Jump to content

Shimmering Inks And Clogging


dashreeve

Recommended Posts

I've been buying way too many shimmering inks lately, and I can't get enough of them. I have a few of the very inexpensive Jinhao 992s that I convert to eyedropper and swap the nib with Goulet stub nibs. I'm using the inks in a Moonman C1, and several PanBBS pens as well. A bit hesitant t use in my nicer pens.

 

It seems that some clog more / faster than others. Any tips on shimmering inks that clog less, or tips for cleaning / maintenance?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 15
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • dashreeve

    5

  • kestrel

    2

  • corniche

    2

  • Noihvo

    1

Hi Dashreeve,

 

Shimmering inks contain solids; i.e., plastic or metallic bits of glitter, so clogging is an inherent risk- it's the nature of the beast.

 

My recommendation would be NOT to eyedropper your pens with the stuff- that's TOO MUCH glitter ink. It's better to use it in small, controlled portions; use the pen regularly and flush the pen frequently; e.g., once a week.

 

 

Sean :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

Thank you Our Lady of Prompt Succor & St. Jude.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The more effective the cap is at preventing ink evaporation when the pen is unused, the less likely clogging is going to occur. Some $5 pens are pretty good at that, as are some $50 and $500 pens. Nineteen of my (your pens, so it's up to you to know them well.

 

I have a twentieth shimmer ink in an FPR Himalaya v1 pen right now, and that's proving to be a bad idea, but I don't think there is enough of that ink in the converter worth salvaging, and a pen that doesn't have an effective cap is fairly worthless to me personally to bother cleaning it out in a hurry or redeploying it with some other ink (that's still going to dry out in the pen).

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct, and valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good points about the eyedroppers / good sealing caps. Mainly seems to catch in two of the 5 with the shimmering inks, and I think it might have a lot to do with the caps. I don’t mod frequent cleaning for the two cloggers. I also just diluted my magenta shimmering ink with some lubricated cactus fruit with great results. No more clogging in that one and seems to have just as much shimmer even when diluted.

 

Thanks a lot to the help!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been buying way too many shimmering inks lately, and I can't get enough of them. I have a few of the very inexpensive Jinhao 992s that I convert to eyedropper and swap the nib with Goulet stub nibs. I'm using the inks in a Moonman C1, and several PanBBS pens as well. A bit hesitant t use in my nicer pens.

 

It seems that some clog more / faster than others. Any tips on shimmering inks that clog less, or tips for cleaning / maintenance?

My shimmer ink supply is limited to a few colors. They only go in pens that can be easily and thoroughly cleaned. For me that is converter fillers and the venerable Esterbrook J. Following use the nib unit is cleaned in an ultrasonic bath and flushed with an ear syringe. The converter/Estie sac gets flushed with a syringe and a blunt needle.

Dave Campbell
Retired Science Teacher and Active Pen Addict
Every day is a chance to reduce my level of ignorance.

fpn_1425200643__fpn_1425160066__super_pi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have two shimmers. I've pretty much restrict them to nibs that are broad and wet. Also, seems like if I'm writing a letter, the shimmer fades out half way down the page, even if I do keep shaking my pen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My shimmer ink supply is limited to a few colors. They only go in pens that can be easily and thoroughly cleaned. For me that is converter fillers and the venerable Esterbrook J. Following use the nib unit is cleaned in an ultrasonic bath and flushed with an ear syringe. The converter/Estie sac gets flushed with a syringe and a blunt needle.

Hi Kestrel,

 

I never would have thought of a lever filler sac pen as something that's easy to clean: more power to you. 👍

 

For pens, I would recommend something from Noodlers or TWSBI; something that can be completely disassembled and thoroughly flushed clean.

 

I use a TWSBI 580 with the Bulletproof black and a Noodlers Konrad with Diamine Shimmer Gold, (I forget its actual name).

 

 

Sean :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

Thank you Our Lady of Prompt Succor & St. Jude.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have discussed the clogging issue of shimmer inks with Diamine. Their response was that if the pen becomes cogged with shimmer particles to flush the pen and refill.

 

You may take the view that only having part use of a fill of ink suggests that the ink is not fit for purpose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good points. I am definitely using it in pens that have easy nib / feed removal and broad or stub nibs. Might experiment more with the diluting thing, I have some colors that are pretty close to all my shimmer inks.

Edited by dashreeve
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Sailor Profit Junior has been inked with Sailor pigment blue (problematic in some pens) since I bought it last summer, it still writes unfailingly at the first touch to the page. The LeCoule Smug mentioned has the same nib/feed/cap seal but with flat-top styling and pearlescent plastics, the cigar shaped Profit Jr. with transparent barrel colors runs $20-30, LeCoule $30-40.

 

...or you could get a Platinum Century #3776, the big brag about this updated version is that the new cap design (screw cap only) seals exceptionally well ;)

David-

 

So many restoration projects...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Sailor Profit Junior has been inked with Sailor pigment blue (problematic in some pens) since I bought it last summer, it still writes unfailingly at the first touch to the page. The LeCoule Smug mentioned has the same nib/feed/cap seal but with flat-top styling and pearlescent plastics, the cigar shaped Profit Jr. with transparent barrel colors runs $20-30, LeCoule $30-40.

