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Urushi Diy For Beginners (Tutorial)


MichalK
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Hi,

 

I've put into one article some information how to start with urushi on fountain pens.

- tools you will need (from surface to brushes and abrasives)

- materials, types of lacquer

- basic practice advice

- "recipe" for basic tamenuri

 

https://tamenuri.com/how-to-start-with-urushi/

 

I hope you will find it useful.

 

Right now due to COVID it may be tricky to order some of these products. In Europe all of them are available at DICTUM. Japanese shops (Watanabe Shoten, Kato Kohei) will not deliver right now to most destinations (Japan Post suspended deliveries).

 

 

Michal

URUSHI Studio, bespoke urushi fountain pens


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WOW! Thank you so much for making this beautiful tutorial!

Children think adults have all the freedom and adults think children have
all the freedom.
 

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Bless you!

 

I'm wondering if urushi is the way to bring back to life all those rather dull, rubbed, oxidised black hard rubber pens I've picked up over the years. What do you reckon?

 

And by the way - what's the absolute minimum you can start with? I've built my urushi wishlist at Dictum, but it addes up to pretty nearly EUR 400....

Edited by amk

Too many pens, too little time!

http://fountainpenlove.blogspot.fr/

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WOW! Thank you so much for making this beautiful tutorial!

 

Thank you !

 

Bless you!

 

I'm wondering if urushi is the way to bring back to life all those rather dull, rubbed, oxidised black hard rubber pens I've picked up over the years. What do you reckon?

 

And by the way - what's the absolute minimum you can start with? I've built my urushi wishlist at Dictum, but it addes up to pretty nearly EUR 400....

 

 

Dull old pens - absolutely YES. If it not to be rescued any other way - urushi can not just save it but also transform into something new, and beautiful. Or at least interesting ;))) It applies not just to ebonite, but also "tired", heavily scratched resin pens, like Montblancs etc. One thing is important - removable clip, otherwise you will not be able to lacquer the cap. Other trim is to be masked, but clip that is non removable, sucks in this area.

 

As for budget - ine EU (Dictum) this is the budget unfortunately. It does not even include abrasives (other than tonoko and migaki) or brushes. But as I wrote in article - start with Ki Urushi and do some fuki. it's how I started, and learned a lot.

But this is a rabbit hole. Right now I have over 10 different lacquers, several hake, different golds etc.

Michal

URUSHI Studio, bespoke urushi fountain pens


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I'm ahead on the gold, as I have gold leaf and composition metal leaf for my calligraphy and antiques restoration :-)

 

Okay, I think I'll spend the money. A lot of the old pens only have accomodation clips so I'm happy to get going on them!

Too many pens, too little time!

http://fountainpenlove.blogspot.fr/

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I'm wondering if urushi is the way to bring back to life all those rather dull, rubbed, oxidised black hard rubber pens I've picked up over the years. What do you reckon?

If you coat it with Urushi, you will have a different pen like new, but you will destroy maker marks and texture if any. And you need to be familiar with Urushi, a matter that you will not learn in half an hour. If yo want to restore it to get the same pen but newer, I would advice dipping it one hour in chlorine (10% + 90% tap water) after taking off the metallic parts, then polishing and oiling. Two different ways for two different results.

Edited by Pierre---

Web shop: Rue du Stylo

Instagram: rue_du_stylo

 

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Pierre, these are real beat up pens. No imprints left. In many cases third tier anyway but some with quite nice nibs.

 

My nice Watermans are not getting urushi treatment! No, they'll get polished! Thanks for the tip on chlorine, I will give that a try.

Too many pens, too little time!

http://fountainpenlove.blogspot.fr/

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If you coat it with Urushi, you will have a different pen like new, but you will destroy maker marks and texture if any. And you need to be familiar with Urushi, a matter that you will not learn in half an hour. If yo want to restore it to get the same pen but newer, I would advice dipping it one hour in chlorine (10% + 90% tap water) after taking off the metallic parts, then polishing and oiling. Two different ways for two different results.

 

 

You are right, that is why it is a good solution for really bad shape pens - deep scratches, even cracks etc. But if you want you can lacquer a brand new Montblanc 149 calligraphy ;)

And yes - you will not learn it in an hour. Just basics took me 2 months of practice, after several months of studying, gathering materials, etc.

Michal

URUSHI Studio, bespoke urushi fountain pens


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Urushi can be both: very harmful or completely safe. Cured urushi, on fountain pens, kitchen utensils, lacquerware, jewellery - is safe. On the other hand raw, fresh urushi, or not cured fully can be very dangerous to some people, and for most of them harmful. The main ingredient of urushi lacquer - urushiol, responsible for its important properties (polymerisation) is a strong allergen.

About urushi rash in my newest video:
https://youtu.be/qb-UxwqIKRo

Michal

URUSHI Studio, bespoke urushi fountain pens


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So I just put in a nice big order at Dictum. I rationalised it to myself; I can buy a new Pelikan 600 and a couple of bottles of ink, or I can get started in urushi :-)

 

 

haha I started exactly same way ;) Dictum is good local supplier (EU), but for serious shopping nothing beats Japan (Watanabe, Kato Kohei i some more). Have fun and stay safe with urushi ;)

Michal

URUSHI Studio, bespoke urushi fountain pens


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