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How To Darken Parker Quink Blue Black With Solv-X?


GreenMountain
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Hi Folks,

 

I bought some old Parker Quink Blue-Black with SOLV-X. The bottle has been opened, but doesn't smell bad and the ink doesn't have any odd consistency. There doesn't appear to be any blue to the color, and it is not very saturated at all, in fact looks like a mid-grey. Nice shading, but not dark enough for my EF nibs.

Does anyone have any suggestions for darkening the ink? Leave the top off the bottle for a number of weeks? Just live with it?

 

Thanks!

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Hi Green Mountain,

 

You're dealing with dye deterioration from age. Mixing vintage inks with new inks, or even other vintage inks is a rough game... LOTS of variables that can range from A-Z for each individual bottle... because they have all aged differently... and not always well.

 

The best advice I can give you is either live with it or look for another old bottle and hope it aged better.

 

I've known the old Quink b/b to be gray like yours to a gorgeous blue-blue-black.

 

Best of luck.

 

 

Sean :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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Its probably too late to edit above, so I'll add on:

 

There's no harm with experimenting, but use sample vials and take METICULOUS notes and while chemical reactions are usually pretty quick, let the sample mixes stand for a couple of weeks to see what they do. Also, get a handful of Preppy's to test the samples in and write with the samples for 2-4 weeks and see if they age well.

 

If you find a formula that yields favorable results, ration it up and use on the main bottle and you're good to go. 👍

 

 

Sean :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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I would probably first try adding some dark blue, because if the blue-black is now grey the blue has certainly deteriorated (probably also the black).

If you have some blue to spare it could be fun to try.

Follow advise and mix in a separate vial, and check that no precipitate forms. Also use small quantities initially, if it goes wrong throw the whole thing away...

Waiting for two weeks is possibly too long, Quink should be a rather tame ink, and if you mix it with some other western ink, like Quink itself, Pelikan, Montblanc, Aurora, JH, R&K, and similar it's unlikely to be very risky.

Try it, then leave it in the vial, and see if it remains liquid in the following days or forms a sediment at the bottom.

You can add black instead of blue, but if the starting ink is grey you'll get black... not blue black...

If adding blue does not give you a blue black...they you're probably better off just mixing some blue and some black from new bottles, or buy a ready made blue black :)

Edited by sansenri
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Hmmm...thanks, folks. The reason I got the ink was to have a nice, safe ink to use in a vintage pen. Given that I don't have any old Quink Blue with Solv-X, the only ink I'd feel comfortable mixing in my old expensive pen, I think I'll just learn to like it.

Sometimes washed out colors are nice to have on a quiet, rainy day.

Anyone have any old blue Quink to trade? I have some vintage turquoise Quink.

But back to the question: Is there any reason NOT to just leave the cap off to see if evaporation will do the trick? Even if the ink were just a shade darker I'd be happier.

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Might sound counter-intuitive, but if you want to repair a greyed BlueBlack back to a bluer or darker BlueBlack, don't add blue nor black. Try adding that turquoise or even Red.

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OK, I'll try the turquoise, in measured amounts in a sample vial, Sean.

I suspect I'll just get yet another teal, of which I have a surfeit! I'll let you know.

 

Cheers,

 

Grey Today

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OK, I'll try the turquoise, in measured amounts in a sample vial, Sean.

 

I suspect I'll just get yet another teal, of which I have a surfeit! I'll let you know.

 

Cheers,

 

Grey Today

Hi Grey,

 

Great. You'll be fine doing it that way. 👍

 

Btw, Tamiya is right about the turquoise. I was so caught up with the safety protocols; I forgot to give you some practical advice. :headsmack:

 

 

Sean :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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but honestly go out and buy yourself a new bottle of the ink you want...

for use on vintage pens stay on safe brands Pelikan, Quink, Edelstein, JH, Montblanc, Aurora

don't trust very saturated inks

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Right, Sansenri, and particularly not highly alkaline ink (such as my favorite, Doyou).

In the meantime, I have a new old pen that wasn't quite cleaned out, so I'll try the Grey Quink.

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How old is the solv-x labeled ink? 60s 70s? I remember seeing that labelling long ago, but I think all the Quink I've personally bought had dropped the mention of it (likely still in there, though I think some of the anti-SITB chems have become regulated over time so the specific formula may have changed). I also have a bottle of fairly watery gray vintage ink (Carter's by the bottle shape?), that I left open for a week to try to concentrate... it did help a bit but despite concentrating the pigment a bit, the ink still looked faded.

Edited by awa54

David-

 

So many restoration projects...