 

...or you could get a Platinum Century #3776, the big brag about this updated version is that the new cap design (screw cap only) seals exceptionally well ;)

I've been wanting a 3776 with a music nib for a long time.....so that is very tempting!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Kestrel,

 

I never would have thought of a lever filler sac pen as something that's easy to clean: more power to you.

 

For pens, I would recommend something from Noodlers or TWSBI; something that can be completely disassembled and thoroughly flushed clean.

 

I use a TWSBI 580 with the Bulletproof black and a Noodlers Konrad with Diamine Shimmer Gold, (I forget its actual name).

 

 

Sean :)

User grade Esties, only. Remove nib to flush with syringe and/or drop nib/feed in plastic film can filled with water for ultrasonic bath. Take 10 mL syringe with blunt tip needle and CAREFULLY flush out sac. It works and it's easy. I have never even thought of putting shimmer ink in any vintage pen except for the Sherman tank of the fountain pen world.

 

I did end up with one vintage Burgundy Marble Parker Challenger with shimmer ink in it but I wasn't the one who filled it with the stuff. I found the pen at a flea market and did the standard inspection and cleaning and resac. When I flushed the section with an ear syringe the water came out clear without any trace of ink or a clog so I skipped the usual dip in the ultrasonic. I inked the pen with Noodler's Red Rattler and used it for doodling and crosswords. Almost immediately I saw that my Red Rattler fill had been miraculously transformed into a burgundy shimmer ink. The pen quickly became temperamental and soon quit writing altogether. I took it apart again and did my full cleaning protocol and the amount of shimmer glitter in that nib and feed was amazing. It took eight 90 second ultrasonic treatments to remove it all and it was glitter, not precipitate. I refilled the pen with Red Rattler and it has written the way Parker intended ever since. Red Rattler has a reputation as a "cleaning ink" so it might have dissolved the dregs from the previous fill better than water did.

Dave Campbell
Retired Science Teacher and Active Pen Addict
Every day is a chance to reduce my level of ignorance.

fpn_1425200643__fpn_1425160066__super_pi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

User grade Esties, only. Remove nib to flush with syringe and/or drop nib/feed in plastic film can filled with water for ultrasonic bath. Take 10 mL syringe with blunt tip needle and CAREFULLY flush out sac. It works and it's easy. I have never even thought of putting shimmer ink in any vintage pen except for the Sherman tank of the fountain pen world.

 

I did end up with one vintage Burgundy Marble Parker Challenger with shimmer ink in it but I wasn't the one who filled it with the stuff. I found the pen at a flea market and did the standard inspection and cleaning and resac. When I flushed the section with an ear syringe the water came out clear without any trace of ink or a clog so I skipped the usual dip in the ultrasonic. I inked the pen with Noodler's Red Rattler and used it for doodling and crosswords. Almost immediately I saw that my Red Rattler fill had been miraculously transformed into a burgundy shimmer ink. The pen quickly became temperamental and soon quit writing altogether. I took it apart again and did my full cleaning protocol and the amount of shimmer glitter in that nib and feed was amazing. It took eight 90 second ultrasonic treatments to remove it all and it was glitter, not precipitate. I refilled the pen with Red Rattler and it has written the way Parker intended ever since. Red Rattler has a reputation as a "cleaning ink" so it might have dissolved the dregs from the previous fill better than water did.

 

 

I think this is a very good point, obviously a lesson learned and now shared.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      43844
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      33557
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. inkstainedruth
      inkstainedruth
      26728
    5. jar
      jar
      26101
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Shanghai Knife Dude
      I have the Sailor Naginata and some fancy blade nibs coming after 2022 by a number of new workshop from China.  With all my respect, IMHO, they are all (bleep) in doing chinese characters.  Go use a bush, or at least a bush pen. 
    • A Smug Dill
      It is the reason why I'm so keen on the idea of a personal library — of pens, nibs, inks, paper products, etc. — and spent so much money, as well as time and effort, to “build” it for myself (because I can't simply remember everything, especially as I'm getting older fast) and my wife, so that we can “know”; and, instead of just disposing of what displeased us, or even just not good enough to be “given the time of day” against competition from >500 other pens and >500 other inks for our at
    • adamselene
      Agreed.  And I think it’s good to be aware of this early on and think about at the point of buying rather than rationalizing a purchase..
    • A Smug Dill
      Alas, one cannot know “good” without some idea of “bad” against which to contrast; and, as one of my former bosses (back when I was in my twenties) used to say, “on the scale of good to bad…”, it's a spectrum, not a dichotomy. Whereas subjectively acceptable (or tolerable) and unacceptable may well be a dichotomy to someone, and finding whether the threshold or cusp between them lies takes experiencing many degrees of less-than-ideal, especially if the decision is somehow influenced by factors o
    • adamselene
      I got my first real fountain pen on my 60th birthday and many hundreds of pens later I’ve often thought of what I should’ve known in the beginning. I have many pens, the majority of which have some objectionable feature. If they are too delicate, or can’t be posted, or they are too precious to face losing , still they are users, but only in very limited environments..  I have a big disliking for pens that have the cap jump into the air and fly off. I object to Pens that dry out, or leave blobs o
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Files






×
×
  • Create New...