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What Is The Wettest Pen You Own



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I made this assumption prior to purchase, but my Pelikan 140 turned out to be quite dry--a nice pen but needing a wet, lubricated ink to provide a pleasant writing experience. I tried various inks for almost a year and a half before settling on Iroshizuku Kujaku.

that is my favorite ink in the iroshizuku lineup! i feel that they are well lubricated, its interesting how a your pen ran dry, even tho vintage pens seem to be on the wetter side of the spectrum.

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Ha! Complicated answer. Interestingly, as I write, my 823 is not inked for about the first time in 2 years. I currently grab any one of the below at home since they are all inked. For my trip tomorrow I am taking my bullet raw brass Fisher Space Pen that I recently got, which is why I ran out my 823.

 

My profile picture is there to drive the OCD in the crowd nuts.

 

49446857218_be14eb8b9b_k.jpg

 

Namiki Vermillion Urushi No. 20

Kaweco Brass Sport

Visconti HS Elegance

Visconti HS Bronze Age

Pelikan M800 Renaissance Brown

Lamy 2000

Sailor King of Pen Pro Gear

Waterman Carene

ST Dupont Olympio XL

Mb 149

 

Note: apologies... I had a Visconti ink pot explosion minutes before with ink all over the place, so my pens look all smudged but I was just handling them with wet hands.

hahahha! that is a bummer :P what a coincidence that the pilot was un-inked. Nice collection you have there, all of the pens seem to be iconic and stand out on their own! have a nice trip tmrw.

 

Ps: regarding the ink accident, as long as its not baystate blue your fine :P

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A waterman exception n&d,it is like a thirsty zebra.

i like the personification you made :P are modern watermans still as iconic ?

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My wettest Vintage pen is a Conklin, can't recall the model. To get it to not gush required the use of Pelikan ink, with Waterman ink it was unusable.

My wettest modern pen is an Aurora Talentium. It does not gush, irrespective of ink, but it does write wetter with some. It is a Medium nibbed pen. And, it never ever is a hard start, nor des it ever dry out. I routinely use Montblanc ink in it and the flow is wet, but not too wet.

are montblac inks said to be dry or wet out of your experience ?

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modernovervintage

i like the personification you made :P are modern watermans still as iconic ?

Thanks haha. Not as iconic but reliable writers.

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Yeah, the ebonite feed definitely helps in that. My guess is that they were designed and tuned to work with the inks Pelikan had back then (and well, still does, the 4001 line is ancient and the inks are on the dry side, especially the BB). With more wet inks that part of their character becomes more pronounced.

i think it's due to the ebonite feed tho, right ?

 

 

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My sailor music nib is my wettest by far - it absolutely dumps ink on the page. So much that it might take up to 30 seconds to dry completely.

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i have heard that it is a good quality pen, and it feels substantial

Its very well made but the snap cap is super tight (uncapping it requires a rather violent pull) so be careful not to elbow the person to your side. I havent used it much yet because the M nib is far too wide for me, but Im thinking of sending it to a nibmeister because it is very pretty and comfortable.

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My sailor music nib is my wettest by far - it absolutely dumps ink on the page. So much that it might take up to 30 seconds to dry completely.

do you have it in 14K or 21 K ?

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Its very well made but the snap cap is super tight (uncapping it requires a rather violent pull) so be careful not to elbow the person to your side. I havent used it much yet because the M nib is far too wide for me, but Im thinking of sending it to a nibmeister because it is very pretty and comfortable.

will you be tuning it to a F ?

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Mine would be a Wahl Eversharp Skyline with a 14k medium nib. It's useable, but will empty a sac in a standard paragraph or two of writing. This would be followed by my Esterbrook J with a 3698 nib, which can hang on for a page or two....

Edited by JakobS

FP Ink Orphanage-Is an ink not working with your pens, not the color you're looking for, is never to see the light of day again?!! If this is you, and the ink is in fine condition otherwise, don't dump it down the sink, or throw it into the trash, send it to me (payment can be negotiated), and I will provide it a nice safe home with love, and a decent meal of paper! Please PM me!<span style='color: #000080'>For Sale:</span> TBA

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It's no contest. My Pelikan M1005 with a fine nib. It's so wet that for me it is unusable. Soon to be sent for a fix (hopefully). I have other wet pens, and my observation is that the more expensive the pen the wetter the nib, but that's from a small sample size so probably not a good generalization.

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Mine would be a Wahl Eversharp Skyline with a 14k medium nib. It's useable, but will empty a sac in a standard paragraph or two of writing. This would be followed by my Esterbrook J with a 3698 nib, which can hang on for a page or two....

 

it seems that all most of the vintage pens are firehoses by default

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It's no contest. My Pelikan M1005 with a fine nib. It's so wet that for me it is unusable. Soon to be sent for a fix (hopefully). I have other wet pens, and my observation is that the more expensive the pen the wetter the nib, but that's from a small sample size so probably not a good generalization.

it was unusable wet, do you mean it started to leak or something, or did it write very very broad relative to a f

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it seems that all most of the vintage pens are firehoses by default

 

They might have been set up so that their ink flow was optimal for vintage iron-gall inks. I believe that vintage i-g inks contained more iron & wrote (even-) ‘drier’ than modern i-g inks do.

 

My advice to anyone who finds their pen to be ‘too wet’ is, for a first step, to try running a ‘dry’ ink through it.

E.g.s inks such as Pelikan 4001 Königsblau (Royal Blue), their 4001 Blue-Black, or maybe even one of the Edelsteins.

If those won’t tame the pen enough for you, try iron-galls such as R&K Salix or Scabiosa, or the various i-g inks sold by KWZI, or ESSRI, or Diamine Registrar’s Ink.

 

Only after finding a pen inked with those inks to be ‘too wet’ would I want to send it off for irreversible alterations to its nib and/or feed. Especially on one of the larger (i.e. more expensive) pens like a Pelikan Soverän.

 

Of course, my idea is of absolutely no use at all if one hates the colours of all the inks I’ve mentioned, or really, really wants to use a ‘favourite’ ink in their pen but finds its flow too-wet for that particular ink.

Foul in clear conditions, but handsome in the fog.

mini-postcard-exc.png

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