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How old is the solv-x labeled ink? 60s 70s? I remember seeing that labelling long ago, but I think all the Quink I've personally bought had dropped the mention of it (likely still in there, though I think some of the anti-SITB chems have become regulated over time so the specific formula may have changed). I also have a bottle of fairly watery gray vintage ink (Carter's by the bottle shape?), that I left open for a week to try to concentrate... it did help a bit but despite concentrating the pigment a bit, the ink still looked faded.

Hi AWA,

 

Yeah, Solv-X was dropped in the early to mid '90's due to health concerns.

 

 

Sean :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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I'm going to try a coffee filter over the open bottle and leave it for a few months...maybe the Solv-x will evaporate too, but as is, shades nicely but can't read it!

Will report back in a bit.

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My guesstimate rule on Quink bottles:

 

- the art-deco bottles are from the '40s and maybe very early '50s.

 

- most of the '50s: bottle looks a lot like a current bottle, but with the metal cap of the art-deco bottles

 

- Super-modern rectangle with sharp edges: 1960's

 

- Current bottle shape began in the 1970's.

 

As Sean says (and welcome back, Sean!), Parker dropped Solv-X in the 1990's, most likely because it was thought to be dangerous to the people in Parker's ink factories.

 

Right now, one of my front-line inks is a 50:50 mix of 1950's Quink Blue with a recent Quink Blue, permanent -- not washable -- bought from The Writing Desk. The older Quink had evaporated to look as if it was a darker blue, maybe more concentrated. The modern Quink revived the blue color and maybe reduced the concentration. Works fine.

 

I have also made a 50:50 mix of Quink Blue-black (with Solv-X) and Private Reserve DC Electric Blue. A pleasing dark blue with the Solv-X smell.

Washington Nationals 2019: the fight for .500; "stay in the fight"; WON the fight

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My guesstimate rule on Quink bottles:

 

- the art-deco bottles are from the '40s and maybe very early '50s.

 

- most of the '50s: bottle looks a lot like a current bottle, but with the metal cap of the art-deco bottles

 

- Super-modern rectangle with sharp edges: 1960's

 

- Current bottle shape began in the 1970's.

 

Hi Welch,

 

I'd say your bottle/era analysis is spot-on.

 

 

As Sean says (and welcome back, Sean!), Parker dropped Solv-X in the 1990's, most likely because it was thought to be dangerous to the people in Parker's ink factories.

 

 

Thank you, Welch; it's nice to be back. 😊

 

 

 

Right now, one of my front-line inks is a 50:50 mix of 1950's Quink Blue with a recent Quink Blue, permanent -- not washable -- bought from The Writing Desk. The older Quink had evaporated to look as if it was a darker blue, maybe more concentrated. The modern Quink revived the blue color and maybe reduced the concentration. Works fine.

 

👍 Solid blend. To those in the United States, looking for Quink Permanent Blue; I recommend checking Endless Pens, they usually have it stock at a great price. I used to have to import it from England or Japan... I had used up the stash you had given me... thanks for those. 👍 :)

 

 

 

I have also made a 50:50 mix of Quink Blue-black (with Solv-X) and Private Reserve DC Electric Blue. A pleasing dark blue with the Solv-X smell.

 

 

Great blend! I have long used Electric DC Blue as a substitute for PPS.

 

Sean :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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Oh, great ideas. When I make a mix, I'll post pics.

OK, great. :thumbup:

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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slightly off topic, but just an FYI: when you see part of a dye gone, it is symptomatic of having the bottle in sunlight for a great Many years. Ink bottles with ink in them look beautiful when sunlight hits them, but it does wear the ink out in interesting ways. Keep that in mind.

 

If you’re the type that likes seeing ink in sunlight, a trick is get a vintage bottle with ink residue in it and lightly rehydrate, let the ink hit that. I’ve done that with a couple old quink and Carters bottles. Looks great.

 

By the way, corniche, I really love your avatar photo!

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slightly off topic, but just an FYI: when you see part of a dye gone, it is symptomatic of having the bottle in sunlight for a great Many years. Ink bottles with ink in them look beautiful when sunlight hits them, but it does wear the ink out in interesting ways. Keep that in mind.

 

If youre the type that likes seeing ink in sunlight, a trick is get a vintage bottle with ink residue in it and lightly rehydrate, let the ink hit that. Ive done that with a couple old quink and Carters bottles. Looks great.

 

By the way, corniche, I really love your avatar photo!

Hi Eharriett,

 

I completely agree. I've always believed ink should come in amber or cobalt glass, but I don't think anyone sells it that way. Naturally, they want to show off the colors, but tinted glass would be better for the ink.

 

Thank you; it's a J3a Hudson specially designed by Henry Dreyfuss, (the Wahl Eversharp Skyline designer - the train came first in 1938); for the New York Central's 20th Century Limited.

 

Sean :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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