise, ca. 1950
4. Pelikan 100 with 14 carats overlay by Georg Lauer, 1930's
5.+6. Pelikan 400/450 Set in Gray, ca. 1950
7. OMAS Extra, 1940's
8. Waterman's #92, Lizard pattern, 1930's
9. Monte Rosa (Dimmler), 1940's
10. Böhler Glorex, 1930's
C.

 

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Indeed, the Pelikan 100 made by Lauer is an interesting item, although I am not yet sure about it's worth from the point of view of collecting, since it is not really a "true" Pelikan. Commonly, collectors prefer pens with overlays made by the pen manufacturing company. Anyway, here are some additional pictures and a comparions to the "real" solid Gold Pelikan 112:

 

38028747064_ed93fa7b4f_o.jpg

 

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24980014728_b7e9e270fd_o.jpg

 

23895322787_a29a97f0c5_o.jpg

 

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As you can see, on the Lauer is much more material than on the "original" 112.

 

38759446781_1cb95d7115_o.jpg

 

C.

 

PS: I really like #3 as well, it's a quite nice pen with a nice nib. Thank you.

Edited by christof
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I really would not mind finding one of the Lauer ones especially if it was in as good a condition as yours, Cristof. Like I have said before, that is just lovely from the design point of view. <3

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"As you can see, on the Lauer is much more material than on the "original" 112."

I once had a chance to disassemble Lauer's Pelikan 100.It turned out that gold sleeve is paper thin slid onto the steel tube.So, it is not impossible to be even less gold there than on original Pelikan.

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"As you can see, on the Lauer is much more material than on the "original" 112."

I once had a chance to disassemble Lauer's Pelikan 100.It turned out that gold sleeve is paper thin slid onto the steel tube.So, it is not impossible to be even less gold there than on original Pelikan.

 

Interesting that you mention this. According to a note by Tom Westerich (see here: https://www.penboard.de/shop/searchdb?srchvaluedb=maenner&db_seller=0) I disassembled my pen completely (I also parted the sleeve from the barrel), but I could not detect any other material or tubes hidden by the solid gold overlay. The magnetic test was negative as well. If there is a carrier metal ( and I couldn't discover some), it is not steel. Maybe I have to check again...

C.

Edited by christof
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Hi Christof ,

Thanks for shearing your impressive Pelikan 100 collection.

The Lauer version surely is stunning , never heard of it, congratulations !

Francis

PS :

1- The pen being longer, is the piston stroke also longer ?

2 - Was this overly made:/installed in Switzerland or in Germany?

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Hi Francis

Thank you. The pen is a basic Pelikan 100 with overlay. That's probably what makes it seeming bigger than normal 100's.

Georg Lauer is a company from Pforzheim, Germany. It does still exist.

Christof

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I found some notes on that Lauer Pelikan: after dissasembly and measures of Binde only: gold+steel sleeve 0.35mm thick.Gold 0.15 mm (!) steel 0.2 mm.Gold weight 1g 600mg, gold+steel 4g 200mg.Steel must have acted as a potential hit support with that thin layer of gold.Unlike Montblanc that rather used some sort of tar to glue metal to ebonite, Pelikan had it snuggly fit.

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Thanks for these interesting informations. It seems that I have to disassemble the Lauer again and have a closer look. The binde was not glued to the barrel. As you said: a snug fit. Under the gold tube I saw the green celluloid binde as a layer between, but no second metal tube. Need to check this again.

 

Original overlays made by Pelikan had indeed a black tarlike material to glue the thin gold bindes in place onto the barrel. This is a picture of a 111 with a broken barrel that I once have repaired:

 

10904187886_8eceb5c585_h.jpg

 

C.

Edited by christof
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  • 2 weeks later...
Got a new pencil. Doesn't look spectacular, but is, at least for me. Maybe, some of you are familiar with the Fixpencil by Caran d'Ache? It's a family of leadholders, developped for technical drawings. Here a picture of my humble collection:




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picture most probably already shown here




But here comes a picture of the very first (!) of Caran d'Aches Fixpencil from 1930:




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As already said: doesn't look too fancy, but in fact, these are incredible rare. Not many existing examples are known. One is in the permanent exhibiton of the Museum of Desing Zurich:








...and this one on my desk!




C.




PS: I know, only collectors can understand my excitement about a boring black leadholder....which is a piece of history!
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Now that is cool! I have a bunch of Fixpencils myself and love their design. Great to see the first version that came out before it was "streamlined" for production efficiency and whatnot. Really neat. :)

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Very nice! Not boring at all. I prefer the plain 1930 model to the later ones. Does the whole end-cap/clip assembly depress to advance the lead?

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...Does the whole end-cap/clip assembly depress to advance the lead?

 

Yes.

 

Actually, the function of the first Fixpencil is almost the same as of the modern ones:

 

 

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function drawing of early Fixpencil

 

 

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function drawing and model overview of modern Fixpencils

 

 

C.

Edited by christof
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