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Create A Simple Landscape Using Fountain Pen Ink And Water


NickiStew
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By employing water based techniques, one can achieve a convincing watercolour style painting by simply letting the inks do what they do. The demonstration below, has been created using one ink, Diamine Earl Grey. At first glance, one might assume that 3 or 4 colours have been employed.

The wonderful thing is that this simple wet in wet technique is actually easier and quicker than watercolour painting! Without even touching upon the word ‘serendipity’ I think this may appeal to all amateur artists for this one reason alone. The sky and foregrounds have created themselves!

 

What is also of interest is that all ink ranges are made differently. Each ink maker has their own recipes and processes. So, one range of inks may suit a particular subject matter better than another. Robert Oster Signature inks are ideal for bright conditions. KWZ inks are more suited to soft focus. Diamine are great for more graphic use. Noodler’s are more experimental and abstract but also check out: Vinta Inks, Troublemaker Inks and Sailor Ink Studio for more intense chromatic behaviours.

 

For enthusiasts of art journaling, diary keeping and sketching, this simple and natural process enables a simple and seamless visual continuity and a medium continuity between image and the written word. Why not give it a go?

 

Paper: Bockingford Watercolour Paper 200lb Rough

Equipment: 2 x jars of water, Bottle of Diamine Earl Grey, Watercolour brush size 24, Watercolour brush size 5, Noodlers Nib Creeper pen.

 

Instructions:

 

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Take swatch card measuring 70mm x 95mm and place in landscape position and wet 3/5 of surface with large brush

 

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With small brush add Diamine Earl Grey

 

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Turn card upside down and wet surface 2-3mm below the wetted area above

 

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Dip pen into ink and draw a line through the newly wetted area

 

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Dip pen into ink and repeat

 

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With the pen, add a couple of ink marks to the top area as this is now semi-wet, the spread will be less and the ink more intense

 

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Allow the chromatography to happen and enjoy watching the greys, purples, reds and turquoises slowly come out of the ink

 

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The finished, and dry, landscape created with serendipity. Totally non contrived and utterly beautiful.

 

Works with most inks that display chromatic behaviours.

Edited by NickiStew

To view the full article and images please visit my blog: **** WWW.NICKSTEWART.INK ****

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Fan-(****)-tastic!! :thumbup:

 

Thanks,

 

Sean :)

https://www.catholicscomehome.org/

 

"Every one therefore that shall confess Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father Who is in Heaven." - MT. 10:32

"Any society that will give up liberty to gain security deserves neither and will lose both." - Ben Franklin

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Thank you for sharing this technique.

 

I use this same technique with watercolors. I have used it with ink a few times, but I need to give it a go a few more times. I have tried it with the watercolor paper that I use (Arches cold pressed), but it doesn't seem to give the same effect. Many times the ink comes out more granular than I would like.

 

Thank you again.

"Today will be gone in less than 24 hours. When it is gone, it is gone. Be wise, but enjoy! - anonymous today

 

 

 

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Love this! What an extraordinary way to explore the chemistry of the ink while also creating a gorgeous painting. Thank you for these detailed instructions! Very helpful to have your paper choice listed as well. I'm guessing that has a lot to do with the final results. I can't wait to try this out!

Moderation in everything, including moderation.

--Mark Twain

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Didn't know this technique. Thank you for the heads up. Now I know something new to investigate and learn.

If you are to be ephemeral, leave a good scent.

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~ NickiStew:

 

Thank you for the time and care in preparing this thread.

That's helpful information about your techniques.

Tom K.

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Thanks for sharing this with the details.

The prizes of life are never to be had without trouble - Horace
Kind words do not cost much, yet they accomplish much - Pascal

You are never too old to set a new goal or dream a new dream - C.S. Lewis

 Favorite shop:https://www.fountainpenhospital.com

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Amazing! Thanks a lot for taking the time to share this with us!

