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Help...can Someone Identify This Pen?



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I picked up this tier three pen some months ago on Ebay because of the art deco look it has and because...well I have no other excuse. Besides, do I need one? Anyway, when I received it the pressure bar and sac were shot but the visulated section was quite clear (the pen is inked in the photo) so I coaxed the pen apart, replaced both and got it writing again. It actually is a smooth writing pen but now I'm curious to know who might have made it and when, The only educated guess that I'm willing to make (and maybe I'm not right on this) is that the pen was made sometime in the 1930s...then again maybe during WWII? Who knows? There is no branding mark on the pen body that I can find but the lever does appear to have the letter "P" on it. In addition, the nib is labeled, "DUROPOINT 14KT GOLD PLATE," the gold plating having said adios bye-bye decades ago. My hope is that someone on the FPN has seen this pen before or one like it and knows who might have made it and when.

 

Thanks,

 

Cliff

 

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post-125189-0-78708700-1570499080_thumb.jpg

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Sorry I can't help you....but it's a fine looking pen. :thumbup:

Top does look '30ish.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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Sorry I can't help you....but it's a fine looking pen. :thumbup:

Top does look '30ish.

 

Thanks. My hope is that someone out there may have a clue as to who and when. Surprisingly, it writes quite well.

 

Cliff

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Whatever it is, looks like someone put some love into designing it! Feel free do disregard, as this isn't your purpose for posting, but how does it write?

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Whatever it is, looks like someone put some love into designing it! Feel free do disregard, as this isn't your purpose for posting, but how does it write?

I agree with you. I guess that's why I ended up buying it. But how does it write? Actually, it is a nice writing fountain pen, especially for a tier 3. It has a fine to medium fine point that writes quite smoothly. In my opinion the nib is slightly on the wet side which, of course, contributes to the smoothness. I have used it almost exclusively since posting this thread, filling it twice with Hero 232 Blue Black, an iron gall ink that is very well behaved but difficult to find anymore. I ran the pen out of ink last evening so I flushed it and put it away for now.

 

Hopefully someone out there will see the photos and know something about this pen. There is the letter "P" on the lever and the DUROPOINT imprint on the nib. Anyone?

 

Cliff

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hey- I have a similar looking pen but in brass and it's made by Peerless I believe. Don't know anything about them but if I were betting my money I'd say that's the maker.

 

dan

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Duropoint, probably means an 'iridium' tipping.

Could also have something to do with the stiffness of the nib.

 

Balance was important back when one wrote all day with a pen. Even in lesser pens.

 

I had some pre&just after the war, second and third tier Wearevers that wrote very well, with good balance. It was the nib that dictated, actually if second or third tier, with those. The balance on them were better than the Wearever from the '60-70's*** that my wife reserved as hers, because it is turquoise. Those '40's pens were pre-ball point, so were in the Esterbrook or Shaffer sub brand level; and they too needed to balance well.

 

***Back in the day when we were not well off enough to afford color TV, I had some of those '60's Wearever, the 'ugly' so what, metal capped Esterbrooks and even a Venus....which wrote, but wasn't what a poor boy was looking for.

That was one pen that was stolen than I didn't miss.

There were pen collectors even back then.............folks with a drawer full of stolen pens. All of mine in my school time were stolen..............too poor to have my name engraved on them. :headsmack:

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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Hey- I have a similar looking pen but in brass and it's made by Peerless I believe. Don't know anything about them but if I were betting my money I'd say that's the maker.

 

dan

I'm going to look into this. Does your pen have an imprint then? What about the letter "P" on the lever? I am intrigued by this pen and would really like to find out who and when.

 

Cliff

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