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Parker 88 With Urushi Laquer Finish


longhandwriter

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IMG_3523.jpegHello and as usual I am looking for help, in this case to identify the finish on a Parker 88. The pen was made in the UK and has a IIL date code, so second qtr 1993.

The pen has a green lacquer finish over a metal barrel and the gold splash is sitting on top of this finish and is not, as has been suggested to me, breaking through from underneath the green. This is not 'brassing' as the gold is three dimensional and under 10X magnification this can clearly be seen.

If anyone knows what the finish is called or has seen it it before I would be very pleased to be advised

 

Many thanks in advance for any information you may have.

 

IMG_3524 (1).jpegIMG_3525 (1).jpegIMG_3526 (1).jpeg

 

 

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Judging by the photos that looks like it could be Vison Foncé. It was a finish used for some other models too like Sonnet and the Premiere of that time.

Happiness is a real Montblanc...

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Lacquer Gold Dust, also available in black.

 

Google brings up some results.

 

 

Are the Lacquer Gold Dust and Vison Foncé (Chinese Lacquer) two different finishes?

Happiness is a real Montblanc...

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I have done a bit of research based on the helpful information I have received. The pen does indeed look like the Vision Foncé (dark vision) finish, but the pictures I have seen on the web show the finish on dark coloured pens, usually brown - hence dark vision. The pen I have is in a mid green colour and I have not managed to find a picture of it anywhere. Almost all the pens with this finish are Sonnets and I believe that I have either seen or owned one or more of these pens in the past, although they were described as Chinese Laque with no mention of the gold

The Gold Dust finish which is mentioned is I think a generic name made up to describe the finish although I am not certain of this. In any event I am going to contact a representative of Parker and ask if they can identify this exact colour and pattern.

Many thanks to all who have replied to my question

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  • 2 years later...

I know this is an older question, but I am also looking for information on this finish. I have the blue and black with the gold dust pattern. I collect 88 and have just about every finish. I have never seen the green with gold dust and would love to find one. I will be researching the finish and if I find anything will report findings. If you happen to come across another green one please do let me know, thank you

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I have got many 88s and Rialtos in my Parker collection though not every finish ever manufactured by Parker. 

I have known about existence of 88s in Gold Dust finish for years but seen only Lacquer Black Gold Dust.

I am still hunting for one for my collection but it is very difficult to find in decent condition. 

Much time ago I asked two former Newhaven guys about some accurate information on this particular finish but they were unable to provide any useful details. 

All the best is only beginning now...

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1 hour ago, baz666 said:

About a year ago, I did manage to find a set in Blue.

 

1115683102_P88BlueLacqueGoldDust1.thumb.JPG.846586317e51efceefa4106ea04bfee7.JPG

 

Thanks for that, very helpful to know. 

What was the pens conditions and how much did you pay for them then?

 

All the best is only beginning now...

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It looks like the basic technique of "Ma-ki-e".

 If it is "U-ru-shi", it must be separated from light rays (mainly ultraviolet rays) and protected from drying.

 

 

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43 minutes ago, Number99 said:

and protected from drying.

 

Please explain.

Add lightness and simplicate.

 

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30 minutes ago, Karmachanic said:

 

Please explain.

It needs to be protected from dryness.

 The reason is that "U-ru-shi" needs a certain amount of moisture.

 When it dries, cracks are likely to occur.

 Japan also has an intermittently dry weather environment in winter.

 Normally, "U-ru-shi" is wrapped in a soft silky cloth and stored in a "paulownia box" for special occasions.

 

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41 minutes ago, Number99 said:

When it dries, cracks are likely to occur.

 

I've not heard of this regarding fountain pens, which, of course, does not mean that it is not so. Might this be substrate dependent?  Bamboo for instance, which may shrink/expand due to changing humidity.  Fountain pens not so much.

 

Apologies for derailing the thread.  I'll stop after this post.

Add lightness and simplicate.

 

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7 hours ago, Karmachanic said:

 

I've not heard of this regarding fountain pens, which, of course, does not mean that it is not so. Might this be substrate dependent?  Bamboo for instance, which may shrink/expand due to changing humidity.  Fountain pens not so much.

 

Apologies for derailing the thread.  I'll stop after this post.

https://www.pilot.co.jp/support/fountain/post_33.html#:~:text=漆(蒔絵)製品は、,で乾拭きしてください。

 

 Please browse in the translation mode of your browser.

 

 "U-ru-shi" and the underlying material must be explained separately.

 Here, we will explain "U-ru-shi". I can't find a reason why the management is different only for fountain pens. In that case, it is assumed that it is not "U-ru-shi".

 

 "U-ru-shi" has been improved in recent years to make it more durable (painting the exterior walls of temples and shrines, etc.).

 However, the Pilot still does not erase this note.

 

 Also, these explanations are not all about "U-ru-shi".

 

 

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I believe that Parker may have used a commercial laquer, and not urushi laquer as found on fine art pens like Nakaya or the artistic maki-e pens from various companies.

-- Joel -- "I collect expensive and time-consuming hobbies."

 

INK (noun): A villainous compound of tannogallate of iron, gum-arabic and water,

chiefly used to facilitate the infection of idiocy and promote intellectual crime.

(from The Devil's Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce)

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1 hour ago, Kalessin said:

I believe that Parker may have used a commercial laquer, and not urushi laquer as found on fine art pens like Nakaya or the artistic maki-e pens from various companies.

I didn't know that, but it may be.

 The Hira-makie-like pattern on the cap looks the same. Fallen gold powder cannot form the same pattern.

 

 

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  • 7 months later...

16701097693909036422006474513525.thumb.jpg.db794d88e787cae14d159be3a05eff81.jpg16701097494096784232693114959866.thumb.jpg.96a7acea12ecf35e7c43c00ebd420ec0.jpg1203221144b.thumb.jpg.c4c7f9d87f4759a85db33cf1f2d8157e.jpg1203221144a.thumb.jpg.fb434aa7a935a349877939d518778fe4.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpgHere are some pictures of my 88's. Tried to get better pictures of the more rare ones. Plaque Aqua, Lava and Dusk. The two Aqua's , one is a lot more green than the other! And the Black and Blue Gold Dust. Have not been able to find a Green Gold Dust yet. One I bought from a guy in Germany and the other gold dust came from Israel. I don't know anything else about them since my post a few months ago I just came back across this searching and thought I would share pictures if anyone is still looking . Sorry for so many pictures I can't figure out how to fix it 1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144b.thumb.jpg.c4c7f9d87f4759a85db33cf1f2d8157e.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg1203221144.thumb.jpg.102dff01a65e53518f36e1c78ab8c756.jpg

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Marvelous collection of 88s and Rialtos! :) 

I am still looking for those rare ones with Gold Dust finish... and also struggling to find Red Lacquer one in NOS condition...

Interestingly, some early 88s command quite high price nowadays...

All the best is only beginning now...

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Those are all so lovely! I love my blue 88 Place Vendôme and am drooling over the blue and aqua gold dust pens. 

Top 5 of 23 currently inked pens:

Namiki Origami Tradition maki-e Penguin F, Pilot Iroshizuku Ku-Jaku

Sailor X Sakazaki Penguin Pro Gear Slim MF, Sailor Manyo Konagi

Grey Parker 45 GT, Octanium F nib, Pelikan 4001 Blue-Black

Platinum Hibiscus SF short-long, Platinum Green

Indigo Bronze TWSBI Eco 1.1 Stub, De Atramentis Columbia Blue-Copper 

always looking for penguin fountain pens and stationery 

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