It isn't true that you live only once. You only die once. You live lots of times, if you know how. (Bobby Darin)

 

Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go. (Oscar Wilde)

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If you live in a colder area where there is a frosty patch of ground you can place the paper directly onto the frost out of the sun while it is still wet and create some wonderful effects. eghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/_I2O1YWtUskQ/S0D8r6RgDeI/AAAAAAAAAMY/CHbrfSYmi1I/s1600/Frosted+Window+outlined.jpg

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He's going to get us all trying and failing... Though I suppose that's the way to go. :lol:

 

NickiStew, in case you read this, where do you get swatch cards that small? I cannot find anything below DIN-A6; if I cut it myself, it looks unprofessional, and if I take it to the local reprographics, I'm not able to make them be careful so the two halves of the paper are the same size.

It isn't true that you live only once. You only die once. You live lots of times, if you know how. (Bobby Darin)

 

Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go. (Oscar Wilde)

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He's going to get us all trying and failing... Though I suppose that's the way to go. :lol:

 

NickiStew, in case you read this, where do you get swatch cards that small? I cannot find anything below DIN-A6; if I cut it myself, it looks unprofessional, and if I take it to the local reprographics, I'm not able to make them be careful so the two halves of the paper are the same size.

 

 

I just tried the landscape (with MV Moonstone). MUCH more difficult than it looks! :D

Much skill involved.

 

My paper scrap was probably Bockingford.

 

 

If you live in a colder area where there is a frosty patch of ground you can place the paper directly onto the frost out of the sun while it is still wet and create some wonderful effects. eghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/_I2O1YWtUskQ/S0D8r6RgDeI/AAAAAAAAAMY/CHbrfSYmi1I/s1600/Frosted+Window+outlined.jpg

 

 

Amazing! Thanks a lot for taking the time to share this with us!

 

 

Thanks for sharing this with the details.

 

 

~ NickiStew:

 

Thank you for the time and care in preparing this thread.

That's helpful information about your techniques.

Tom K.

 

 

Didn't know this technique. Thank you for the heads up. Now I know something new to investigate and learn.

 

 

Love this! What an extraordinary way to explore the chemistry of the ink while also creating a gorgeous painting. Thank you for these detailed instructions! Very helpful to have your paper choice listed as well. I'm guessing that has a lot to do with the final results. I can't wait to try this out!

 

 

Thank you for sharing this technique.

 

I use this same technique with watercolors. I have used it with ink a few times, but I need to give it a go a few more times. I have tried it with the watercolor paper that I use (Arches cold pressed), but it doesn't seem to give the same effect. Many times the ink comes out more granular than I would like.

 

Thank you again.

 

 

Thank you for sharing this!

 

 

I've been doing wet on wet watercolors with my granddaughter but hadn't thought to use ink. Thank you for this idea!

 

 

Fan-(****)-tastic!! :thumbup:

 

Thanks,

 

Sean :)

 

 

Beautiful and inspiring!

 

 

That's so wonderful of you to share your technique. Thank you!

 

 

Yay! I'm gonna try this asap. Thanks for sharing!

 

 

Thanks for sharing the lovely little painting and technique! :wub:

 

 

A Happy New Year to you all! Many thanks for all your comments. In answer to questions regarding my swatch cards, I make these myself to a set size so that they fit snugly into my reference albums. Here's question for you. If I got packs of these produced, would you buy them? If any of you decide to have a go at the tutorial, please can I ask you to post your art here? Many thanks. Nick

To view the full article and images please visit my blog: **** WWW.NICKSTEWART.INK ****

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I tried, and immediately realized that I don't have a suitable paper. My heaviest is a 250gsm with a glittery-gold overlay of a rose pattern (it was gifted to me, kinda tacky but...). As soon as I applied water with a brush it slurped it in seconds, subsequent applications of ink did not move a millimeter and couldn't obtain anything comparable. Now I need to get new paper.

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