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Montegrappa Piston Problem (Le)


Andrew_L

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Hi everybody!

Does anyone know how to disassemble Montegrappa(piston or piston emulated filler) from a limited edition series?

This is MG La Traviata Sterling Silver.
The piston does not work(don't move by knob), probably a broken stem. The knob rotate is very easy. There is no access from the pen unit hole - there is a steel thin hole. I don't know how to remove the piston knob, there are no keyhole slots like on Pelikan/Aurora/TWSBI and there are no wedges like on Omas or vintage pens.

Anyone got any good ideas?

 

Thanks!

 

https://images.vfl.ru/ii/1567439176/e7cb6aeb/27738321.jpg

 

https://images.vfl.ru/ii/1567439177/977feaf4/27738322.jpg

 

https://images.vfl.ru/ii/1567439177/1fb4c035/27738323.jpg

About fountain pens, inks and arts: http://lenskiy.org

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  • 4 months later...
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I am afraid that with a captive converter like this one, you'd be better off sending the pen to Montegrappa to get fixed, even if it takes longer than you'd like. Good luck!

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Of course, I know what you meant. It seems that with this type of built-in captive converter, there is no way to self service them, unlike a traditional piston filler where you can disassemble the whole thing, like old Omas, any MB 146/149, or most of the vintage pens etc. Captive converters/built in pistons from Montegrappa, Stipula, Visconti etc have seemed to be difficult or impossible to assemble beyond taking the nib unit out.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Yeah, but I did it:)

 

https://images.vfl.ru/ii/1580208152/a0f07457/29353611.jpg

 

La Traviata anatomy (detailed)

Edited by Andrew_L

About fountain pens, inks and arts: http://lenskiy.org

or watch on social networks

Facebook: @ArtDesignPenS

Telegram: @ArtDesignPenS

Pinterest: ArtDesignPenS

Instagram: @andrew.lensky

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Thanks friends!

 

I translated post to English (by old link from above).

 

To como: There no is X-Rays, there is a CT Scans, but yeah this is hi-technology:).

About fountain pens, inks and arts: http://lenskiy.org

or watch on social networks

Facebook: @ArtDesignPenS

Telegram: @ArtDesignPenS

Pinterest: ArtDesignPenS

Instagram: @andrew.lensky

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I read your link using google translator:-) Even when you can see with CT Scan, it’s difficult to know if it s just superglued or heat-sensitive glued together. There you did superbly, pulling knowledge and resources together.

 

The observation of how best maintain this kind of Montegrappa pens is very helpful. I really love the design and material of the Montegrappa and Visconti pens, but their philosophy of much glue, I do not prefer.

 

Thanks again for sharing with us this daring endeavor!

 

Thanks friends!

 

I translated post to English (by old link from above).

 

To como: There no is X-Rays, there is a CT Scans, but yeah this is hi-technology:).

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Yeah!:)

 

I also very liked Italien design in fountain pens, but do not understand ideology of captive converter construction. There is so much thermo-glue:( and absolutely not-friendly serviced system. I very liked piston-filler mechanism like a Pelikan or Montblanc, but in Italian pen better use cartridge\converter, like a Montegrappa Miya - one of the best modern balanced fountain pen in my opinion:).

About fountain pens, inks and arts: http://lenskiy.org

or watch on social networks

Facebook: @ArtDesignPenS

Telegram: @ArtDesignPenS

Pinterest: ArtDesignPenS

Instagram: @andrew.lensky

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Yeah! :)

 

I also very liked Italien design in fountain pens, but do not understand ideology of captive converter construction. There is so much thermo-glue:( and absolutely not-friendly serviced system. I very liked piston-filler mechanism like a Pelikan or Montblanc, but in Italian pen better use cartridge\converter, like a Montegrappa Miya - one of the best modern balanced fountain pen in my opinion:).

Agreed! The captive converter makes no sense at all.

The Montegrappa Classica seems to make a good compromise where you can remove the end cap and pretend it is a piston filler or easily unscrew the barrel to reveal the converter. Still, I prefer a Pelikan or Montblance piston filler for their greater capacity.

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